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What is SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT? What does SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT mean?

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Text Comments (8)
Melese Dagne (3 months ago)
Very fast to listen!
Onkar Saran (5 months ago)
So fast
Rina Phuti (6 months ago)
Thank you for the clip
Hema Latha (10 months ago)
So fast
Karabo Khakhau (9 months ago)
Alter your speed settings
Neetu Yadav (1 year ago)
So fast is she teaching or reading loud
Annus Dehwar (1 year ago)
so fast didn't understand
Karabo Khakhau (9 months ago)
You can alter your speed settings

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