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WE ARE STILL HERE In depth preview Lakota docuementary
 
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An in depth preview of the upcoming documentary WE ARE STILL HERE by Value Creaton Films www.facebook.com/valuecreationfilms about Lakota life in the 21st century. Presented in association with SAVE OUR TRIBAL YOUTH www.saveourtribalyouth.com and Crawford Multi Media www.crawafordmultimedia.com
Views: 30999 Rick Kline
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 1 - System of Wellness
 
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Dr. Evan Adams (Smoke Signals) narrates Implementing the Vision: BC First Nations Health Governance, an evocative documentary explaining issues in First Nations health and the efforts to address them. The film describes the plan by BC First Nations, in partnership with federal and provincial governments, to change health care systems in British Columbia. Told in four parts, the film uses interviews in a story-telling approach to a complex and fascinating history and the move to improve First Nations health that is unfolding in BC today.
Views: 11668 fnhealthcouncil
First Nation's Treaty History in B.C., Canada
 
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This was broadcasted in the 90's and gives us a timeless understanding of the challenges First Nations have faced in Canada. There are some scenes of great radio host and sadly missed Jack Webster (resident on Saltspring), interviewing a First Nations hero Frank Calder.
Views: 12546 saltspringpictures
Tlingit Music--Past, Present and Future: Ed Littlefield at TEDxSitka
 
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Ed Littlefield is a Tlingit Native of Southeast Alaska currently working on composing and arranging Native music from the Tlingit tradition. He studied percussion at the University of Idaho and has played in the Idaho-Washington Symphony, The Orion Trombone Quartet, Dallas Brass, the Jazz Police and many other professional groups in the Northwest. Ed has recently completed an album combining traditional Alaskan Native music with jazz, called "Walking Between Worlds," featuring the Native Jazz Quartet: Ed Littlefield (drums); Jason Marsalis (vibes); Christian Fabian (bass); and Reuel Lubag (piano). His talk focuses on this fusion and the possibilities it offers. About TEDx, x = independently organized event. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 4002 TEDx Talks
Indigenous Perspectives and Representations in the Media - panel discussion
 
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With Jennifer David, Jocelyn Formsma and Howard Adler (bios below). Moderated by Greg Macdougall. On Saturday Nov 17, 2012 at the Media Democracy Conference - http://organizingforjustice.ca - University of Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory. Hosted by Organizing For Justice, and the Ottawa Working Group of the Media Co-op. Panel Description: A facilitated discussion on the intersection of Indigenous peoples and the media. What approaches do Indigenous media-makers adopt in doing their work? How well are mainstream and alternative media doing in considering and representing Indigenous perspectives to both Native and non-Native audiences? What work still needs to be done? Bios: Jocelyn Formsma is a member of the Moose Cree First Nation and currently lives in Ottawa, ON. Jocelyn has extensive experience in children's rights and youth engagement and has a Bachelor of Social Sciences in Public Administration. She is currently pursuing her law degree from the University of Ottawa and will graduate in 2015. She is a film maker and host of "The Circle", a radio show featuring Indigenous artists and issues, on CHUO the Ottawa U campus radio station. Jennifer David was born and raised in northern Ontario and is a member of Chapleau Cree First Nation. She has spent her career working in and supporting Aboriginal media in Canada, first at Television Northern Canada, then as APTN's first Director of Communications, then as a consultant with Debwe Communications. Jennifer has a degree in Journalism from Carleton University and currently runs her own First Nation management consulting company called Stonecircle. She recently self-published a book about the launch of APTN: "Original People, Original Television". Howard Adler is an award winning writer, and an artist that has worked in diverse mediums, including visual art, sound art, stained glass, theatre, dance, video editing, and film. In 2009 he won the Canadian Aboriginal Youth Writing Challenge (19-29 age category) with his video script "Johnny Seven Fires". He is currently the Co-Director of the Asinabka Festival, an Indigenous film and media arts festival that had its inaugural year in Ottawa in June 2012. Howard is Jewish and Anishinaabe and a member of Lac des Mille Lacs First Nation in North-western Ontario.
Views: 1841 org4jus
Suzlon Energy
 
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Suzlon Energy Limited, ranked as the world’s fifth largest wind turbine supplier, in terms of cumulative installed capacity and market share, at the end of 2013. The company’s global spread extends across Asia, Australia, Europe, Africa and North and South America with over 24,200 MW of wind energy capacity installed, operations across over 30 countries and a workforce of over 10,000. The Group offers one of the most comprehensive product portfolios – ranging from sub-megawatt onshore turbines at 600 Kilowatts(KW), to the world’s largest commercially-available offshore turbine at 6.15 MW – with a vertically integrated, low - cost, manufacturing base. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 197 Audiopedia
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 185345 Shari Wing

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