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GOLD INDUSTRY IN SOUTH AFRICA & HISTORY OF GOLD MINING 42994
 
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“Visions of Gold” is a short color film on “Gold! The thread from which we weave our dreams! The key to stability!” Produced by South African film maker Emil Nofal in the mid-1960s, the film opens with rows of gold bars as the narrator Joe Stewardson explains how (in1 885) itinerant prospectors George Walker, along with George Harrison, stumbled on surface outcrops of gold-rich conglomerate on an old farm near the Witwatersrand basin —land that is now near the center of Johannesburg. (Both men quickly sold their claims for the equivalent of a few hundred dollars. Today, the gold fields in the region are worth billions.) From across the world, prospectors descended on South Africa in search of gold, as we see throngs of prospectors and opportunists starting at mark 02:45. Spurred on by visions of wealth, the fortune hunters eventually thought they had taken all the gold that was there, we are told. But at mark 06:10, Stewardson explains that more inventive prospectors at the turn of the 20th century found ways to dig deeper into the Earth in search of gold. The worldwide economic depression of the 1930s, we learn at mark 07:00, unraveled the fabric of prosperity. “The spinners of dreams all over the world now wore the dark cloth of despair.” Only the fantasy of gold remained, with South African workers eventually mining more than two miles into the ground in search of gold, as the camera plummets down a mine shaft. By mark 09:20, we see men maneuvering through tunnels and drilling into the Earth in search of deposits, and later watch as men turn the fruits of those labors into glistening gold bars. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 7050 PeriscopeFilm
South Africa's DIY diamond miners emerge from the shadows
 
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Grandmother Clara Maitse, 77, has been arrested seven times over the past decade for illegally mining precious stones in Kimberley, South Africa's diamond hub. Her defiant patience has paid off and small-scale mining, an industry that employs many thousands of people, has now been decriminalised for the first time under a permit system.
Views: 287 AFP news agency
South Africa's Illegal Gold Mines
 
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In the 1970s, South Africa was the world's most prolific exporter of gold. Over the years, industrial decline has seen widespread closures of the mines across the country. However, Johannesburg sits on the biggest gold basin ever discovered. It's perhaps not surprising that many of these abandoned mines have seen a recent boom in illegal mining activity. Everyday, hundreds of illegal gold miners, known as Zama Zamas, descend kilometers deep beneath the surface. The miners often spend weeks underground, toiling away at the country's untapped gold reserves. Observers have suggested that illegal mining is now so widespread, black-market gold arguably supports the communities once subsistent on the very same mines they worked in before they shut down. The lack of policing in the mines has seen the practice go on largely unabated. However, in the absence of law enforcement, the extensive network of abandoned mines beneath the region has become an arena to deadly gang warfare between rival factions. VICE News visited illegal mines near Johannesburg, to meet the Zama Zamas risking life and limb everyday in the violent struggle for South Africa's illegal gold. Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Views: 1696712 VICE News
Keaton Energy granted mining licence for Delmas Project
 
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Keaton Energy, a South African coal explorer, says it has been granted a mining licence for its Delmas project, pushing it closer to becoming a fully fledged mining house. Chief executive Paul Miller, with a resource base of about 200 million tonnes, told ABNs Godfrey Mutizwa that he hopes the company will start full production at some of its short-term projects within 12 months.
Views: 107 CNBCAfrica
The price of gold: Chinese mining in Ghana documentary | Guardian Investigations
 
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Ghana has had a gold rush but here, Afua Hirsch discovers how Chinese immigrants are profiting from industrialising the country's small-scale mining industry. She sees for herself that, for the many locals who chance losing life and limb for a piece of the same pie, the risks are rarely worth it, and explores where the responsibility for regulating this industry lies. The price of gold: Chinese mining in Ghana documentary Subscribe to the Guardian HERE: http://bitly.com/UvkFpD Afua Hirsch reports on Ghana's gold rush in a film that discovers how Chinese immigrants are profiting from industrialising the country's small-scale mining industry. She sees for herself that, for the many locals who chance losing life and limb for a piece of the same pie, the risks are rarely worth it, and explores where the responsibility for regulating this industry lies.
Views: 2346749 The Guardian
1940s SOUTH AFRICA TRAVELOGUE  KIMBERLY DIAMOND MINES & GOLD MINES 43254
 
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Produced in 1948 by Louis De Rochemont Associates, RICHES OF THE VELD is an educational film that gives a rosy portrait of South Africa in the era before apartheid ended. Directed by Bill Colleran, the movie vividly showcases the immense mineral and agricultural wealth of the nation, and includes a visit to the Kimberly Diamond mines. The film features shots of Johannesburg, Kimberly and Cape Town, and also shows a gold refinery and gold mine, vineyards, orange groves, and cattle ranches in the rich Veld. The Veld, also spelled veldt, is a type of wide open rural landscape in Southern Africa. Particularly, it is a flat area covered in grass or low scrub, especially in the countries of South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Namibia. A certain sub-tropical woodland ecoregion of Southern Africa has been officially defined as the Bushveld by the World Wide Fund for Nature. Trees are found only in a few places—frost, fire, and grazing animals allow grass to grow but prevent the growth of trees. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 4186 PeriscopeFilm
SOUTH AFRICA: ORKNEY: GOLD MINE ACCIDENT: 100 MINERS BELIEVED KILLED
 
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English/Nat Rescue workers began the grim task of hoisting the bodies of gold miners killed in an accident Wednesday night in Orkney, South Africa. At least 100 miners are believed to have been killed in the disaster when a locomotive plunged onto a cage carrying workers on the night shift. Some of the dead are thought to be from neighbouring countries, including Mozambique. Bodies are being brought up from the mine shaft in Orkney, where some 100 gold miners plunged to their deaths after a train fell on top of their elevator. Miners watched in shock as rescue workers carried mangled bodies and pieces of bodies wrapped in wool blankets out of the mine. Witnesses at the scene said survivors seemed impossible, since the two-floor lift fell 1.4 miles (2 kms) below the surface. The accident at the mine happened at the end of the night shift when workers piled into the elevator for the long ride to the surface. In Midrand, African leaders met for the World Economic Summit. Mozambique lends many workers to South Africa's huge mining industry, and its leader commented on the disaster. SOUNDBITE: "Since the changes started taking place we have had good conversations with the Chamber of Mines in order to see to it that conditions of work are improved for our miners working in South Africa are improved." SUPERCAPTION: Joacquim Chissano, Mozambican President Officials are saying it looks like human error caused the accident since the locomotive went through a safety barrier. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4b9aeaf86fa4882c263ae34cfce0e5db Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 1882 AP Archive
SOUTH AFRICA: MINERS CRITICISE UK GOLD SELL-OFF
 
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English/Nat Gold sales by the Bank of England came under fire today from South African miners, mine owners and the government. The government accused Britain of breaking an undertaking to consult it before going ahead with it's gold auction. All parties are demanding that further gold sales are stopped and proposed sales by the International Monetary Fund are cancelled. The auction of gold reserves has brought about a 20-year low in the gold price and potentially devastating effects on gold producing countries like South Africa. In Pretoria hundreds of gold miners protested against the expected closure of the 160-year-old E-R-P-M mine which will cost thousands of jobs. And the country's National Union of Mine workers has enlisted the help of sister organisations worldwide in a bid to prevent further gold sales by Britain and proposed sales by the International Monetary Fund. The union claims that "at least 800-thousand jobs" are under threat as a direct result of the gold sales --- the announcements of which sent markets reeling as the price of the yellow metal went into a tail-spin and plunged to record lows. It has already asked the International Chemical, Energy and Mining Federation, the American Mine workers Union and the American Federation of Labour to urge the International Monetary Fund to rethink its planned sale of 10 (m) million ounces of gold. An approach could also be made to the National Union of Miners in the United Kingdom and the British Trades' Union Congress to put pressure on Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair and his Labour government to abort further auctions of its gold reserves. SOUNDBITE: (English) "As our colonisers, they are inflicting more damage on us than help." SUPER CAPTION: Gwede Mantashe, NUM secretary general Tuesday's British auction of 25 tons of gold resulted in the metal's price sliding to a fresh 20 year low of 255-point-25 U-S dollars an ounce. The price of spot gold has fallen 12 percent in the last two months. South Africa is still the biggest producer of gold but it is also the most expensive with many of its mines in a "marginal" state even before the recent gold price collapse. The South African gold industry's role in the domestic economy has been in steady decline since the early 1980s when it accounted for well over half the country's exports. Today that figure is less than 20 percent. SOUNDBITE: (English) "The South African government find both incomprehensible and unacceptable the insensitivity of the British government and its monetary authorities towards the pleas of gold-producing countries, on the handling of the matter of gold sales. This behaviour, and the decisions of other industrialised countries and the IMF on the public handling of this matter is having the effect of defeating the very objectives that they profess to pursue." SUPER CAPTION: Joel Netshitenzhe, South African government spokesman The Chamber of Mines of South Africa condemned the method and timing of the gold sales and warned that it could cost the industry at least 12-thousand jobs. SOUNDBITE: (English) "We'd also be seeking to consolidate our position with the other Highly Indebted Poor Countries who are gold producers in order to make sure that we can speak with one voice on this matter." SUPER CAPTION: Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, South African Minister of Minerals and Energy Affairs It estimates that the combination of planned job losses and further vulnerable jobs will result in about 800-thousand people being exposed to the possibility of no subsistence income. This does not include those jobs at risk from companies which either supply or service the gold mining industry. SOUNDBITE: (English) SOUNDBITE: (English) You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/394838807d3ac73a65354b18d750b460 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 171 AP Archive
SOUTH AFRICA: DIAMOND TRADE
 
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E English/Nat Diamonds used to be a girl's best friend. However today, with Western diamond-buying nations trying to stop the entry of so-called "blood" or "dirty diamonds" onto the market, the sparkling gems have become a political minefield. Civil wars in countries like Angola and Sierra Leone are believed to be funded largely by revenue from diamonds. Now experts from around the world, including war-torn Sierra Leone are to meet in South Africa on Tuesday (September 19) to thrash out ways of solving the thorny problems connected with the trade in diamonds It is the trade in these allegedly illicit diamonds that American lawmakers and the European Union amongst others are trying to curb. Now experts from around the world, including war-torn Sierra Leone are scheduled to meet in South Africa this week to thrash out ways of solving the thorny problems connected with the trade in diamonds It is estimated that about six percent of the world's diamonds are in the hands of Angola's rebel Unita movement. This figure helped a recent European Union decision to impose new diamond-related sanctions on the rebel group. And the United Nations' ban on the import of diamonds from Sierra Leone is gathering support. Smugglers are believed to be moving vast amounts of diamonds from countries like Angola and Sierra Leone, through neighbouring states and on to European diamond centres like Antwerp in Belgium where 85 percent of the world's rough diamonds are traded. The World Diamond Congress has imposed a package of measures to track diamonds from the mines to the jewellers stores. In the United States a group of lawmakers are presently trying to get Congress to pass a law requiring proof of origin of all diamonds sold on world markets. One suggestion is that diamonds be sold in sealed containers with a certificate of origin. At it's meeting in July, the World Diamond Congress supported a system of certification. Some argue that such controls could inflict significant economic damage on diamond-producing countries such as South Africa. De Beers diamond company which controls more than half of the world's diamonds, claims it is virtually impossible to tell where a diamond is originated. Johannesburg diamond merchant Max Barker agrees. SOUNDBITE: (English) "The question is, can you tell the source of rough stones and you can't. Not, not as a rule you can't. You can't. As I say you might have a suspicion but you can't. It's not like a motor car or a wrist watch or something which, it's you know ... there are ways and means of finding out the origin, with a rough diamond, it's very difficult." SUPERCAPTION: Max Barker, Managing Director, Diamond Supply Corporation Setting up and enforcing a certification system for the $6-billion-a-year industry would be at best difficult to control. SOUNDBITE: (English) "In one month there is probably millions of stones being sold worldwide or probably hundreds of millions traded worldwide every month. I mean, how? First of all you don't know the source of the stone and secondly if you did how are you going to control it?" SUPERCAPTION: Max Barker, Managing Director, Diamond Supply Corporation But consumers are starting to ask where their diamonds come from. Gone are the days when the simple act of buying an engagement ring was just an expensive, but romantic gesture. Nowadays pictures of victims of wars in African countries awash with minerals are starting to raise questions. Will the simple purchase of a diamond help result in further massacres? Consumers in the United States are regularly asking whether their gems are "conflict-free". You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/46bfb99eb4182cd968d2516e75df765d Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 5963 AP Archive
Latest on strike by South African gold miners seeking higher wages
 
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(29 Jul 2011) Kloof Gold Mine, Westonaria, Gauteng province, southwest of Johannesburg - 28 July 2011 1. Wide of exterior of Kloof gold mine, Westonaria, showing the shaft rig 2. Various of shaft rig, with wheels spinning 3. Pan right of gold miners walking past the camera, waving 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Zola Vuke, miner at the Kloof Gold Mine: "It''s very terrible, it''s very terrible, to work underground and using that rope. So, there are a lot of things that need to be fixed. Because, in the gold fields, we are crying, that is what I am trying to say." 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Thandisizwe Jiya, miner at the Kloof Gold Mine: "This salary I''ve got, it''s little money. You cannot survive with that wage. 4,000 rand, it''s too little. We have needs." 6. Mid of miners walking past the camera Johannesburg - 28 July 2011 7. Setup of Frans Baleni (on right of screen), General Secretary for the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM), talking to a colleague 8. Cutaway statue of a mineworker 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Frans Baleni, General Secretary for the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM): "A gold mine worker earns as little as 4,000 (rand) and working in an environment that is very arduous, especially gold miners, their environment is very hot, very challenging, as you know that sometimes they can loose limbs and lungs, sacrificed to the dust. It''s a very difficult job, and we think that where we have packers in the retail industry who are earning more than mine workers, it is just unfair." Johannesburg - 29 July 2011 10. Wide of interior the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE), with the electronic board showing commodity prices 11. Close electronic commodities board, with Harmony Gold Mines and Anglo Gold showing a rise (in green) 12. Wide of commodity prices running on the electronic ticker 13. Wide setup of Tony Twine, senior economist at the Econometrix group, talking on the phone 14. Close of telephone 15. SOUNDBITE (English) Tony Twine, senior economist at the Econometrix group: "The fears that any cut in supply from South Africa, or any of the other producers in the world, might result in gold price rising, is probably unfounded, and that does not mean that the gold price will not rise, but be propelled rather by hedging activities in a time of great financial and economic uncertainty in major economies around the world." Kloof Gold Mine, Westonaria, Gauteng province, southwest of Johannesburg - 28 July 2011 16. Various of exterior of a non-working shaft rig at the Kloof gold mine STORYLINE: More than 250,000 South African gold miners went on strike on Thursday seeking higher wages and a cut of profits from soaring gold prices, a union representative said. The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) said they expect the industrial action to halt operations at four companies including Anglogold Ashanti, Harmony Gold and Goldfields. The miners want a 14 percent raise, Union General Secretary Frans Baleni said, because they want to see their share of the profits from high gold prices. The union said the striking gold miners would join more than 150-thousand other miners from the coal and diamond sectors, who began striking within the last week. Miner, Thandisizwe Jiya, told AP Television News he earns less than 600 US dollars (4,000 rand) a month. "The salary I''ve got, it''s little money. You can''t survive with that wage," he said. Baleni described miners'' work as "arduous" and said the fact that miners, who risked their health going underground, were paid less than manual labourers in the retail industry was "unfair". South Africa still remains one of the world''s top gold producers. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7a9b5d9894ca599ce7b56cab443e51d1 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 146 AP Archive
CAN 146 COPPER MINING BOOM IN SOUTH AFRICA
 
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(4 Jan 1964) **date is approximate** Copper mining boom brings affluence to town in Transvaale, South Africa You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/b39023336720280df2424e5c5d2fec4d Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 61 AP Archive
South Africa - Miners March
 
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Thousands of mineworkers marched on the Department of Mineral and Energy Affairs in Johannesburg on Saturday morning (16/7), demanding an improvement in safety conditions at work. At the front of the march, organised by the National Union of Mineworkers, were scores of disabled miners in wheelchairs. They were pushed by colleagues in central Johannesburg, to the department offices in Braamfontein. Most had been paralysed in mining accidents and several had lost one or more limbs. Others hobbled on crutches and walking sticks. The march took place on the eve of a Government-appointed commission of inquiry into the health and safety regulations in the mining industry. According to union figures, black mineworkers who spend 20 years underground face a 1 in 30 chance of being killed in a mining accident, and a 1 in 2 chance of being permanently disabled. Last year, 578 mineworkers died in mine accidents. A total of 8532 were seriously injured last year. Meanwhile, South Africa's largest labour federation demanded on Saturday that President Nelson Mandela's government back workers in disputes with employers acording to a Sunday Times report. Sam Shilowa, leader of the 1.2 million-strong Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU), made his plea as the country faces its largest strike since the all-race elections in April. More than 15,000 workers at retail giant Pick 'n Pay will stop work Tuesday following the breakdown of wage negotiations and outbreaks of violence between strikers and police at stores in the Johannesburg region. SHOWS: SOUTH AFRICA 16/7: JOHANNESBURG marchers and zoom-out to reveal a statue of mineworkers wheelchair-bound miners leading the march onlookers and marchers mine officials standing by protesters in a bus with posters reading "the right to refuse dangerous work" miners mine officials advancing to podium accepting memo and signing it mine official addressing the gathered group "as you all know, the question of safety and health in the mines is being addressed by a commission sitting in this building as of monday." cheering shouts of mandela! filling the air 2.55 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/0c24efa90949bb502336f9a1afc7bd0b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 44 AP Archive
South Africa Manganese Mining
 
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The Kalahari manganese fields, among one of the world's biggest and richest, has a relative newcomer; the new Tshipi Borwa mine owned by Tshipi Manganese Mining. With a 60-year mine life, and a 2.4 million tonne per annum capacity, Tshipi will be among the four largest South African sources of manganese, an irreplaceable ingredient in the manufacture of steel. CCTV's Julie Scheier reports
Views: 4944 CGTN Africa
South african coal mines
 
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More Details: http://www.pakistancrushers.com/contact.php Kendal Coal Mine, Mining Techno subsidiary of Canadieceived the mining licence for its Kendal opencast coal South African Coal South African Coal, Stanford University. Botswana’s Coal Roadmap, State. Electricity Access to the Poor: A study of South . South Africa, African Economic Outlook Jindal Africa, Kiepersol Product Jindal Africa is involved in the mining of Metallurgical Grade Anthracite Coal in South Africa.The Anthracite Coal from Kiepersol mine has low sulphur and phosphorus South Africa’s Mining Fiscal Regime: H1 2015 South Africa’s Mining Fiscal Regime: H1 2015 Synopsis Timetric’s South African fiscal regime covers the governing bodies, laws, licenses, rights and obligations The Social and Environmental Consequences of Coal Mining in Page 3 of 24 Introduction This case study focuses on the costs of the environmental and social effects of coal mining in South Africa, undertaken for export to the South African mining, coal, gold & base minerals. (Journal Get this from a library! South African mining, coal, gold & base minerals.. Sasol Produces and markets a variety of primary, intermediate and final chemical products (mining chemicals, fertilizer, explosives, tar and gases) to South African and Coal miners strike deal in South Africa, Al Jazeera English Coal companies in South Africa have signed a surprise wage deal with unions in an effort to avoid a wave of deadly illegal strikes that have rocked the country's gold Total agrees to sell South African coal subsidiary to Exxaro Total SA is to sell its Total Coal South Africa Proprietary Limited (TCSA) subsidiary to South African resources group Exxaro for $472 million. 29 Jul 2014 properties of bituminous coal of south africa, BINQ Mining Coal, Education, Chamber Of Mines. Most of South Africa’s coal is of a bituminous thermal grade; only two per cent is anthracite, and 1,6 per cent POST, MINING REHABILITATION, LAND USE AND POLLUTION AT The South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Sustainable Development in the life of coal mining in South Africa Limpitlaw, Aken, Lodewijks & Viljoen The Present South African Coal Mining Industry The Present South African Coal Mining Industry . To understand the dominance of coal as an energy source in South Africa, it is important to take a look at Glencore to cut 380 jobs at South African coal mine Glencore ([[GLCNF]], [[GLNCY]]) says it will cut ~380 jobs at its Optimum Coal subsidiary in South Africa after the closure of some operations at the mine. South African Mining Law, Mining Technology, TechnoMine Here is an edited version of a report that recently appeared on the Mail & Guardian online: The Italian owners of two granite firms are suing South Africa for €266 south african junior coal mining companies,Samda, South Samda, South African Mining Association , The South African Mining Development Association was started in 2000 as the markets for junior companies: On export Welcome to Slater Coal Marketing Slater Coal Marketing aspires to become South Africa's leading distributor of coal and anthracite. We source ROM from various sources, depending on our clients needs Methane release from South African coal mines 1 Methane release from south african coal mines Philip Lloyd i and Alan Cook ii Abstract The widely employed IPCC models for the release of methane from underground Company Profile: Continental Coal Company Profile Review of Operations. Continental Coal Limited (ASX:CCC/AIM:COOL) is a South African thermal coal producer with a portfolio of producing, development Finding solutions for South Africa’s coal, fired water and South African businesses, NGOs and government seek to address challenges in the water, stressed, coal producing country Coal production, from mining to power In South Africa, Renewables Vie With the Political Power of electricity comes from coal, as does almost half its liquid transport fuel. But South Africa is also blessed with abundant renewable energy resources, mainly in the The potential of coal wastes in South Africa The Journal of The South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 69 Introduction South Africa started to export coal in the early allAfrica.com: South Africa: Mining Licence Controversies In the midst of a global commodity price bust and a rapid Chinese economic slowdown, South African mining companies are struggling to keep shafts SOUTH AFRICAN COAL ROAD MAP,
Views: 90 vhvy dvain
Siemens South Africa on automation in South Africa
 
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EE Publishers' Chris Yelland interviews Siemens South Africa's Ralf Leinen on the impact of digitalisation and automation in South Africa, particularly in manufacturing and mining, as well as the education and skills needed in the automation industry. Jingle by cydon, licensed under CC BY 3.0
Views: 153 EE Publishers
South Africa’s Mine Trap
 
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Conditions in South Africa’s underground mines pose serious health risks for mine workers and their families. The country’s mine workers have the highest rate of tuberculosis (TB) of any working population in the world, constituting a health emergency.
Views: 3358 World Bank
🇿🇦 Gold found in South Africa mine's waste | Al Jazeera English
 
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In a single gold mine in South Africa, an expected $2.2 billion worth of gold can still be extracted from just one dump site's waste material. Using water cannons and chemical treatements, a single mine can hope to extract about 3 grams in every tonne. It may not sound like much but if there is 140 million tonnes of waste lying around - the numbers start adding up. High prices means all the effort that goes into sourcing the precious metal may well be worth it. Al Jazeera's Tania Page reports from Johannesburg. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 558062 Al Jazeera English
SOUTH AFRICA: GROWING ARMS INDUSTRY
 
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English/Nat The Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati arrives in South Africa today (Tuesday) amid speculation that South Africa could be supplying arms to his country. South Africa is well-known for its arms industry. Shunned for so long by the international community, it has developed a highly effective, manufacturing base. Now that it has been accepted back into the international fold, it's looking for markets for its wares. Ali Akbar Velayati's visit marks the new improved relations between South Africa and Iran. South Africa's already under diplomatic fire from the United States because of a plan to store Iranian oil in return for half the profits. Velayati is likely to face questions on the oil issue as well as arms links the two countries may have. It's also thought Iran is acting as a conduit to funnel arms to Muslims fighting in the former Yugoslavia. SOUND BITE: I don't think there is any hard evidence of Iranian arms going to the Bosnian Muslims, but there is a lot of circumstantial evidence, there is a lot of supposition that that's happening and it seems likely. SUPER CAPTION: Helmoed-Romer Heitmann, military expert The two-day official visit of the foreign minister will include talks with his South African counterpart Alfred Nzo. If any direct information about arms trade should emerge, the pressure is bound to increase. SOUND BITE: Some of the stuff they are buying on the black market - spares for the old American equipment. I believe the bulk of the Iranian equipment at the moment is coming from the Soviet Union, the former Soviet Union - Russia. They are supplying them with a lot of stuff mainly armoured vehicles. I believe they also sold them a licence to build some equipment. They have also acquired some equipment from the People's Republic of China and I believe they've got some missiles and some related equipment that they've been acquiring from North Korea. SUPER CAPTION: Helmoed-Romer Heitmann, military expert South Africa's expertise in arms manufacture makes it an important player in international politics. The visit of Velayati has served to highlight the new South African government's determination to forge an independent foreign policy. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/b7cd74c18db2d9bd73e1669870c297a8 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 713 AP Archive
Interview with South African President Zuma on miners' strike
 
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(27 Sep 2012) SHOTLIST 1. Mid of Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa: "This incident is an isolated incident. Unfortunate, an incident that we did not need, but it happened. I don't think it should be viewed as if now it is the kind of incident that will be an common occurrence in South Africa because it is not." 3. Mid of Zuma 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa: "We have the circumstances that are totally different from what it was during apartheid days. And you cannot therefore today think that this kind of an action will happen again because we have checks and balances in our democracy. The very fact that we have quickly moved to establish a judicial commission of inquiry to establish the facts and you'll also know that when this incident happened then entire society stood up immediately, the council of churches, the traditional leaders, the government every one of us was there to deal with the matter and we never saw that during apartheid days." 5. Mid of Zuma 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa: "No (Julius) Malema is not going to have any role (in solving problems around mining incident). Of course he took a chance to go and talk to the miners at a point when they were very vulnerable, but that could not happen. So it is not a major factor. He just happened to... for him to take a gap that he saw, but as you know we do not need that kind of thing, because that is not just talking in generalities, that was incitement." 7. Mid of Zuma 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa: "The Mali thing is a new kind of thing as a result of what happened in Libya. I think it has impacted very negatively to Mali and the matter is being discussed and we are ready to participate where it would be necessary for us to participate in terms of the AU and as well as in terms of the UN." 9. Mid of Zuma STORYLINE: South Africa's president says the mining unrest that captured international attention following the police killing of 34 striking miners will be resolved through negotiation. President Jacob Zuma told the Associated Press that the August 16 killings at the Lonmin PLC platinum mine in Marikana were an "isolated incident." He said the strikes which spread to other, mostly gold, mines were a direct consequence of the strike at Marikana and that they too would be resolved through negotiation. Zuma denied that the strikes revealed startling inequalities in post-apartheid South Africa, saying it was not a problem that has "arisen now," blaming the problem on the legacy of apartheid. Zuma also said Julius Malema, the former head of the African National Congress Youth League, wouldn't have "any role" in solving the problems surrounding Marikana. The former youth league leader has encouraged strikes in South Africa's mining industry. Referring to Mali, Zuma said South Africa is "ready to participate where it would be necessary for us to participate in terms of the AU and as well as in terms of the UN." =========================================================== Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: [email protected] (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d63a7b3b14843c6d71ecad19994de9d1 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 494 AP Archive
SOUTH AFRICA: GOLD MINERS RESCUED
 
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English/Nat Nine South African gold miners have been rescued alive after four days entombed in a collapsed mine shaft. The survivors of the accident emerged more or less unharmed from their ordeal but were taken to hospital for examination. Four others are known to have died in the accident, and hopes are fading for two other severely injured men still trapped beneath the surface. After four days of clawing through tons of rock and earth, success. Late on Thursday evening, rescue workers at the gold mine in Orkney broke through a wall of earth and reached the nine miners trapped more than a mile below the surface. To cheers and clapping, the men were carried out of the mine shaft on stretchers and taken to a waiting ambulance. Rescuers had tunnelled for four days to reach the men, trapped after a rockfall deep inside the African Rainbow Minerals mine. The agonizing inch-by-inch rescue effort captured the nation's attention in a country built on mining, where hundreds die every year deep in the earth's recesses. But even as the nine were brought to the surface, hopes were fading for two severely injured miners still trapped. Four other died immediately in the rockfall and the two are thought to be lying close to their decomposing bodies, out of the immediate reach of the rescue team. Most of the workers in South Africa's lucrative goldmines are poor blacks and the depth of the mines make the job particularly hazardous. An earth tremor is believed to have caused this latest rockfall. 200 rescuers, many from other mining companies, worked eight-hour shifts to dig through the 300 tons of dirt and rock separating them from the trapped miners. The rescuers first made contact with the miners on Thursday morning and were able to pass food and water to them before they were freed. The two injured workers were lying about 35 metres away, too severely hurt to travel when the survivors made their way toward the main shaft after the rockfall. They had been without food or water since Monday. Hopes for their survival have all but dimmed. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I feel relieved but obviously still sad that we couldn't get everybody out, but we should be thankful for what we have." Q: "When you say everybody out are you talking about the dead bodies still there?" A: "Yes, yes, we are not going to get them alive." SUPER CAPTION: Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs The Orkney mine, which dates from the 1950s, was the scene of one of the nation's worst mining accidents. One hundred and four men died in 1995 when a mine train fell into an elevator shaft on a carriage full of miners. The mine was then owned by mining giant Anglo-American. In January 1998 the mine was sold to black investors under the new government's philosophy of empowering the previously oppressed majority. Five miners have died there since - until this latest tragedy. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/98cee3dd53941e559ff8b4151db6579a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 551 AP Archive
South African Mining Disaster (1960)
 
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South Africa. Various shots of crowds strolling along a suburban road after having visited the Coalbrook Colliery where four hundred miners died. GV. Angle shot of main shaft of colliery, pan to pit head buildings which are surrounded by rescue workers. Various shots of spectators leaning on fence and walking round perimeter of mine. MS. Four Africans, two wrapped in blankets. GV. of the fan house at the mine. (Orig. Neg.) FILM ID:2936.08 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 2135 British Pathé
Reports of the largest diamond in the world found in South Africa
 
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1. Tracking shot in the corridor of the Diamond Centre 2. Various set up shots of Ernest Blom, President of World Federation of Diamond Bourses, evaluating a diamond 3. SOUNDBITE (English): Ernest Blom, President of World Federation of Diamond Bourses: "Put this into perspective, this is a Cullinan diamond. The Cullinan diamond was 3,100 plus carats and it was the biggest and largest gem quality diamond ever found and ever has been found. If this diamond in fact exists and it's a six-thousand carat diamond, you can imagine A: how big it is and how priceless it would be if it is a gem-quality diamond. What I am intrigued about as a diamantier, is actually to go along and have look at the diamond, have look at the colour, have look at the purity and to hold something as unique as that, if it's true, in my hands." 4. Set up of Two point Five group Chairman Brett Jolly 5. SOUNDBITE (English): Brett Jolly, Group Chairman,Two point Five: "About that. (Picks up a glass ashtray to indicate size). That should give you a fairly good idea. It's sort of there (indicates with one hand over ashtray). The picture that I've got, it's sort of a light green colour and there's a cell phone by the side of it . I've got the picture here actually. It's sort of yeah, about that. (Holds up cell phone and ashtray)." 6. Cutaway of Brett's Hands 7. SOUNDBITE (English): Brett Jolly, Group Chairman,Two point Five: "Totally, absolutely, totally unbelievable. The Cape Times got the story, I don't know if you know that, yesterday, and apparently they phoned the Diamond Commission and an unnamed person in the Diamond Commission said 'highly unbelievable'. And I said to my friend it's not highly unbelievable, it's bloody impossible, you just don't expect this type of thing." 8. Close-up of the picture taken of the diamond 9. Jolly on the phone 10. SOUNDBITE (English): Brett Jolly, Group Chairman,Two point Five: "I am a property developer and obviously it's nice to have a big stone that's worth a great deal of money. But it is not going to change our lives overnight. The thing needs to follow its due process and in terms of the current law, it must be reported to the relevant authorities, it must go to the mining commission and so on, so there's a whole process. And I think people are trying to maybe rush that process in terms of a few hours when in actual fact it's probably a few days if not a week, to get the whole thing done the way it should be done." 11. Set up of Jewelry Council of South Africa Executive Director Leslie Milner 12. SOUNDBITE (English): Leslie Milner, Executive Director, Jewelry Council of South Africa: "It seems to be a perfect octahedral shape, the colour seems to have a greenish tinge which we do see in diamonds. They are a common thing which you do see. But just my gut feeling is the shape is too good to be true, it seems such a perfect shape. But without actually seeing the stone I can't really comment. I would love to see it, I'd love to see the real thing. If it is a real diamond it would be something really amazing." 13. Various of charts on wall displaying types and different cuts of diamonds STORYLINE: Mystery surrounds reports on Tuesday of a diamond twice the size of the world's largest stone apparently unearthed by a small South African mining company, with industry experts saying the claim still needs to be verified. Brett Jolly, property developer and shareholder of the unnamed mining company, said the stone of about 7,000 carats was found at their operation in the North-West province on Monday afternoon. "Totally, absolutely, totally unbelievable," said Jolly, looking a bit shell-shocked. Experts who talked to AP Television said it would be an incredible discovery if true. Keyword-wacky You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/bb62d6d03aedd6b24793dce001e51e21 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 8626 AP Archive
SOUTH AFRICA: GOLD MINING
 
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English/Nat International gold sales recently plunged the price of the precious metal to a 22-year low. Despite protests from all quarters the sales are set to continue leaving the future of tens of thousands of South African miners hanging in the balance. This week South Africa's second largest gold miner, Gold Fields Ltd, announced that a strike against retrenchments at one of its mines may spread to other sites. When Britain sold 25 tons of gold recently, it set the price plummeting and some of South Africa's less profitable mines were forced to give notice of lay offs. Britain is scheduled to sell another 100 tons of gold by the end of this year. Recent protests by both South African mine companies and mineworkers unions appear to have fallen on deaf ears. The South African National Union of Mineworkers warned that if the gold price remains below 260 dollars an ounce, it would mean that 80-thousand gold miners would lose their jobs.. It's estimated that each miner supports another 10 people, so this loss could affect around 800-thousand South Africans livelihoods. Joe Funga has worked at the West Driefontein Mine for 17 years. A member of the mainly white Mineworkers Union, he has already made enquiries about his union's programme for laid off miners. Like other miners who live in company houses, Funga only pays 1.70 dollars a month to live in his house with his wife and two children. And if his job goes, so does his home. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I'm not feeling very happy about it because the whole issue is, what do you call it, got an effect on our families and got an effect on the people in the shafts, from a miner to an omsetter (fitter and turner) and the artisans as well." SUPER CAPTION: Joe Funga, Gold Miner Funga starts work at 4a-m where he is in charge of three gangs of about 10 miners each. For them the mine's tunnels are their world and they've long accepted the inhospitable conditions. It also provides them with a livelihood in a country wracked by unemployment. For at least eight hours a day Funga joins his colleagues and descends 800 metres under the earth where they retrieve the rock that produces gold. Since July 15th workers at another mine in the Free State province workers have downed tools and brought production to a complete halt. They are protesting the imminent laying off of 600 workers. Next week a neighbouring mine, Beatrix may also join the strike in support of its colleagues. For another Gold Mine it seems that it's already too late. E-R-P-M east of Johannesburg, is set to close and 5-thousand workers will lose their jobs. Back at Crown Mine one of Funga's workmates, Sabata Moeane is a member of the mainly black National Union of Mineworkers. Recently he's also been investigating alternative employment possibilities should he be laid off. The National Union of Mineworkers is suggesting ways of laid-off miners becoming self-employed should they lose their jobs. With South Africa's high rate of unemployment, it may be the only solution for people like Moeane and Funga. Moeane has been working on the mine for ten years and lives near the mine site with his wife and four children, also in a company house. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I think at this point in time we are really in a catastrophic position because the gold price has declined tremendously and that can cost our jobs." SUPER CAPTION: Sabata Moeane, Gold Miner Miners such as Joe Funga and Sabata Moeane can only hope that their jobs will survive the the current Gold crisis. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f3e34884df50feeb26c6dcf9e589131b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 1238 AP Archive
South Africa's 270,000-member miners union strike over safety
 
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SHOTLIST 1. Close of South African Communist party flag being carried by singing marchers 2. Close up of mine worker dancing in the street 3. Wide of striking mine workers listening to leaders speech 4. Mid of mine workers with banner that reads: "The stronger the Union, safer the workplace." 5. Close of mineworker sitting down, singing 6. Close of mine worker holding banner and singing and dancing 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox pop, (name not given) striking miner: "Every year there are fatalities, every year, every year" 8. Close of tilt up marchers in wheelchairs, chanting 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox pop, (name not given) striking miner: "Those families, the families of those guys who die, they cannot receive their father's blessing - they are going to cry." 10. Tilt down striking mine worker, removing his helmet wiping his brow, and mimicking digging with a shovel 11. Cutaway of dancing mine worker STORYLINE: Thousands of striking miners protested in Johannesburg on Tuesday, over safety and working conditions in South African mines - where officials estimate one miner dies nearly every day. Around 40-thousand miners joined the colourful march on the Chamber of Mines, in South Africa's capital on Tuesday, many singing and holding brightly coloured banners in support of the Union. "The stronger the Union, safer the workplace," one banner read. One striking miner told AP Television "every year there are fatalities, every year." The one day strike was called by the 270-thousand member National Union of Mineworkers to draw attention to safety concerns in a country where the rate of deaths among miners underground is increasing. Many miners were transported in from rural areas by bus, according to the employer's organisation that includes industry leaders AngloGold Ashanti, Gold Fields, Harmony Gold, Anglo Platinum, Impala Platinum and Lonmin. The miners were expected to present Chamber officials with a memorandum outlining their health and safety concerns during the march. South African President, Thabo Mbeki, has ordered that all mines undergo safety audits and around 50 mines were shut down by the government in one week, recently, due to unsafe working conditions. Chamber officials did not comment on the strike directly, but pointed to a joint statement released last week, after a meeting with the National Union of Mineworkers. The two sides agreed at the meeting the protest strike would be on a "no work, no pay basis." The statement acknowledged "there is much to be done to drastically reduce the number of accidents and fatalities on the mines." In October, 3,200 miners from Harmony Gold, were trapped more than a mile underground for two days after a pressurised air pipe exploded. The miners escaped unscathed, but the accident brought international attention to South Africa's mine safety issues. As of the end of September, some 226 miners had been killed on the job, the mineworkers' union said, compared to 199 in all of 2006. The problems, compounded by the country having the deepest mines in the world, often are seen as a hangover from the former white apartheid regime, which was seen as unconcerned about the safety, poor pay and dire living conditions of black miners. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1d24b43d5edbe2825bcfd1f25ae2dbf0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 147 AP Archive
South Africa Mining Indaba: Mining Companies Urged To Invest Staff Health Care
 
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Healthcare featured for the first time at the annual Mining Indaba taking place in South Africa. Mining companies have been urged to invest more in improving healthcare services in the communities they operate. The recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa had a huge impact on mining operations in the region. Mining remains an important revenue stream for African economies. Sumitra Nydoo reports from Cape Town
Views: 142 CGTN Africa
Prospecting and mining rights applications to be suspended
 
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South Africa says it will suspend granting and renewing new applications for prospecting and mining rights. The decision will be implemented pending a court case to review new mining laws. The move could hamper growth and investment in South Africa's mining sector, which is already beset by policy uncertainty and labour strife. The Chamber of Mines is in court to prevent the implementation of the new mining charter, which proposed raising the level of shares blacks should own in mining firms. It believes mining companies were not properly consulted about its revisions. Mining shares fell to more than one-year lows after the revised version was released in June, giving resource firms one year to meet a new 30 percent minimum for black ownership. Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ow.ly/Zvqj30aIsgY Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cgtnafrica/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cgtnafrica
Views: 231 CGTN Africa
1959 SOUTH AFRICA TRAVELOGUE   LAND OF ENDEAVOR 50214
 
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Presented by Caltex, this 1959 profile of South Africa presents an outline of South African history is followed by descriptions of the Union as it existed in that decade: the Boers and agriculture; measures to advance the Bantu; the Cape Malayas and Indians; mining and industrial developments. New towns. The film completely ignores apartheid. At mark 1:20 is how South Africa came to existence. In 1652, small group of Dutch colonies established the first European settlement at the southern tip of the land. Renamed by the Portuguese from Cape of Storm to Cape of Good Hope. At mark 1:45 is the vast, wild and unexplored world. There is a hippo, elephant, and different animal varieties. At mark 2:02, is mass migration to the South Africa. At mark 2:30, the soil is tilled. At mark 2:52, the map of South Africa is seen. At this mark, all the states united and become South Africa. At mark 3:15, the flags are seen. At mark 3:40, a farmer from the Orange Free State talks about farming in the country. At mark 4:05, is his maize plantation. Maize is used for powder, and gun powder. At mark 4:44, sheep are seen. More wools are harvested form them. At mark 5:15 is indigenous cattle. Today, they have become a chief source of beef and leather. At mark 5:40, a lady is seen harvesting grapes. At mark 6:06 is the wine making company. At mark 6:25, dancers are dancing. Fruits of many varieties are produced and exported as seen at mark 7:08. Apart from the city’s fruits, thousands of citrus are exported each year. At mark 7:25 is seen a plantation for orange. At mark 7:33, train transport these fruits. Banana, pawpaw, sugar cane and lots are also produced at mark 7:50. Now lets see timber at mark 8:08. Timber is also produced in the country as seen at mark 8:15, supplying almost 2/3 of the country’s need. At mark 8:30, lumbers are seen. At mark 9:10, it is seen how the land has been wasting away, and losing its fertility but today there is proper care of the soil. At mark 9:40 is a Bantu doctor, Dr. Joseph Massuka. He talks on modern surgery and old medicines. At mark 10:30, the ancient life is seen. A warrior is seen making a spear for ceremonial use. At mark 10:50 is the Bantu village. At mark 11:36 are children of the city. At mark 11:44, they are singing. At mark 12:03, the bantu kids are at school and are taught on ways of their culture. Every year there’s more bantu student taking a higher education and getting new professions at mark 12:27 like teaching and doctors. At mark 13:00, the bantu are dancing in their culture. At mark 13:50 is a man who runs a small printing business. He talks about his other people and how they’ve been brought up to work in various profession line. Fishing is seen at mark 14:45. Frozen foods are also exported. At mark 15:33, the member of the queen’s carnival is seen. At mark 16:00, Joseph Talip talks on the ancient religious faith. At mark 16:28, a man is seen making cap. Craftsmen are seen at mark 16:45. Dancers are also seen at mark 17:10. At mark 17:40, the Indian population mostly concentrated in the town is seen. An Indian shop is seen at mark 17:48. At mark 18:10 are places for religions of any type. At mark 18:20 are old India customs. At mark 19:00, is a man in his fourth year at a university of economics. He talks on standard of living of the country. New plants, new roads, trains, dams, water system and how all this existed as raw material for eachother. At mark 20:05, workers and production line are developing. At mark 20:42, manufacturers are conducting tests on their products. At mark 21:05, industrial future of South Africa is talked on. At mark 21:35 is a mining house in Johannesburg. Peter Weisberg a geologist here talks on gold mining in Johannesburg. At mark 22:08, the mining site is seen. He talked on difficulties, as seen at mark 22:33. The miners are mining at mark 22:50. At mark 23:08, gold bars are been transported from the site. At mark 23:15, is Uranium mining. At mark 23:28, is coal, iron and manganese mining. At mark 23:48, the ore where these resources are processed is seen. At mark 23:55, steel is been processed. Copper is also mined for power lines at mark 24:22. Also comes Crimore in which million is mined. Titanium at mark 24:48 is also mined. At mark 24:55 is a site for mining diamond from the desert site. At mark 25:36, these precious stones are sorted. A diamond mine at Kimberly is seen at mark 25:55. At mark 26:45, a beach is seen where people are enjoying their leisure. At mark 27:18, the wildlife is seen. Modern life in South Africa strips in to align with older culture. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1863 PeriscopeFilm
kleinzee south africa - diamond mining tour- seal colony - diamond coast
 
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die ursprünglich boomende Stadt Kleinzee an der Diamanten Küste ist nachdem DeBeer die Mine nicht mehr betreibt, zu einem ruhigen Flecken an de Küste geworden.Dennoch ist das Gebiet noch Speergebiet, in das man nur mit einem Permit betreten kann
Views: 7320 Jens Friedrich
RR7734A SOUTH AFRICA NEW TRENDS IN MINING + CUTS
 
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RR7734A SOUTH AFRICA NEW TRENDS IN MINING + CUTS Vital new developments are taking place in South Africa's prosperous mining industry. Unsightly tips of goldmine waste in Johannesburg are being reprocessed in a 175 million-dollar project to extract even more gold from the material, as well as uranium. Mining engineers have also pioneered a special drilling unit that can be taken anywhere to bore a rescue shaft directly down to trapped miners. Film: Rev – Sound: Mag/SOF – Colour– Available in HD You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9213c55a5e5c8d835689ced59ccad387 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 4 AP Archive
SOUTH AFRICA: MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR DEAD MINE WORKERS
 
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English/Nat In the wake of South Africa's latest mining disaster in which 104 miners were killed last week, international experts are discussing ways in which to improve safety on mines and in factories. The international conference hosted by the National Occupational Safety Association will continue discussing the issue today (Thursday). Yesterday (Wednesday) miners and the families of the dead gather on mine property for a memorial service. It's exactly a week since the Vaal Reefs Gold Mine accident in which a mine locomotive plunged down a shaft and crushed a lift carrying the night shift workers. President Nelson Mandela, who visited the scene on Monday, called on the public to observe a national day of mourning yesterday (Wednesday.) Since gold was discovered in South Africa in the 1880s the industry has relied on a cheap labour force, mainly black men from the rural areas of the country and from neighbouring states. While conditions have improved slowly over the years, it took the installation of Mandela's government last May to give the mining industry a friendly nudge in the direction of better worker relations. An inquiry set up by Mandela to investigate the disaster needs to examine who or what was to blame for the accident. But the focus is very firmly on ensuring better safety on the mines. SOUND BITE: "It definitely is a tragedy for South Africa. We at Nosa must look at ourselves and have a look at when the findings of the Vaal Reefs tragedy come out. We need to have a look at what happened and see if we ourselves can improve in anyway possible to pre-empt such things happening again." SUPER CAPTION: Bryan Keague, operations manager of the National Occupational Safety Association SOUND BITE: "It was terrible and we are sorry that people died and I think if stricter measures were taken the accident could have been averted." SUPER CAPTION: Boney Mogotsi, occupational health officer The accident came at a time too when the world's largest gold producer seems to be losing it's grip on the market - the gold mines shares on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange were down 39% as compared to the same time last year. The main reason is that South Africa is still mining the same mines as it was 100 years ago and miners are now having to go deeper into the ground to get the gold. The result has been a rise in labour costs and a drop in safety standards. Clearly the mine owners must take a long hard look at safety as they try to negotiate the minefield of creeping competition even within Africa. SOUND BITE: "Well, the mine disaster actually puts us in a position we should emphasize the need for safety and I believe that probably if the safety was viewed with concern, it should be taking that mine disaster could not probably have happened." SUPER CAPTION: Dr William Sakari, director of Occupational Health Safety Services, Kenya. Political changes and a more labour-friendly government means that this mine disaster will be thoroughly probed. South Africa's Mineral and Energy Affairs Minister Pik Botha visited the mine last week and has added his voice to the call for an enquiry. SOUND BITE: "It is obvious that there will have to be a very proper and thorough investigation when this matter - it is impossible at least for me to in the time that I have here - it is too complex. We will have to get a very proper enquiry." SUPER CAPTION: Pik Botha, South Africa's Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs. President Nelson Mandela visited the mine himself on Monday but steered clear of blaming either workers or management. He simply went personally to investigate and to offer his condolences to the workers. His donation of part of his salary to You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ecc0e90f31ede7b16f068859bce608b6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 124 AP Archive
Sierra Leone Pastor finds 706 Carat Diamond which could be the 10th Largest EVER
 
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A Christian pastor working in a Sierra Leone mine has found a 706-carat diamond, which could be the tenth largest ever found. The precious stone was found by Emmanuel Momoh, who was working in the Kono region, in the east of the country. It will be sold in Sierra Leone in a 'transparent' bidding process to benefit the country, according to a government statement. It read: 'A 706-carat diamond was presented to President Dr Ernest Bai Koroma yesterday evening. 'Receiving the diamond President Koroma thanked the chief and his people for not smuggling the diamond out of the country.' Diamond expert Paul Zimnisky said it could be 'between the 10th and 15th largest gem-diamonds ever recovered' and such a find is very rare in a small mine. He said: 'Most recent exceptional diamond discoveries have been made by large commercial miners that mine very large volumes of kimberlite ore and process it with advanced equipment. 'Artisanal mining tends to produce smaller, lower quality diamonds because the diamonds suffer breakage and erosion.' Zimnisky said the stone would likely be sold outside Sierra Leone, despite the government's assertion, for better access to buyers. Without a professional assessment of the diamond's potential flaws and colouring it is impossible to value the stone. However, a polished stone cut from the Jonker, which is the 10th largest gem-diamond ever recovered until now at 726 carats, will go on sale in Hong Kong in May. A single 25-carat portion is likely to sell for $2.2 million to $3.6 million (£1.78 million to £2.75 million), or $88,000 to $144,000 for a single carat, Zimnisky said. A 1,111-carat diamond was discovered at a mine in Botswana in 2015, the biggest find for more than a century. That gem is second in size only to the Cullinan diamond which was unearthed in South Africa in 1905, at 3,106 carats uncut, according to the Cape Town Diamond Museum. The Cullinan was cut into several gems, including two set into the sceptre and crown of the British Crown Jewels. Historically, Sierra Leone has had a controversial role in the diamond industry. The sale of 'blood diamonds' helped finance civil wars across Africa in the 1990s and often funded military dictatorships on a continent that the London Diamond Bourse estimates provides 65 percent of the world's diamonds. Rebels allowed traders to exploit diamond mines and ship the gems abroad via Liberia. In one of the most notorious cases, former Liberian warlord Charles Taylor was found guilty of supporting the rebels in exchange for diamonds mined by slave labour. The district where the 706-carat diamond was discovered is where US-Belgian businessman Michel Desaedeleer, accused of enslavement and diamond trafficking during Sierra Leone's civil war, is alleged to have committed his crimes. He died in jail in September before he could stand trial. The death toll from Sierra Leone's civil war is estimated at 120,000. The country has a population of roughly six million people, making it one of Africa's deadliest conflicts in recent history. Music: "Artifact" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Blog: https://patrynworldlatestnews.blogspot.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/patryn.worldlatestnews
Views: 154573 PatrynWorldLatestNew
Breaking News | Tango renews Oena mining license in South Africa for nine years, terminates Txape...
 
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Breaking News | Tango renews Oena mining license in South Africa for nine years, terminates Txapemba agreement in Angola Breaking News | Tango renews Oena mining license in South Africa for nine years, terminates Txapemba agreement in Angola Tango Mining Limited has announced that its subsidiary, African Star Minerals Limited, has received confirmation from the Department of Mineral Resources, Republic of South Africa. Its mining right for the Oena Diamond Mine has been renewed for a further period of nine years. The renewal has been granted in terms of the applicable sections of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act. Oena is 8,800 hectares in size and covers a 4.8 kilometre  wide strip along a 15 km length of the lowe... SUBSCRIBE To Our Channel : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPMjaOmdSqkcKmrntN5TF4Q Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/World-Breaking-News-1801911953358902/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/trinhhuuminhly Google+ : https://plus.google.com/u/0/101746655803030079868 Pinterest : https://www.pinterest.com/adanjanuzai/ Wedsite : http://www.bbc.com/news Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/world_breaking_news_tv/ Source : http://c.newsnow.co.uk/A/2/933662952?-: Thanks For Watching Video. Please SUBSCRIBE
Views: 14 Breaking News 24/7
SOUTH AFRICA: DIAMOND MINING EXPERTS CONFERENCE
 
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English/Nat Mining experts from around the world have begun meeting in Pretoria for a conference which they hope will result in African governments agreeing to legislate against trade in "blood diamonds" which benefits wars and rebel groups in Africa. The three-day conference, is the last in a series of meetings held throughout the international diamond world. It coincides with an increase in a new world conscience in the diamond trade. The United Nations has already placed a ban on diamonds originating from war-torn Sierra Leone which find their way onto the world market through other countries. That country was represented by its Deputy Director of Mines Usman Boie Kamara who announced his country would soon implement its own measures against "conflict diamonds". SOUNDBITE: (English) "Within the next week or so we hope to have our own certification regime in place and we would then apply to the UN to lift the sanctions on the exportation of diamonds using this certification regime which we would then have in place." SUPERCAPTION: Deputy Director of Mines in Sierra Leone, Usman Boie Kamara SOUNDBITE: (English): "I am extremely confident that it will be achieved because we have all the role players in the diamond industry worldwide as well as all the governments of Africa and Southern Africa getting together to combat it with a common cause and that is to promote the use of diamonds for the prosperity and benefit of all the peoples of Africa." SUPERCAPTION: Ernest Blom, Executive member of the World Diamond Council You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/cb54fa995b808a489348eb99e6fd13d5 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 5945 AP Archive
SOUTH AFRICA: GOLD MINING  (V)
 
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English/Nat VOICED BY: L. BATES International gold sales have recently plunged the price of the precious metal to a 22-year low. Despite protests from all quarters the sales are set to continue leaving the future of tens of thousands of South African miners hanging in the balance. This week South Africa's second largest gold miner, Gold Fields Ltd, announced that a strike against retrenchments at one of its mines may spread to all other sites. (0.02) All is not well in the gold mining industry. (0.06) With the market in free fall, there is little demand for the precious metal. (0.12) A mile underground the ramifications of the market collapse continues to reverberate. (0.17) South African miners have been hardest hit by this dramatic down turn. (0.22) Across the country mines have been forced to close as workers go on strike protesting about the imminent lay off of thousands of miners. (0.31) "I think at this point in time we are really in a catastrophic position because the gold price has declined tremendously and that can cost our jobs." Sabata Moeane, Gold Miner (0.52) As industrialised nations sell off their gold reserves the price of bullion continues to fall. (0.58) Recent protests by miners seems to have fallen on deaf ears with Britain announcing it will sell more than one hundred tons of gold by the end of the year. (1.08) Gold is no longer the glamour metal it once was. (1.12) It is estimated that if the price remains below two hundred and sixty dollars an ounce it could mean the end of some eighty thousand mining jobs. (1.22) VISION ENDS You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/45802a3629504fe5e3b5530ce52fd637 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 27 AP Archive
Gold In Johannesburg (1962)
 
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Johannesburg, South Africa. Gold is one of the most desired metals. Johannesburg is a stronghold regarding gold mining. L/S of Johannesburg, L/S from a high angle of modern tower blocks in the city. L/S of people walking down the street. M/S of a stone mason lifting a block. L/S of a tall modern building. L/S of a lady looking at a flower stall, C/U of a man lifting a bouquet of roses out from the stall. Various shots of parks in Johannesburg, one has an ornamental statue of Springboks jumping over a pool. Various views of the huge gold slag heaps including a C/U. M/S of the interior of a gold mine with various shots of miners drilling. C/U of another miner scraping the side of the mine. M/S of two miners wheeling a big truck, M/S of black and white miners shovelling stone into it. M/S of a miner driving a truck. L/S of the mine at Blyvooruitzicht. M/S of the wheels turning, M/S as the truck is pulled up the rails. C/U of a miner watching. C/U of the wheel, M/S as the stone is poured onto a conveyor belt, M/S as it comes out. L/S of the site with the trains going up and down, a miner is stood in the foreground looking at it. M/S of a man putting the gold in a furnace to be smelted. M/S of a crucible full of smelted gold as it is removed from the furnace, it is held in very long tongs. M/S of the man removing it, he is wearing a protective hood. L/S as two men pour the gold from the crucible into ingot moulds. M/S as one of the men lifts his mask and wipes his face. M/S of the gold as it is poured into the mould, various shots of the men pouring the gold in. C/U of the ingot moulds, one of them is cooling one is still steaming. M/S of a trolley full of gold ingots in a vault, two men wheel the trolley out, another man shuts the door after them. M/S as the ingots are loaded into the vault. C/U of the ingots as they are put in the vault. Exterior - L/S of Johannesburg, the camera pans across to show the whole city. FILM ID:165.14 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 4195 British Pathé
Diamond Mining In South Africa (1960)
 
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Unissued / Unused material. Diamond mining in Oranjemund, South West Africa. Aerial shot Oranjemund. Various shots massive conveyor machines. Pan along conveyor belts at mining building. Interior MS sorting machines. MS large earth moving machine. MS group of people looking on. Various shots excavator as it digs up the earth and deposits it in a lorry. Various shots rotary excavator at work. Various shots Harry Oppenheimer addressing a meeting. CU stones passing along conveyor belt where they are being washed. MS two workmen sorting the stones. MS mine buildings. CU large pile of diamonds on table including three large stones. FILM ID:3014.17 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 774 British Pathé
South Africa first African country to legalise commercial drones
 
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A new industry is taking off in South Africa, as drones are being used in everything from growing crops to making films. It's the only country in Africa that has legalised commercial drones. Al Jazeera's Fahmida Miller reports.
Views: 1301 Al Jazeera English
SOUTH AFRICA: ORKNEY: GOLD MINE ACCIDENT 56 BODIES RECOVERED
 
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English/Nat Searchers have now retrieved 56 bodies from the wreckage of a gold mine accident in Orkney, South Africa. The mine's owners, Anglo American, said no-one had survived the disaster and the country's most powerful union has accused them of gross negligence. By late Friday, searchers working 2,300 metres (1.4 miles) underground had pulled more than 56 bodies from a gold mine elevator that plunged down a shaft late on Wednesday night. The mine confirmed that there were no survivors among at least 100 gold miners in the two-floor elevator carriage that fell 500 yards (meters) after a locomotive dropped on it. The bodies of the miners had been recovered by rescue teams that cut into the smashed carriage. Almost 50 more were believed to still be in the wreckage. Workers wearing face masks and rubber gloves carried blanket-wrapped bodies on stretchers from a shaft elevator to waiting ambulances. Many workers at the mine came from neighboring countries or far away regions of South Africa, and the company said the switchboard was jammed with calls from relatives inquiring about their loved ones. Only a few of the 56 bodies recovered so far have been identified. The accident occurred when a mine locomotive went into a tunnel closed to locomotive traffic, broke through safety barriers and plunged down the shaft. It landed on an elevator carriage full of workers finishing the night shift, snapping the cable to send the carriage crashing to the bottom of the shaft. Officials said government investigators had questioned the driver of the locomotive, who was not in the vehicle when it fell into the shaft. President Nelson Mandela declared a day of mourning next week and promised speedy action on an upcoming government report on mine safety. Addressing a press conference later on Friday the most powerful trade union federation in South Africa slammed the mine's owners. SOUNDBITE: 'The blame should be placed before the mine bosses. And secondly we are saying that we don't believe that it was the first time that there has been a breach of health and safety. It's only that this time the result was tragic.' SUPER CAPTION: Sam Shilowa, General Secretary C.O.S.A.T.U. (Congress of South Africa Trade Union) South Africa is the world's leading gold producer and has some of the deepest mines. Accidents occur frequently and usually cause fatalities. SOUNDBITE: 'The key focus is that the sort of things were supposed to have been in place were not there and I think the mine bosses should be able to explain to us how come this sort of thing has been happening. SUPER CAPTION: Sam Shilowa, General Secretary C.O.S.A.T.U. (Congress of South Africa Trade Union) However, Anglo American has remained mum on possible causes of the tragedy. The driver of the deadly locomotive was apparently heavily sedated in hospital and the press were not allowed to speak to him. Anglo American regional manager Dick Fischer did speak to the press however - updating the progress being made with the rescue operation. SOUNDBITE: 'There is certainly no chance of any survivors. As we said yesterday, the bottom deck was most badly damaged. We have taken all of the remains of the people out of the top deck - it is completely empty and we have made the first cut into the bottom deck. We have taken four stretchers out of the bottom deck. ' SUPERCAPTION: Dick Fischer, Regional Manager, Anglo- American It is clear that the bodies in the lower deck of the cage have been mangled beyond recognition as grisly parcels not resembling any human form were brought to the surface. The nation's worst mining disaster occurred in 1960, when 437 workers were killed when trapped underground in a coal mine south of Johannesburg. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/99577a3eff8900a450910173bbc78f24 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 508 AP Archive
SABC/TNA Business Briefing on Mining Lekgotla.
 
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DISCUSSION ON HOW MINING LEKGOTLA WILL ENSURE MINING INDUSTRY PUTS SOUTH AFRICA FIRST
Views: 114 SABC Digital News
South African police find large explosives cache
 
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(30 Apr 2010) 1. Police line, police vehicles, onlookers, in street of house where explosives were found 2. Police forensic officers opening boxes of seized commercial explosives, on veranda of house where they were found 3. Various close ups of cardboard boxes of mine explosives 4. Forensic officer taking explosives out of a box 5. Explosives on the ground 6. Close of explosives on the ground 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Perumal Naidoo, Police Commissioner for Gauteng province: "We did some investigation, we have some information, and we found some of these explosives on ATM crime scenes. And we are satisfied that these are criminal elements that are purely dealing with commercial crimes, like ATM bombings, but we'll follow up all other aspects to ensure that it is not being used or will be used for any other crime." 8. Forensic police officers unpacking the boxes of explosives 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Perumal Naidoo, Police Commissioner for Gauteng province: "Well, the World Cup will be safe. We assure you the World Cup will be safe. And there's no doubt about it. That's the confidence that I am portraying to the whole world." (Reporter: Despite the large find of explosives?) "Despite the large find of explosives." 10. Tilt up from bathroom where the explosives were found to police outside the window unpacking the boxes 11. Ransacked interior of the house where explosives were found 12. Two suspects seated in the back of a police vehicle 13. Police officers outside the house 14. SOUNDBITE (English) vox pop, Ishma Mokholane, school boy: "So now they want to kill us, you see, they want to kill the people so no one can have the fun of watching the World Cup." 15. SOUNDBITE (English) vox pop, Kenalemang, school girl: "I feel very angry and sad. It's so scary, it's very scary." 16. Wide of police vehicle and police outside crime scene STORYLINE: South African police said on Friday they had found nearly 3 tons (2.49 metric tons) of commercial explosives in a house in southern Johannesburg. Gauteng Provincial Police Commissioner Perumal Naidoo told Associated Press Television News that an 18-year-old woman and a 22-year-old man, both of Zimbabwean nationality, had been arrested during Friday's raid. He added that officers were acting on a tip-off. Police think the explosives had been stolen from a shipping container depot and would be used by a criminal syndicate to blow up cash machines. The find may alarm some people in view of the forthcoming World Cup that starts in June, but Naidoo was quick to point out that the explosives were destined for use in robberies, and were typical of the kind used in recent attacks on ATM machines, in which criminals blow up the machines to get the money out. "We assure you the World Cup will be safe. And there's no doubt about it," he said. South Africa imports large quantities of explosives for its mining industry, and the explosives were of the type used in mine exploration. The find caused consternation among local school pupils who assumed the explosives would be used to kill people and disrupt the World Cup. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/3505d1096a4e574e7309da072253a1c9 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 734 AP Archive
Anglo-American mine closes 4 shafts and threatens to cut 14,000 jobs
 
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1. Various of disgruntled miners gathering at Khomanani Shaft at Anglo American Platinum mine 2. Wide of mine tower 3. Wide of people gathering 4. Mid of sign reading "Khomanani 1 Shaft" 5. Various of security fencing being worked on 6. Mid of Anglo Platinum train STORYLINE: Disgruntled mine workers began gathering at an Anglo American Platinum mine in Rustenburg on Wednesday, a day after the world's largest platinum producer said it would close some of its operations, sell one mine in South Africa, and cut 14-thousand jobs. The announcement, made on Tuesday, comes just months after South African mining strikes in turned violent, killing dozens of people. Anglo American Platinum said a nearly year-long review found that four mine shafts needed to be closed and one mine sold because of unprofitable operations. The government's minister of mines and the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) expressed surprise and shock at the announcement. Disgruntled workers gathered on Wednesday outside the Khomanani 1 Shaft, one of the shafts due for closure at the mine. Some 46 people were killed during a six-week period of violent strikes at Lonmin's platinum mine last year in Marikana, South Africa, when miners demanded higher wages. In the most shocking incident, police fired into a crowd of striking miners near the Marikana mine on August 16, killing 34 people. The labour unrest spread in South Africa, and Anglo American Platinum, known locally as Amplats, saw a more than eight-week strike that crippled the giant at its operation in Rustenburg, about 100 kilometres (60 miles) northwest of Johannesburg. The company had fired 12-thousand workers and then agreed to reinstate them in October, though the miners did not return to work until November. Amplats on Tuesday said that 13-thousand of the jobs it wants to cut are in the Rustenburg region. Anglo American Platinum said it takes its social responsibilities to its laid-off workforce seriously, and would try to create 14-thousand new jobs focused on housing, infrastructure and small business development. The mining industry is a huge part of the economy in South Africa, which is the world's largest producer of platinum, gold and chromium. Most mine workers who carry out manual labour are black. The South African Institute of Race Relations says that the unemployment rate for black South Africans was nearly 41 percent in 2012, while the corresponding rate for white South Africans was 7.5 percent. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/36843ceabe3a84147e2b647120a6d7d9 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 90 AP Archive
Biggest Gold Mine Opens (1962)
 
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Title reads: "Biggest gold mine opens". South Africa. Various shots Western Deep Levels gold mine. Interior of processing plant. Mine Chairman Harry Oppenheimer addresses guests at opening ceremony. Governor of Reserve Bank Dr. de Koch then speaks and before pressing which starts the ball and tube mills rolling. Mrs. Oppenheimer then presses button to start gold pouring operation. Mrs. Oppenheimer then over touches a gold ingot for luck. Below surface, in mine shaft. M/S train rolling past camera. Various shots black South African miners using pneumatic drills. C/U shift boss measuring the face of gold reef. More shots miners drilling. M/S mechanical scrapper dragging ore to a grid where it drops through. C/U train with a load of ore passing by a grid, the truck tips the ore through the grid. C/U conveyor belt carrying waste rock. Panning shot recovery plant where tube and ball mills are operating. Exterior. L/S double aqua suct which conveys the pulverised ore and water to the settling tanks. L/S mine. Note: newspaper cuttings on file. FILM ID:1715.19 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 621 British Pathé
Mine bosses call the death of eight gold miners a "sad day" for the SAfrican industry
 
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Rescue teams continued the search for a missing miner in South Africa on Thursday, after eight miners were killed in an underground fire triggered by an earthquake. South African Minister of Mineral Resources, Susan Shabangu, visited the Harmony "Shaft 1" mine in Doornkop to speak to crowds of miners as rescue efforts continued below ground. Patrice Motsepe, non-executive Chairman of Harmony Gold, described the incident as "a very said day for the industry" in a news conference in Doornkop. Shabangu, who recently attended an international mining conference (or Indaba) being held in Cape Town, said how unfortunate it was to experience such a tragedy at a time when South Africa is "making sure that we continue to give a positive story to the world when it comes to the mining industry." Smoke and a rockfall had hampered the search for survivors after a fire broke out 1.7 kilometres (one mile) underground at the Doornkop mine at around 6 pm (1600 GMT) on Tuesday, the Harmony Gold company said in a statement. The mine is 30 kilometres (19 miles) west of Johannesburg. On Wednesday morning rescue teams located eight other miners who had sought refuge from the fire and brought all of them to the surface within several hours. On Thursday morning, Harmony announced the discovery of eight bodies. Graham Briggs, CEO of Harmony Gold, said that it would be "dangerous to just jump to a conclusion as to what the cause was" until South Africa's Department of Mineral Resources had finished their investigation. South Africa has some of the deepest mines in the world, raising concern about the safety of workers who could be more vulnerable to tremors and other dangers. The Doornkop mine shaft extends about two kilometres (1.2 miles) below ground. Harmony's deepest gold mines go to twice that depth, according to Harmony spokesman, James Duncan. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2dca9ff41e8958d7ecf3af6b9b10467c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 317 AP Archive
Farm protests continue in South Africa as violence escalates
 
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1. Wide of striking farm workers from De Doorns throwing rocks at police 2. Mid of armoured police vehicle getting hit by rocks 3. Wide of protesters throwing rocks at police, razor wire in foreground 4. Mid of armoured police vehicle pushing burned-out car away 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Nosey Pieterse, General secretary of the Building and Allied Workers Union of South Africa: "They want 150 rand (17.5 US dollars) a day; they want better housing conditions on the farms and they want better working conditions." 6. Wide of street, with police and protesters standing off against each other in front of local grape depot 7. Close of bloodstain on wall (following shooting of local politician) 8. Mid of armed private security guard protecting farm 9. Wide of security guard and dog inside farm 10. Mid of local ANC politician talking with police 11. Local ANC politician talking to police, UPSOUND (Afrikaans) "Everyone came this side and they shot our leader, they shot one of our senior leaders. This is the plan of the farmers and me and Pat are on a hit list." 12. Wide of police shooting rubber bullets at striking farmers as they run through vineyards 13. Wide of street outside township, with protesters and police STORYLINE: Striking farm workers continued violent protests Thursday in South Africa's Western Cape on Thursday, as demonstrators and police clashed with rocks and rubber bullets. The protesters - who came from the town of De Doorns - also tried to set up burning barricades on the main highway. De Doorns is one of many poor towns in South African's Western Cape province whose vineyards are vital to the wine industry. Riot police closed the main highway and retaliated by firing rubber bullets. Labour unrest has been reported in several areas of Western Cape province, where similar protests last year also turned violent, resulting in at least two deaths. The protesters had sought to block roads in a campaign for higher wages and to prevent other farmhands from going to work. They want their daily wages to be more than doubled to 150 South African rand (17.5 US dollars). According to Nosey Pieterse, general secretary of the Building and Allied Workers Union of South Africa, the strikers also "want better housing conditions on the farms and they want better working conditions." Earlier in the day, a local politician was reportedly shot at by private security guards that had been hired to protect the farms. Blood could be seen splattered on one of the farm walls. Protesters fear the police will not be able to protect them from the private security guards should they open fire. One local politician was arguing with police officers, telling them that "they shot our leader, they shot one of our senior leaders". "This is the plan of the farmers and me and Pat are on a hit list," he added. South Africa is a major wine producer. In addition to grape-harvesting, workers involved in the protests work on apple and other fruit farms. The country's mining industry was also shaken by labour unrest last year. Some of those protests turned violent, culminating in the shooting deaths of several dozen miners by police at a platinum mine. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6bf6afe2bd7424004c04041fd60964f5 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 341 AP Archive
Gold Mining Methods  (1961)
 
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Welkom, South Africa (Reel 2) MS CU Group of African miners walking along tunnel towards camera. MS White miner taking fuse from box. MCU Miner setting fuses and charges. MS Group of African dancers. Various CU's. African miner drilling gold face with electric drill which he is operating with his feet. CU Man pointing out seam in the gold face. CU Man lighting fuse. (Orig. Neg.) (For Reel 1 see 3467 A) GV. Town of Welkom (5 shots). GV. Nissen hut where an African family lives. GV. Row of huts in the African workers quarter. (Huts are globe shaped) Various shots of mining process. African dancers. Shots in mine with man lighting match. (Orig. Neg.) (Reel 1 see 3467 A) FILM ID:2683.05 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 413 British Pathé
Gold Rush In South Africa (1920-1929)
 
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Gold Rush in South Africa. Shot of men running across a field, the field is packed. Pan on rocky terrain, pan to more of men running, alongside a few cattle running. Closer shot of men staking their claims by putting stakes in the ground. A few men stand around talking. American cataloguer's note: gold was originally discovered in SA in 1886, this must be a new area found in the 1920s. FILM ID:2446.15 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 2107 British Pathé
Miners march near troubled Marikana platinum mine, ignoring call to return to work
 
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(10 Sep 2012) Hundreds of miners marched near South Africa's troubled Marikana platinum mine on Monday, ignoring a call by unions to return to work. Holding traditional spears and placards, with many wearing distinctive union T-shirts, the men protested in demand for a pay raise. They marched under the close eye of armed police wearing riot gear, some in armoured cars, others on foot. Just over six percent of Marikana's 28-thousand workers turned up for their Monday shift at the mine west of Johannesburg. Mine owners Lonmin had hoped that many miners would come to work since a peace accord was signed last week with three major unions. But it was rejected by a breakaway union, and now strikers who say they do not want to be represented by any union. The South African government brokered the peace deal after police shot and killed 34 miners and wounded 78 last month. The attack was reminiscent of apartheid-era days that has traumatised the nation of 48 (m) million. Strikers have threatened to kill any miners or managers who do not respect their demand for all work to stop until Lonmin agrees to a take-home pay of 12,500 rand (1,560 US dollars) - about double their current wages. Union rivalry is at the root of the violent illegal strikes that have been troubling the mining industry, the engine driving Africa's largest economy. The breakaway Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU) has this year poached thousands of workers from the National Union of Mineworkers, South Africa's largest and politically connected workers' representative. AMCU president Joseph Mathunjwa told the Associated Press that he will be attending wage negotiations set to start on Monday at the Lonmin mine. But he said his continuing participation depends on his union not being sidelined to observer status. Also on Monday, labour unrest had spread to other mines in South Africa. A wildcat strike by 15-thousand gold miners hit a mine in the West Rand, while few workers reported for work at the world's third largest platinum mine in the East Rand. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f5a5ec5bf1b2049b1e67eacb1bb54f69 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 290 AP Archive
Mining equipment for hire south africa
 
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Mining unions call for President Zuma's help to end ongoing strikes
 
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(13 Sep 2012) Negotiations restarted on Thursday after several weeks of workers' strikes that have brought South Africa's north-west mining belt to a partial standstill. At a site near the Lonmin platinum mine in Marikana where 34 miners were gunned down by police on 16 August, mine workers, bosses and unions sat down to finally try and hammer out an agreement to the deadlock. Earlier on Thursday, leaders from the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU) called on South African President Jacob Zuma to preside over a meeting of the country's mining industry. "As AMCU we make a clarion call to the President of the Republic of South Africa, his Excellency Jacob Zuma, to call a mining indaba (gathering) on the state of the mining industry of South Africa," said AMCU president Joseph Mathunjwa. Meanwhile, miners from the Anglo American platinum mine in Rustenburg, northwest South Africa, joined forces with their colleagues from Marikana on Thursday in a show of solidarity against low wages. The coming together of miners from the two mining giants is an attempt to bring to a halt all mining in the Rustenburg area. By early on Thursday morning, several thousand miners had arrived at the Blesbok stadium in Rustenburg. Carrying makeshift placards and wielding sticks, the miners sang and danced. "We have children that we have to maintain, we have families. So those people must think for us, they mustn't think for themselves, they earn much from us," said Sami Tutuvala, a miner at Anglo American's platinum mine in Rustenburg. "This land is South Africa and South Africans are the ones who are producing here," Tutuvala said. The miners are demanding a wage of 12,500 rand (1,560 US dollars). The plight of miners living in tin shacks while they produce the raw materials for luxury goods under dangerous conditions has put a spotlight on the South African government's failure to meet basic needs like clean water and decent health care. It has also drawn attention to the widening gap between a small black elite that lives sumptuously while many South Africans worry where their next meal will come from. The government brokered the peace deal after police shot and killed 34 miners and wounded 78 on 16 December at Marikana, a mass shooting reminiscent of apartheid-era days that has traumatised the nation of 48 (m) million. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/38d1a1ee175dd07c0a19f1d94aadbc8e Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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