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Lecture - 34 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery
 
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Lecture Series on Database Management System by Dr. S. Srinath,IIIT Bangalore. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 135269 nptelhrd
What is CONCEPT MINING? What does CONCEPT MINING mean? CONCEPT MINING meaning & explanation
 
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What is CONCEPT MINING? What does CONCEPT MINING mean? CONCEPT MINING meaning - CONCEPT MINING definition - CONCEPT MINING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Concept mining is an activity that results in the extraction of concepts from artifacts. Solutions to the task typically involve aspects of artificial intelligence and statistics, such as data mining and text mining. Because artifacts are typically a loosely structured sequence of words and other symbols (rather than concepts), the problem is nontrivial, but it can provide powerful insights into the meaning, provenance and similarity of documents. Traditionally, the conversion of words to concepts has been performed using a thesaurus, and for computational techniques the tendency is to do the same. The thesauri used are either specially created for the task, or a pre-existing language model, usually related to Princeton's WordNet. The mappings of words to concepts are often ambiguous. Typically each word in a given language will relate to several possible concepts. Humans use context to disambiguate the various meanings of a given piece of text, where available machine translation systems cannot easily infer context. For the purposes of concept mining however, these ambiguities tend to be less important than they are with machine translation, for in large documents the ambiguities tend to even out, much as is the case with text mining. There are many techniques for disambiguation that may be used. Examples are linguistic analysis of the text and the use of word and concept association frequency information that may be inferred from large text corpora. Recently, techniques that base on semantic similarity between the possible concepts and the context have appeared and gained interest in the scientific community. One of the spin-offs of calculating document statistics in the concept domain, rather than the word domain, is that concepts form natural tree structures based on hypernymy and meronymy. These structures can be used to produce simple tree membership statistics, that can be used to locate any document in a Euclidean concept space. If the size of a document is also considered as another dimension of this space then an extremely efficient indexing system can be created. This technique is currently in commercial use locating similar legal documents in a 2.5 million document corpus. Standard numeric clustering techniques may be used in "concept space" as described above to locate and index documents by the inferred topic. These are numerically far more efficient than their text mining cousins, and tend to behave more intuitively, in that they map better to the similarity measures a human would generate.
Views: 515 The Audiopedia
Content Mining of the bioscience literature
 
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Published on May 14, 2015 by BioCADDIE Project https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9LePsd9R9A Abstract: The ContentMine (http://contentmine.org/) has developed Open tools for mining the scientific and medical literature (full text, figures, images and supplemental data). We have developed a pipeline to cover the whole process of Crawling, Scraping, Normalising and Mining articles and storing/republishing the results. We are now doing this on a daily basis. The ContentMine is funded by a Fellowship to PMR from the Shuttleworth Foundation. The aims include the creation of subcommunities, and unrestricted dissemination of all materials, code and results (Apache 2, CC-BY and CC0 as appropriate). We intend to generate publish 100 million facts per year available for use and re-use. The system is designed to allow anyone to create pluggable resources (code, vocabularies) and to make ContentMining easy and available to anyone. Much of our work is through interactive workshops and we hope to show participants how to start ContentMining. Two of our approaches include downloadable virtual machines and a web service. Bio: Dr. Peter Murray-Rust is a chemist currently working at the University of Cambridge. As well as his work in chemistry, Dr. Murray-Rust is also known for his support of open access and open data. He leads the team at the ContentMine project which uses machines to liberate 100,000,000 facts from the scientific literature. After obtaining a Ph.D., he became lecturer in chemistry at the (new) University of Stirling and was first warden of Andrew Stewart Hall of Residence. In 1982 he moved to Glaxo Group Research at Greenford to head Molecular Graphics, Computational Chemistry and later protein structure determination. He was Professor of Pharmacy in the University of Nottingham from 1996-2000, setting up the Virtual School of Molecular Sciences. He is now Reader in Molecular Informatics at the University of Cambridge and Senior Research Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge. Dr. Murray-Rust's research interests have involved the automated analysis of data in scientific publications, creation of virtual communities (e.g., The Virtual School of Natural Sciences in the Globewide Network Academy and the Semantic Web). With Henry Rzepa he has extended this to chemistry through the development of markup languages, especially Chemical Markup Language. He campaigns for open data, particularly in science, and is on the advisory board of the Open Knowledge Foundation and a co-author of the Panton Principles for Open scientific data. Together with a few other chemists he was a founder member of the Blue Obelisk movement in 2005.
Views: 249 ContentMine
What is TERMINOLOGY EXTRACTION? What does TERMINOLOGY EXTRACTION mean?
 
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What is TERMINOLOGY EXTRACTION? What does TERMINOLOGY EXTRACTION mean? TERMINOLOGY EXTRACTION meaning - TERMINOLOGY EXTRACTION definition - TERMINOLOGY EXTRACTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Terminology extraction (also known as term extraction, glossary extraction, term recognition, or terminology mining) is a subtask of information extraction. The goal of terminology extraction is to automatically extract relevant terms from a given corpus. In the semantic web era, a growing number of communities and networked enterprises started to access and interoperate through the internet. Modeling these communities and their information needs is important for several web applications, like topic-driven web crawlers, web services, recommender systems, etc. The development of terminology extraction is essential to the language industry. One of the first steps to model the knowledge domain of a virtual community is to collect a vocabulary of domain-relevant terms, constituting the linguistic surface manifestation of domain concepts. Several methods to automatically extract technical terms from domain-specific document warehouses have been described in the literature. Typically, approaches to automatic term extraction make use of linguistic processors (part of speech tagging, phrase chunking) to extract terminological candidates, i.e. syntactically plausible terminological noun phrases, NPs (e.g. compounds "credit card", adjective-NPs "local tourist information office", and prepositional-NPs "board of directors" - in English, the first two constructs are the most frequent). Terminological entries are then filtered from the candidate list using statistical and machine learning methods. Once filtered, because of their low ambiguity and high specificity, these terms are particularly useful for conceptualizing a knowledge domain or for supporting the creation of a domain ontology or a terminology base. Furthermore, terminology extraction is a very useful starting point for semantic similarity, knowledge management, human translation and machine translation, etc. The methods for terminology extraction can be applied to parallel corpora. Combined with e.g. co-occurrence statistics, candidates for term translations can be obtained. Bilingual terminology can be extracted also from comparable corpora (corpora containing texts within the same text type, domain but not translations of documents between each other).
Views: 731 The Audiopedia
Wenco Webinar Series - Unlocking Hidden Value in Mine Operations Data
 
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Join Wenco subject matter experts Simran Walia, Eric Winsborrow, and Jason Clarke, and Murray O'Keefe of Maules Creek mine, as they discuss Unlocking Hidden Value in Mine Operations Data.
Views: 383 Wencomine
Mining the Crowd - Tova Milo - Technion Computer Engineering lecture
 
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Mining the Crowd Lecture by Prof. Tova Milo, Head of the Computer Science Department, Tel Aviv University Harnessing a crowd of Web users for data collection has recently become a wide-spread phenomenon. A key challenge is that the human knowledge forms an open world and it is thus difficult to know what kind of information we should be looking for. Classic databases have addressed this problem by data mining techniques that identify interesting data patterns. These techniques, however, are not suitable for the crowd. This is mainly due to properties of the human memory, such as the tendency to remember simple trends and summaries rather than exact details. Following these observations, we develop here a novel model for crowd mining. We will consider in the talk the logical, algorithmic, and methodological foundations needed for such a mining process, as well as the applications that can benefit from the knowledge mined from crowd.
Views: 840 Technion
Mining Anomalies in Network-Wide Flow Data
 
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Speakers: Mark Crovella, Boston University. Christophe Diot, Thomson Paris Research. Anukool Lakhina, Boston University Network operators are routinely confronted with a wide range of anomalies—ranging from abuse-related events (DOS attacks, worms, scans) to maintenance issues (outages, misconfigurations, etc.) to unusual customer behavior (flash crowds, shift in customer demands, etc.). To mitigate their effect, operators need to mine network-wide data for anomalies as they occur, and once detected, classify them in order to select the appropriate response. In this talk, we will present techniques to detect and classify anomalies in network-wide flow traffic data. We will then apply our methods on data collected from two backbone networks, and show that they can: 1) detect a broad set of anomalies, at a low false alarm rate, and 2) automatically classify anomalies into meaningful categories. See more at: https://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog35/agenda
Views: 53 TeamNANOG
Symposium on Blockchain for Robotic Systems
 
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Robotic systems are revolutionizing applications from transportation to health care. However, many of the characteristics that make robots ideal for future applications—such as autonomy, self-learning, and knowledge sharing—also raise concerns about the evolution of the technology. Blockchain, an emerging technology that originated in the digital currency field, shows great potential to make robotic operations more secure, autonomous, flexible, and even profitable, thereby bridging the gap between purely scientific domains and real-world applications. This symposium seeks to move beyond the classical view of robotic systems to advance our understanding about the possibilities and limitations of combining state-of-the art robotic systems with blockchain technology. More information at: https://www.media.mit.edu/events/symposium-on-blockchain-for-robotics/ License: CC-BY-4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
Views: 2572 MIT Media Lab
Outline of formal science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outline_of_science 00:01:04 1 Essence of science 00:02:18 2 Scientific method 00:07:04 3 Branches of science 00:07:28 3.1 Natural science 00:08:35 3.2 Formal science 00:55:27 3.3 Social science 00:56:37 3.4 Applied science 00:57:07 4 How scientific fields differ 00:58:13 5 Politics of science 00:59:33 6 History of science 01:01:46 6.1 By period 01:04:08 6.1.1 By date 01:05:03 6.2 By field 01:08:58 6.3 By region 01:09:07 6.3.1 History of science in present states, by continent 01:09:25 6.3.2 History of science in historic states 01:09:59 7 Philosophy of science 01:10:20 8 Scientific community 01:10:47 8.1 Scientific organizations 01:11:07 8.2 Scientists 01:11:50 8.2.1 Types of scientist 01:11:59 8.2.1.1 By field 01:28:07 8.2.1.2 By employment status 01:28:56 8.2.2 Famous scientists 01:33:12 9 Science education 01:33:59 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7254187033487707 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The following outline is provided as a topical overview of science: Science – the systematic effort of acquiring knowledge—through observation and experimentation coupled with logic and reasoning to find out what can be proved or not proved—and the knowledge thus acquired. The word "science" comes from the Latin word "scientia" meaning knowledge. A practitioner of science is called a "scientist". Modern science respects objective logical reasoning, and follows a set of core procedures or rules in order to determine the nature and underlying natural laws of the universe and everything in it. Some scientists do not know of the rules themselves, but follow them through research policies. These procedures are known as the scientific method.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Big Data, Big Copyright
 
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Event held: October 6, 2014 This talk covers recent and ongoing litigation involving new bulk uses of copyrighted work, and offers some thoughts about the coming age of Big Copyright. Presenter James Grimmelmann is Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law and a Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. He studies how laws regulating software affect freedom, wealth, and power. As a lawyer and technologist, he helps these two groups understand each other by writing about copyright, search engines, privacy, and other topics in computer and Internet law.
Views: 135 AU Library
Peter Coffee Webinar
 
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Views: 16 ICTDM Sector
MinervaRoundUp2019Smyth
 
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Minerva Intelligence Inc. Innovation Hub presentation at AMEBC's RoundUp Conference, 2019, by Clinton Smyth, CEO.
Views: 51 GeoreferenceOnline
Eric Schmidt at TechCrunch Disrupt
 
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Eric Schmidt speaks at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco, Calif., on September 28, 2010. http://disrupt.techcrunch.com/2010-sf/
Views: 21258 Google
Outline of science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outline_of_science 00:00:47 1 Essence of science 00:01:43 2 Scientific method 00:05:13 3 Branches of science 00:05:32 3.1 Natural science 00:06:22 3.2 Formal science 00:40:51 3.3 Social science 00:41:44 3.4 Applied science 00:42:08 4 How scientific fields differ 00:42:58 5 Politics of science 00:43:59 6 History of science 00:45:37 6.1 By period 00:47:24 6.1.1 By date 00:48:06 6.2 By field 00:50:59 6.3 By region 00:51:07 6.3.1 History of science in present states, by continent 00:51:22 6.3.2 History of science in historic states 00:51:48 7 Philosophy of science 00:52:05 8 Scientific community 00:52:27 8.1 Scientific organizations 00:52:44 8.2 Scientists 00:53:17 8.2.1 Types of scientist 00:53:25 8.2.1.1 By field 01:05:11 8.2.1.2 By employment status 01:05:48 8.2.2 Famous scientists 01:08:58 9 Science education 01:09:34 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The following outline is provided as a topical overview of science: Science – the systematic effort of acquiring knowledge—through observation and experimentation coupled with logic and reasoning to find out what can be proved or not proved—and the knowledge thus acquired. The word "science" comes from the Latin word "scientia" meaning knowledge. A practitioner of science is called a "scientist". Modern science respects objective logical reasoning, and follows a set of core procedures or rules in order to determine the nature and underlying natural laws of the universe and everything in it. Some scientists do not know of the rules themselves, but follow them through research policies. These procedures are known as the scientific method.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 211341 Shari Wing
2012 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_in_science 00:00:55 1 Events, discoveries and inventions 00:01:05 1.1 January 00:18:16 1.2 February 00:28:03 1.3 March 00:37:02 1.4 April 00:49:40 1.5 May 00:59:22 1.6 June 01:13:48 1.7 July 01:24:00 1.8 August 01:38:40 1.9 September 01:54:11 1.10 October 02:10:00 1.11 November 02:31:53 1.12 December 02:44:40 2 IISE iTop 10 New Species/i 02:45:07 3 Prizes 02:45:16 3.1 Abel Prize 02:45:28 3.2 Fundamental Physics Prize 02:46:03 3.3 Kyoto Prize 02:46:22 3.4 Nobel Prize 02:46:50 4 Deaths 02:47:03 4.1 January 02:47:42 4.2 February 02:48:18 4.3 March 02:48:44 4.4 April 02:49:20 4.5 May 02:50:19 4.6 June 02:50:56 4.7 July 02:51:50 4.8 August 02:52:48 4.9 September 02:53:41 4.10 October 02:54:48 4.11 November 02:55:33 4.12 December 02:56:45 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8430525643429431 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 2012 involved many significant scientific events and discoveries, including the first orbital rendezvous by a commercial spacecraft, the discovery of a particle highly similar to the long-sought Higgs boson, and the near-eradication of guinea worm disease. A total of 72 successful orbital spaceflights occurred in 2012, and the year also saw numerous developments in fields such as robotics, 3D printing, stem cell research and genetics. Over 540,000 technological patent applications were made in the United States alone in 2012.2012 was declared the International Year of Sustainable Energy for All by the United Nations. 2012 also marked Alan Turing Year, a celebration of the life and work of the English mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and computer scientist Alan Turing.
Views: 85 wikipedia tts
List of sciences | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outline_of_science 00:00:57 1 Essence of science 00:02:03 2 Scientific method 00:06:28 3 Branches of science 00:06:50 3.1 Natural science 00:07:53 3.2 Formal science 00:50:01 3.3 Social science 00:51:07 3.4 Applied science 00:51:35 4 How scientific fields differ 00:52:36 5 Politics of science 00:53:51 6 History of science 00:55:51 6.1 By period 00:58:02 6.1.1 By date 00:58:51 6.2 By field 01:02:25 6.3 By region 01:02:34 6.3.1 History of science in present states, by continent 01:02:50 6.3.2 History of science in historic states 01:03:20 7 Philosophy of science 01:03:39 8 Scientific community 01:04:05 8.1 Scientific organizations 01:04:23 8.2 Scientists 01:05:02 8.2.1 Types of scientist 01:05:11 8.2.1.1 By field 01:19:28 8.2.1.2 By employment status 01:20:14 8.2.2 Famous scientists 01:24:07 9 Science education 01:24:49 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8170095656723508 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The following outline is provided as a topical overview of science: Science – the systematic effort of acquiring knowledge—through observation and experimentation coupled with logic and reasoning to find out what can be proved or not proved—and the knowledge thus acquired. The word "science" comes from the Latin word "scientia" meaning knowledge. A practitioner of science is called a "scientist". Modern science respects objective logical reasoning, and follows a set of core procedures or rules in order to determine the nature and underlying natural laws of the universe and everything in it. Some scientists do not know of the rules themselves, but follow them through research policies. These procedures are known as the scientific method.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts