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New California Rare Earth Facility Ramping Up Production
 
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After more than three years of design, engineering, construction, and commissioning, Molycorp's new, state-of-the-art rare earth processing facility at Mountain Pass, California is fully operational and is now ramping up production of rare earth materials for customers around the globe. This complex is one of the world's most technologically advanced, energy efficient and environmentally progressive rare earth facilities. It sets a new standard for the production of rare earths with less impact on the environment.
Views: 25222 Molycorp Inc
Precious minerals at Mountain Pass Mine
 
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Precious minerals at Mountain Pass Mine
Views: 1268 The Press-Enterprise
China's hold on rare earths
 
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As China stockpiles rare earth minerals used to manufacture consumer items like iPhones and cameras, the U.S. is facing a growing shortage.
Views: 2551 CNN Business
National Security, Rare Earth Elements & The Thorium Problem
 
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"The only operating rare earth mine in the United States sends all of their valuable resources to China for processing. Congress does not know this. They think this [mining] company is supplying the U.S. value chain, [and] is supplying the military. It is in-fact, the opposite. They are part of the Chinese monopoly. They're taking powder and shipping it to China, and it comes back as a magnet, or an alloy, or a bolt-on component." - Jim Kennedy To address this issue, contact your legislators to support H.R.4883 https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr4883 Why can't Molycorp, Lynas or any other 'western' rare earth company succeed? China's production and market advantage in Rare Earth Elements (REE) is largely the result of NRC and IAEA "Source Material" regulations with unintended consequences. Source Material: Materials containing any ratio or combination of Thorium and Uranium above .05%. Producing or holding these materials within the regulatory threshold (.05%) requires extensive and wide-ranging licensing, storage, transportation, remediation disposal and compliance costs, including prohibitive liability and bonding issues. Consequently any potential supplier of byproduct / co-product rare earth resources that would be designated as "source material' disposes of these valuable resources to avoid liability and compliance issues. NRC / IAEA regulations regarding "Source Material" played a key roll in undermining the economic viability of all 'western' rare earth producers and are a critical factor in China's current 'market advantage'. Producers like Molycorp and Lynas, with low Thorium deposits, can never compete with China. Resources are abundant and available: U.S mining companies currently mine as much as 50% of global Rare Earth Elements demand every year. But these resources are diverted in tailings lakes or are redistributed back into the host ore body, due to NRC and IAEA regulations defining Monazite and other Thorium bearing rare earth resources as "Source Material". H.R. 4883 would solve the "Thorium Problem" by creating a federally chartered multinational Thorium Energy and Industrial Products Corporation ("Thorium Bank"). Privately funded and operated, this would decouple thorium from rare earth production. The Thorium Corporation would also have Congressional Authority to develop Thorium energy systems and industrial products. Environmental regulations are not scaled back... rather this enables thorium to be stored safely & securely, rather then being treated as "waste". https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr4883 H.R. 4883 thus also addresses the U.S. Weapons Systems current 100% Dependency on China for Rare Earths. http://thoriumenergyalliance.com/downloads/TEAC6/USWeaponsChinese.pdf Federal Legislation governing Strategic Materials, 10 USC 2533b, does not specify rare earths, but includes metal alloys containing limited amounts of manganese, silicon, copper, or aluminum, chromium, cobalt, columbium, molybdenum, nickel, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, nickel and iron-nickel, cobalt, Titanium and Zirconium alloys. Federal Regulations require that these materials be melted in the U.S. Most of these materials are utilized in rare earth alloys, magnets and components in the defense industry. The bill does NOT reclassify thorium. It does NOT alter current environmental protection. It simply resolves "The Thorium Problem" which cripples United States domestic rare earth mining, processing and value-adding processes. Source Footage: Jim Kennedy @ IAEA: http://youtu.be/fLR39sT_bTs Jim Kennedy interview @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/Dih30mUexrA Jim Kennedy Talk @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/CARlEac1iuA Stephen Boyd @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/z7qfOnMzP9Y Stephen Boyd @ TEAC4: http://youtu.be/J16IpITWBQ8 John Kutsch @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/MgRn4g7a068
Views: 44598 gordonmcdowell
PRIMELOX LANDAMERICA LLC / MOLYCORP RARE EARTH MINE / MEXICO - MT PASS CA / TX 2.mpg
 
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HEAVY HAUL / SUPERLOAD HAULAGE FOR MOLYCORP RARE EARTH MINE / MEXICO -CALIFORNIA / TX TRAVEL 2
Views: 387 PRIMELOX1
Gold rush mines a solution for rare earth metals?  Think again...
 
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During America's Gold rush era, miners searched for gold, silver and copper deposits. But what was too early to know back then, is that what they considered to be worthless and tossed aside in the piles of dirt would one day be valuable for modern technology. Yet, in what quantity? Not enough to fuel an industrial boom of any type in the West. Like it or not, 97% of the world's rare earth materials are in China. Meaning that going forward in this high tech world, China will be a major player regardless of politics, economy or metals prices. Remember, most military gear today requires these materials and you cannot build a high tech military without rare elements. http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2013-07-21/gold-rush-era-discards-could-fuel-cellphones-tvs http://dailygadgetry.com/rare-elements-to-fuel-cellphonestossed-aside-during-gold-rush/1313 http://www.salon.com/2013/07/21/gold_rush_era_discards_could_fuel_cellphones_tvs/singleton/ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/9951299/Japan-breaks-Chinas-stranglehold-on-rare-metals-with-sea-mud-bonanza.html http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/at-the-edge/2013/04/02/chinas-continuing-monopoly-over-rare-earth-minerals http://www.theverge.com/2013/7/21/4542872/gold-rush-mines-could-be-rich-in-rare-earth-metals
Views: 922 clearasvodka
Weslosky interviews Lifton on the rare earth processing and magnetic material advantage
 
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August 6, 2014 -- Molycorp (NYSE: MCP) announced at market close today their financial and operating results for the second quarter 2014. As such, I have decided to push out the discussion I had with Jack Lifton, Founding Principal of Technology Metals Research (TMR), LLC yesterday morning for publication this evening. In our conversation we discuss his recent business trip to France, the mandatory processing plan-of-action required for a junior rare earth company to advance towards production; and the competitive advantage of rare earth companies that have magnet materials. Jack who has just returned from almost 2 weeks in France, starts by answering the question I really wanted to know, which was -- what was he really doing there? Jack describes broadly the mission to tour two different companies that specialize in processing critical materials. His recent article Processing, not just Production, is the Key to Survival for a Rare Earth Junior was the 2nd most viewed article on InvestorIntel last week, so I asked him to provide his leaders’ list. This said, I will make you watch the video versus providing the normal shortcut in listing this for you for you to appreciate the subtleties in his position. Additionally, Jack and I discuss bill HR 4883 and the efforts towards getting the U.S. government to build a central rare earth processing station. There were numerous topics discussed, but Jack’s commentary on the lack of collegiality in the sector, and his redirection on why North America and Europe should be seeking their own source of rare earths is a compelling one – worth listening to. His comment about the industry events being more like “I spy, then networking events” included a challenge for me to host another event. Disclaimer: Everyone who writes and posts on InvestorIntel disclose their clients in the biography sections underneath their posts. Mine may be accessed at http://investorintel.com/author/tracy-weslosky/ and Jack Lifton’s may be accessed at http://investorintel.com/author/jack-lifton/
Views: 522 InvestorIntel
US Resumes All-Important Rare Earth Mining to Offset Chinese
 
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A major U.S. mine for rare earth metals has gone back into operation, adding a much needed source to offset China's control of the unique group of materials necessary to build tech gadgets like smart phones and laptops. Check out the full story here: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/214938/us_rare_earth_mine_resumes_active_mining.html
General Ludd - Molycorp Mountain Pass
 
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Rare Earth Metal EP - TTY016 Enjoy! DISCLAIMER: All music via the funked ifeyeknow YouTube page is for promotional reasons only. All rights reserved to the artists featured and all credit goes to the rightful owners. -uploaded in HD at http://www.TunesToTube.com -uploaded in HD at http://www.TunesToTube.com -uploaded in HD at http://www.TunesToTube.com
Views: 2578 funked ifeyeknow
MORE PRECIOUS THAN GOLD? - China's Rare Earth Minerals Consolidation
 
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The cost of many rare earth elements has defied analysts' predictions with steep price increases since the beginning of the month. For instance in the last week, the price of dysprosium has risen from around $700 per kilogram up to $1,470. Bloomberg's Jason Scott also reported on June 16th that the price of europium "has risen to as much as $3,400 a kilogram from between $1,260 and $1,300 [per kilogram]." Numerous changes to Chinese mining and trade policies are being attributed to price rise. The changes revolve around the consolidation of rare earth producers in China. Chinese officials have stated their plans to consolidate the industry in an attempt reduce pollution, as well as illegal smuggling of the metals attributed to small artisanal mining firms.
Views: 6690 zombiehellmonkey
Rare Earth Elements Stocks - Pele Mountain Company - Stock Symbol GEM: TSX-V
 
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Pele Mountain Resources is focused on the sustainable development of its Eco Ridge Mine Uranium and Rare Earth Elements ("REE") project, located in the Elliot Lake mining camp of Northern Ontario. Pele's expert team of technical personnel, advisors, and consultants is working to optimize mining, processing, and waste management techniques at Eco Ridge. With well-understood geology, excellent regional infrastructure, and strong local support, Eco Ridge provides an ideal location for a safe, secure, and reliable long-term supply of Uranium and REE. Additionally, Pele has, or is actively seeking, qualified strategic partners to advance its other high-potential exploration projects, including high-grade gold properties at Highland and Ardeen. Pele's shares are listed on the TSX Venture Exchange under the symbol "GEM".
Views: 6565 Moneyinmetal
Researchers Refine Rare Earth Element Recovery Process
 
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Researchers at WVU are working to refine the process of recovering valuable rare earth elements from acid mine drainage sludge. The sludge is a byproduct of the water treatment process and was a waste product with no value, until now.
Views: 210 Environment Matters
Rare Earth Mining
 
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VOA's Philip Alexiou talks with the President and CEO of Avalon Rare Metals who recently visited the New York Stock Exchange. Don Bubar who leads the Toronto based company talks about the kinds of rare earth metals Avalon will focus on and how China's rare earth supply policy is affecting the metals and minerals market.
Views: 12428 VOA News
Molycorp: Financing the Production of Rare Earth Minerals (A) Case Solutions
 
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http://www.thecasesolutions.com/ This case is about MOLYCORP: FINANCING THE PRODUCTION OF RARE EARTH MINERALS (A) Get your MOLYCORP: FINANCING THE PRODUCTION OF RARE EARTH MINERALS (A) Case Solution at TheCaseSolutions.com TheCaseSolutions.com is the number 1 destination for getting the case studies analyzed. http://www.thecasesolutions.com/molycorp-financing-the-production-of-rare-earth-minerals-a-2-33701
US Mining Companies Show New Interest in Rare Earths
 
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I'm Mario Ritter with the VOA Special English Economics Report, from http://voaspecialenglish.com | http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish Today we continue our report on the group of chemical elements known as rare earth metals. These are mined from the earth and used to make technology from mobile phones to missiles. The United States once led the world in rare earths. Today China controls almost all production. Premier Wen Jiabao says China will not use these metals as a diplomatic weapon. But Japan says exports meant for that country have remained at Chinese ports as a result of a recent dispute. The United States stopped mining rare earths in two thousand two. Companies blamed environmental rules and low-priced imports from China. But now exploration is moving forward again. Edward Cowle is president and chief executive of a company called U.S. Rare Earths. He and his partners gained rights to some land in the American West about fifteen years ago. They had been interested in thorium -- a radioactive element that can fuel nuclear reactors but not be processed into weapons. Mr. Cowle later found that the land also held a lot of rare earth metals -- lately a subject of intense interest. The company has not started mining yet. It still has to get permits and work with other businesses to put operations in place. Ed Cowle says a lot of work remains. He says the earliest that they could open the mine would be in six to seven years. Another American company is Molycorp. Jim Sims, the public affairs director, says Molycorp has already begun producing three thousand tons of rare earths a year. That makes the United States the world's second largest producer, a distant second. Mr. Sims says Molycorp is the western hemisphere's only producer of rare earth products. The company says the largest reserves of rare earths outside of China are in its mine in Mountain Pass, California, and in the Mount Weld area of Australia. Jim Sims says Molycorp spends only about ten percent on mining. The big cost is in chemically separating the rare earths from the minerals that carry them. He says Molycorp raised about three hundred eighty million dollars when it sold stock to the public for the first time in July. The company aims to increase production to twenty thousand tons by two thousand twelve. It says that would more than meet current levels of demand in the United States. For VOA Special English, I'm Mario Ritter. (Adapted from a radio program broadcast 15Oct2010)
Views: 35673 VOA Learning English
Molycorp: Why It's Extremely Undervalued & Best of Breed in Rare Earth Miners
 
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Please visit my blog at http://www.jasonburack.com to learn more and checkout the Wall St for Main St Facebook fanpage where you can learn and join in on the conversation! Also, please checkout Mo Dawoud's blog, the Mo Money Blog, at http://www.momoneyblog.com http://www.molycorp.com/ http://www.techmetalsresearch.com/ http://www.australianrareearths.com/ http://www.rareearthmarketnews.com/ http://www.raremetalblog.com/ http://rareearthinvestingnews.com/ http://www.financialsensenewshour.com/broadcast/fsn2010-0807-2.mp3
Views: 3107 WallStForMainSt
Rare Earth California Mine Sold to Chinese Competitors
 
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ANOTHER US COMPANY SOLD TO CHINA: What does this mean for the future of America?
Views: 113 ProsperousAmerica
PRIMELOX LANDAMERICA LLC / MOLYCORP RARE EARTH MINE / MEXICO - MT PASS CA / MEXICO 1.mpg
 
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Views: 216 PRIMELOX1
PRIMELOX LANDAMERICA LLC / MOLYCORP - RARE EARTH MINE / MEXICO - MT PASS CA. / NM - AZ.mpg
 
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Views: 247 PRIMELOX1
Peak Resources CEO on the economics of its rare earths project in Tanzania
 
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March 23, 2018 – “But Tanzania is getting ready to start working the backlog of mining licenses and we get that from the mining minister, the deputy mining minister and the commissioner of mining” – said Rocky Smith, CEO of Peak Resources Ltd. (ASX: PEK), in an interview with InvestorIntel’s Peter Clausi.  Peter Clausi: The rare earths are an interesting market right now given the electric vehicle movement. Which rare earths does Peak Resources mine? Rocky Smith: We mine all of the rare earths, but the primary rare earths in our operation are going to be NdPr - neodymium-praseodymium. They represent about 23% of our total rare earth composition. Peter Clausi: What are the other ones? Rocky Smith: Like most rare earth operations, you get about everything, everything comes. There is 15 rare earth elements. The primaries are always cerium and lanthanum, but you always get all of them. In our case the mids and heavies only represent about 1% of the total so they are really not worth that much to talk about. Peter Clausi: Cerium is not really a rare earth. It is a rare earth, but it is not that rare. It is about as plentiful as copper. Rocky Smith: Yes. Well, rare earths are really not that rare in the crust of the earth, but harder to find them in concentrations that you can actually recover them from. Peter Clausi: The economics of mining. You have two projects underway right now. Rocky Smith: We have an operation in Tanzania where the resource is. We are looking at starting that up and putting in a concentrator in Tanzania. Then taking the concentrate and moving it to Teesside in the U.K. and putting a refinery in there. We will basically crack the concentrate and then separate the impurities and then separate the rare earths from each other.   Peter Clausi: To my ear it sounds expensive to ship concentrate that far away. Why would you not just build on site? Rocky Smith: The cost of shipping the reagents to the site would be about five times the cost to ship the concentrate to the reagents. So in this case the availability of a (inaudible) production and we actually do it as a by-product acid source. That is not available in Tanzania. If you were to try to process everything in Tanzania then you would have to ship five tons of reagents to Tanzania for every ton of concentrate that you would have shipped to the U.K. if you would have done it in the other direction. Peter Clausi: Yeah, that is not very economic. Speaking of economic, you put out a project update in October of 2017 with some very impressive numbers. I saw pre-tax NPV of $914 million U.S. dollars. Rocky Smith: Yes. When we got done with the bankable we started really taking a hard look at the numbers and we noticed that we had some high reagent costs, particularly in the floatation areas in Tanzania. We went back and screened that particular area more diligently. We found that there were some opportunities there. We looked at different reagents that were less expensive, which was good, but we also found that the reagents that we were using actually performed so much better than the one that we had in our BFS that we were able to bring more material through the same size plant. The effect of which was we had about a 15% increase in capacity through the plant, which of course affected the economics. Peter Clausi: When do you think that plant will be constructed and operational? Rocky Smith: All the construction is really pending, the permits coming through in Tanzania and the required financial raise, so whenever those happen we will start. That will take us about 15 to 18 months to build both these plants. It’s a little bit difficult for me to say exactly when these other two things are going to happen. We’re making some progress in Tanzania. It’s been since July last year when they changed the mining law. Everyone kind of stopped their process. But Tanzania is getting ready to start working the backlog of mining licenses and we get that from the mining minister, the deputy mining minister and the commissioner of mining. Everyone is pretty much saying the same thing that they’ve got to set this commission, once that happens they will start working through this long list of mine projects that are there...to access the complete interview, click here Disclaimer: Peak Resources Ltd. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.
Views: 328 InvestorIntel
Molycorp CEO Expects to Beat China in Rare Earth Metals
 
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Molycorp CEO Expects to Beat China in Rare Earth Metals
Views: 2293 HedgeAnalystCom
Molycorp's Smith Says Rare Earth Prices Are Sustainable
 
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Oct. 28 (Bloomberg) -- Mark A. Smith, president and chief executive officer of Molycorp Inc., owner of the world's largest non-Chinese deposit of rare-earth metals, talks about demand for the minerals. Rare-earth prices have jumped after China, the source of more than 90 percent of worldwide supplies, cut its second-half export quota. Smith speaks from Denver, Colorado, with Susan Li on Bloomberg Television's "First Up." (Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 621 Bloomberg
PRIMELOX LANDAMERICA LLC / MOLYCORP RARE EARTH MINE / MEXICO - MT PASS CA / TX 1.mpg
 
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Views: 256 PRIMELOX1
Rare Earth Mining Stocks in a Bubble
 
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Rare Earth Mining Stocks in a Bubble
Views: 904 HedgeAnalystCom
name of mining machine rare earths
 
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More Details : http://wwa.stonecrushersolution.org/solutions/solutions.html we will provide a professional answer and quality of services. If this video does not meet your needs I apologize here. Visit Website: http://www.gospellightbaptistschool.com Contact Us For Help: http://www.gospellightbaptistschool.com/chat.html Why safe nuclear will rely on rare earth minerals, ZDNet Why safe nuclear will rely on rare earth minerals. Reactors powered by thorium rather than uranium would dramatically reduce nuclear power's weapons proliferation risk. Japan's Rare Earth Mining on Pacific Ocean Floor Puts Marine The rare earths have been found at depths of 3,500 to 6,000 meters (11,500, 20,000 ft) below the ocean surface at 78 locations in international waters in an Rare Earth Miner Molycorp Explains Why It’s for Real The sudden stock rise in Molycorp, , which wants to mine rare earth elements in California and ultimately produce magnets from those elements for electric motors and rare earth mining crusher listed company, Stone Quarry Plant rare earth mining crusher listed company . Molycorp,Rare Earth Metals; Rare Metals; Laboratory; Environment; History; Molycorp Zibo; Molycorp Jiangyin; Rare Rare Earth Elements in Coal Deposits, a Prospectivity The U.S. May Be “Producing” Over 40,000 Tons of Rare Earth Elements Annually FromTons of Rare Earth Elements Annually From Coal Mining ? LTI is conducting aLTI Can The U.S. Break China's Stranglehold On Rare Earth Metals Can The U.S. Break China's Stranglehold On Rare Earth Metals? These elements are the building blocks of a modern society, and China has all of them. A brighter future for rare earth prices, Mining Australia An ongoing Chinese government crackdown on illegal rare earth mining is finally paying dividends for the country. Rare Earth Elements, National Geographic The Secret Ingredients of Everything From smart phones to hybrid vehicles to cordless power drills, devices we all desire are made with a pinch of rare earths Sea holds treasure trove of rare, earth elements : Nature News The rare, earth elements Despite the name, rare earths aren including copper and nickel as well as rare earths. Commercial mining of Metals: Articles about their properties, geology and use. Metals such as gold, copper, silver, lead and rare earths are essential for construction and modern technology. Rare earth processing: a complicated proposition SUNDANCE, Mining and processing rare earth elements is a particularly complicated endeavor. Unlike other minerals such as gold and silver, rare earth Forget Lithium , , It's Rare Earth Minerals That Are in Short The availability of lithium is a well, known concern with electric vehicle batteries, but much less reported is the concentration of the rare earth minerals Pele Mountain, Eco Ridge Mine Pele’s flagship property is its 100, percent owned Eco Ridge Mine Rare Earths and Uranium Project. Eco Ridge is located in Elliot Lake, Ontario, a proven mining camp Who Owns The West? Mining Claims in America's West Name of Mine Location of Mine Mine Status Metal Mined Owner or Parent Company of Owner; Argentum: Esmeralda County, CA: Open: Rare earths: Columbus S.m., Llc Mining Machinery for Coal, Sand / Iron Ore Crushing and Rare Earth Machine. Rare earth mining crushing rocks mineral processing system Find the Right . LM Vertical Grinding Mill; HPC Hydraulic Cone Crusher; Sand rare earth metals, Yale Environment 360 A shortage of 'rare earth' metals, Likewise, the Mount Weld mine for rare earths in Name : Email address : Comment : Rare Earth Elements, Geoscience Australia The largest Rare Earth Elements Although there is no current production of rare earths in Australia, mining begun in 2007 at the Mount Weld deposit in Western Largest Known Rare Earth Mineral Deposit Discovered Corporation for rights to develop all rare, earth, element Corporation Mining Pacific Century Rare Earth Mineral rare earths were supplied rare earth metals mining machinery iron ore and rare earth; rare earth metals mining machinery; enhanced gravity rare earth mineral recovery; machine supplier for mines rare earth; Contact Us. Argus Rare Earths, Argus Media Argus Rare Earths is the leading independent source of impartial rare earths pricing and market analysis. Surging Rare, Earth Prices Spur Mining in Kazakhstan Surging rare, earth prices are spurring developments of deposits in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Greenland as China cuts exports of the metals used in Chemical Extraction Process In Mining Rare Earth Elements chemical extraction process in mining rare earth elements in How Much
Views: 27 Dacuk Porty
Molycorp's Smith Sees China Limiting Rare Earth Exports
 
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Sept. 26 (Bloomberg) -- Mark Smith, chief executive officer of Molycorp Inc., talks about China's rare earth metals' production and exports. Smith also discusses Molycorp's Mountain Pass, California, project. He speaks with Pimm Fox on Bloomberg Television's "Taking Stock." (Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 539 Bloomberg
Lifton on the collapse of rare earth prices in China and Neo Materials' survival
 
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September 3, 2015 — In a special InvestorIntel interview, Publisher Tracy Weslosky speaks with Jack Lifton, Sr. Editor for InvestorIntel about the collapse of rare earth prices in China and the impact on the rare earth markets. He also explains what really happened with Molycorp and why Neo Material Technologies still has a pulse. He then explains how at the Global Technology Metals Market summit on October 14th he will be presenting his thoughts on “The impact of China’s economic turmoil upon the technology metals supply chains and how to lessen the impact in the future.” He clarifies that he will be addressing the problems, identifying the hurdles and concluding with real solutions for the entire supply chain of technology metals. Tracy Weslosky: What's happening with Molycorp and what is your conclusion as Robin Bromby's latest piece suggest that this is an absolute catastrophe for our market sector. Do you agree? Jack Lifton: It's not good news for the market sector because so many people have focused on only Molycorp. I haven't made a secret of the fact that I thought their business model was flawed from the first day in that they were focusing on producing the least desirable sector of the rare earths, for the most part, of any light rare earth deposit. 75% or 80% is cerium and lanthanum, which currently are the least valued rare earths in volume production. The fact is the Molycorp mine has only 11% or 12% of neodymium and praseodymium, the magnet metals. Compare it with Lynas at 23% or I think that Peak Resources might even have a higher percentage than that. There are many deposits that have a better percentage. The Molycorp situation was that it was high-grade and high hype, but it was really just a part of the solution. The solution is the total supply chain and always has been. It was not a good idea. It failed. It's not a surprise that when it’s not a good idea – it fails. I think that last year's contribution of Molycorp to the global rare earths market was basically unimportant. I accept the fact that it is a sad day for shareholders of Molycorp who were long-term shareholders. They've lost all the value, but in general this has been like a rock thrown in the ocean. The ripples have long ago settled. Molycorp's disappearance is of no particular impact on the genuine rare earth market. Tracy Weslosky: Before we leave the Molycorp topic, let's talk about Neo Material Technologies. Jack Lifton: Well, I don't know what's happening with the ownership, but Neo Material hasn’t missed a beat in 10 years. Neo Material never depended on the Mountain Pass Mine for raw materials. It's always been able to buy raw material in China at much lower prices. In my opinion, if they took anything from Molycorp, California, it was for political purposes in their own company's bureaucracy. If Neo survives it'll be just fine. It's a well-managed, well-run company and it's doing the right thing. Tracy Weslosky: Our headline from Hongpo this morning was the collapse of the rare earth prices in China. I keep reading about the collapse of rare earth prices but I think these are all overstatements. You're the senior expert here between the two of us. Jack, do we have a collapse of the Chinese rare earth prices? …click here, to access the rest of this interview
Views: 840 InvestorIntel
The Global Race for Rare Earths
 
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The Bureau for International Reporting travels to Canada's Northwest Territories, the California desert and China to report on a looming supply crunch of rare earth metals, key ingredients to green technology and many defense weapons systems.
Views: 29511 TheBIRorg
A High Grade Rare Earth Play at Mountain Pass
 
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October 3, 2012 -- Al Shefsky, Director, President and CEO of Pele Mountain Resources Inc. (TSXV: GEM | OTCQX: GOLDF) (PeleMountain.com) talks with Tracy Weslosky, Publisher of ProEdgeWire (ProEdgeWire.com) about the critical importance of heavy rare earth rare elements (HREEs) and US self-sustainability in this sector. Pele Mountain Resources' flag ship Eco Ridge Mine Rare Earths and Uranium Project is located in Elliot Lake, Ontario, which was historically the major source of heavy rare earths, yttrium and uranium production in North America. The competitive advantages at Eco Ridge include the large size of the deposit, outstanding existing infrastructure, well understood mineralogy and metallurgy, and a world class development team. Providing an overview of Pele Mountain Resources' Mountain Pass Project, located only 1,800 meters from Molycorp Inc.'s Mountain Pass Mine, Al tells investors that this property is yielding high grades of rare earths at surface, up to 10.67%. Investors also learn the history of this rare earth project that dates back to 1949 when the property was originally staked by a prospector named Peter "Pop" Simon. Disclaimer: Pele Mountain Resources Inc. is a ProEdgeWire: Rare Earths & Critical Minerals sponsor.
Views: 297 InvestorIntel
Smith Says Molycorp Sees `Opportunity Window' on Demand
 
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Jan. 4 (Bloomberg) -- Mark Smith, chief executive officer of Molycorp Inc., talks about the demand for rare-earth materials and the company's strategy to increase mining productivity. Molycorp, owner of the world's largest rare-earth deposit outside of China, may double its planned production to help meet global demand after China cut export quotas. Smith speaks with Erik Schatzker on Bloomberg Television's "InsideTrack." (Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 459 Bloomberg
Rare Earth Elements Crisis
 
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Rare Earth Metals aren't as widely know as oil for example. But they'll soon become pretty notorious. These minerals are essential part of almost every technological device on the market today, like cell phones, cameras, HYBRID CARS, wind turbines and even military devices. The fact that China currently produces 97% of the world's supply, the results of exports halt will be disastrous. Meanwhile, rare earth ore-rich USA only has several development stage companies, trying to deal with that problem: Greenland Minerals and Energy Ltd. PINK:GDLNF Molycorp, Inc NASDAQ:MCP Rare Element Resources Ltd. NYSE:REE Medallion Resources Ltd. PINK:MLLOF Ucore Rare Metals, Inc. PINK:UURAF While the government takes the usual stance: postpone taking precautions, until the situation becomes unbearable. We do not own the rights to this video.
Views: 501 TMHarris1000
Rainbow Rare Earths looks to open second mining area in fourth quarter
 
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Martin Eales, chief executive of Rainbow Rare Earths LTD (LON:RBW), tells Proactive Investors they sold 350 tonnes of concentrate in the three months to the end of June 2018 - up significantly from the 125 tonnes sold in the previous quarter - as the ramp-up to full production continues at the company's mine in Burundi. Gakara is one of the highest grade rare earth element mining projects globally, with an estimated in-situ grade of 47-67% Total Rare Earth Oxide (TREO). Eales adds they're now looking to commence operations at their second mining area - Murambi - in the fourth quarter of this year to help them reach the targeted production run rate of around 5,000tpa or 400tpm by the end of 2018.
Worldwide supply of critical rare earth elements about to expand
 
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Tucked in the middle of the Desert, near the Nevada Border, Molycorp's Mountain Pass, California mine specialises in finding rare earth elements hiding in regular-looking rocks.
Views: 104 techworld
Uncertainty at Molycorp and strong developments at Tasman, Northern Minerals and Alkane
 
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July 17, 2014 -- Tracy Weslosky, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of InvestorIntel speaks with Jack Lifton, Founding Principal of Technology Metals Research (TMR), LLC talk about the state of the rare earths sector, starting with Molycorp (NYSE: MCP). Molycorp has been using up cash at an alarming rate and it may well have to restructure and re-finance to survive. Nevertheless, Molycorp still has sufficient cash to be able to pursue new suitors, according to Jack, and this makes them a target for the 'turnaround artist'. Jack says that he expects much activity at Molycorp but not the kind needed "to produce rare earths". Tracy suggests that Molycorp may well be ready to make some important management changes and that the current CEO, Geoff Bedford, will be one of those paying a high price. Jack suggests that the situation is not unlike what happened at Lynas (ASX: LYC), where a 'technical' CEO, Eric Noyrez, was replaced by one with finance background. As for Noyrez, he is still at Lynas to help deal with administrative matters and he is supposed to continue through August, returning to France in September. However, Jack, who will be visiting France at the end of July, says that he would not be surprised to run into Noyrez, expecting the transition period to 'accelerate'. Of course, the rare earths sector is much bigger than Molycorp and Lynas and in particular -- three additional companies have been drawing considerable attention from investors and media. On July 10, Tasman Metals Ltd. (TSXV: TSM | NYSE MKT: TAS) announced that a heavy rare earths-rich concentrate was been precipitated during the hydrometallurgical testing at its Norra Karr heavy rare earths project. Jack says he is quite impressed by Tasman and that he will disclose additional reason for this optimism in the next few weeks. Northern Minerals ('Northern', ASX: NTU) is one of the rare earth stocks that has been performing well in the markets. Jack recently spoke to Northern's CEO and Managing Director, George Bauk, noting, "They are really headed in a good direction....as far as I know Northern has the largest xenotime deposit anywhere, and I'm not surprised that there's so much Chinese interest. What is surprising is that they did not want to hand it over to Chinese investors." More significantly, the Chinese's interest in Northern reinforces Jack's theory that "China is worried about their supply of the heavy rare earths such as dysprosium or yttrium: remember that xenotime is 60% yttrium and 8-9% dysprosium: "I'd rather have a Northern Minerals than ten Molycorps", says Jack. The Australian-Japanese free trade agreement that was signed a few weeks ago also brings good news, especially for Alkane Resources (ASX: ALK | OTCQX: ANLKY). Alkane has an offtake agreement with the Japanese magnet manufacturer Shin-Etsu. Jack observes that Australia has no demand for technology metals. Any company, like Alkane, mining technology metals in Australia must first find the right export market for that product. Jack and Tracy also discuss Stans Energy (TSXV: HRE) and the ruling from an international arbitration court in Moscow demanding the Kyrgyz government to pay the Company the sum of USD$ 118 million in compensation. Jack does not envy Stans, noting that getting their money is going to be challenging, but he leaves them with a question: "what process was used at the Stans plant to separate rare earths. Yes, I understand it was solvent extraction, but what did they do after to purify it, because there have been a lot of developments in downstream technology and I would like to know what the Russians have done." Finally, Jack and Tracy review some developments at some of the rare earth mining companies in the United States including Texas Rare Earth Resources, Ucore and Rare Element Resources, which Jack believes will have some surprising announcements. Tracy adds US Rare Earths to that list, leaving Jack with a note to call... Disclaimer: All of the companies that Tracy Weslosky, Jack Lifton and all of the InvestorIntel editorial columnists are disclosed in their biographies. All clients of InvestorIntel are posted on the right hand columns on www.InvestorIntel.com of the various sections on InvestorIntel, and are linked directly to their sites. For more information, contact [email protected]
Views: 892 InvestorIntel
Ucore advances on the road to heavy rare earth production
 
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Tracy Weslosky, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of InvestorIntel interviews Jim McKenzie, President and CEO of Ucore Rare Metals Inc. (TSXV: UCU | OTCQX: UURAF) to discuss the company's recently released resource update for its flagship Bokan Dotson-Ridge Rare Earth (REE) Project in southeast Alaska, as well as some of the other milestones Ucore has achieved to date, Jim's take on the recent WTO ruling against China and its REE industry, and what investors can look forward to as Ucore advances on the road to REE production. Ucore's 100% owned Bokan Dotson-Ridge Project is particularly enriched with heavy rare earth elements (HREEs), including the critical elements dysprosium, terbium and yttrium. Tracy starts by asking Jim to comment on Ucore's recent upgraded resource estimate. "That was a significant piece of information we just put out," explains McKenzie. "It was the culmination of $12 million in expenditures, so even though the release came out and it's exhausted in one day, the fact is that was the result of a great deal of effort. And we are very proud of it. The resource estimate has been upgraded to the better part of an indicated resource, from what was previously an inferred resourced. We're now at 'indicated;' the highest is 'measured' and we are moving in that direction." Recapping the sizable accomplishments made by Ucore this year, Jim stated: "2013 has been a gangbuster year for us, notwithstanding the fact that the resource capital markets have been a bit beleaguered, but internally -- operationally -- we've just had a tremendous year. The first deliverable that we came through with was the Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA), delivered in Q1 of this year. We think the PEA was amongst the 'best of breed' in the junior rare earth resource space; tremendous figures are associated with that. We had one of the highest internal rates of returns (IRR) in the space at 43% and a very, very respectable net present value (NPV). I think the most import figure that we came out with in the PEA was the CAPEX to get into production. It was estimated a little bit north of $200 million, which really is a small amount relative to not only the other players in the space, but to mining in general." Regarding Ucore's continued success, McKenzie commented: "I believe the fact that we're in the US market -- addressing one of the largest and most prolific consumers of rare earths in the world -- is a big reason why we've performed reasonably well. 2012 was actually a phenomenal year for us in the markets. We outperformed, I think, by and large the entire space. This year, it's been more a matter of 'holding your own' in a very challenging market. We've succeeded in hitting benchmark after benchmark on the road to construction and production. We have delivered the resource, we've upgraded the resource, we've delivered the PEA, and we have delivered numerous other interim geopolitical benchmarks." In closing, Tracy asks Jim to discuss what upcoming milestones investors can look forward to from Ucore. "The two remaining objectives we are looking to achieve over the year and a half to two years are delivering the Feasibility Study (FS), which is the ultimate document for any resource company looking to go into production." McKenzie explains. "The FS we are looking to deliver next year -- and a lot of smaller, subordinate items are feeding into that. The other deliverable is the NEPA permitting process. We are looking to trigger that in 2014. Every mine in the free world has to go through a permitting process of sorts -- and certainly being in the US, we are no exception -- and we will pursue that as quickly as we can." Other topics include forthcoming updates to Ucore's metallurgical process, the State of Alaska and US Forest Service's continued strong support for Ucore, infrastructure at Bokan Dotson-Ridge, and off-take discussions. Disclaimer: Ucore Rare Metals Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel.
Views: 2046 InvestorIntel
Molycorp Minerals Video
 
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Views: 5886 mocrodesign
US Rare Earths CEO: Beware Chinese Mineral Mischief
 
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China currently dominates the vital rare earth market in the world, leaving the U.S. highly vulnerable in the event of an embargo or trade war, says Kevin Cassidy, CEO of U.S. Rare Earths. Rare earth minerals are essential for use in technology and defense products. Cassidy says his mining company will be supplying its heavy and critical rare earth minerals in the U.S. once it ramps up production later this year from the 25,000 acres it holds in Montana, Idaho and Colorado. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
Molycorp Surges as China Raises Rare Earth Deal Stakes
 
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March 7 (Bloomberg) -- China's control of rare-earth metals is providing Molycorp Inc., owner of the largest U.S. deposit of the minerals, with the most-valuable currency in the industry to pursue acquisitions. Bloomberg's Deirdre Bolton reports. (Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 250 Bloomberg
TRER's Anthony Marchese talks Molycorp, Jack Lifton and on Round Top's Heavy Rare Earth Project
 
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July 18, 2014 -- Tracy Weslosky, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Investor Intel speaks to Anthony Marchese, Chairman of Texas Rare Earth Resources Corp. ('TRER', OTCQX: TRER) about the state of Molycorp as well as TRER's world class deposit (including beryllium and a 70% heavy rare earth concentration) with outstanding infrastructure in Texas at the Round Top rare earth minerals project. Anthony suggests that as Molycorp's share price continues its steady decline, in the last several days there have been many rumors that "there are entities that are acquiring Molycorp's bonds in the expectation that the Company will experience a significant restructuring, which will allow these 'entities' to eventually control the Company. Anthony says that as rough as it has been for Molycorp investors, it may yet get worse. Yet, many professionals in the investment sector still associates the entire rare earths industry with Molycorp. "So my concern is that those who follow Molycorp believe that somehow Molycorp's price movement and problems are endemic to the entire industry. And this is not the case." Molycorp is concentrating on light rare earths, while China, which could supply the world with large quantities of light rare earths, is starting to look for heavy rare earths around the world and especially in Australia. Tracy points out that even as she and Jack Lifton had already seen the heavy vs. light rare earths demand dynamic taking shape five years ago: "most people don't understand the complexities while Molycorp presented itself as having heavies. Anthony says that Molycorp's heavies are actually extracted in China. "I believe that Mountain Pass in California does not have heavies." Anthony talks about the election of noted rare earths industry expert Jack Lifton to its Board of Directors last September. Jack has been 'a very independent thinker' and very influential in forming TRER's strategy. TRER's deposit shows a very clear mineralogical pattern which has proven to be heap leachable, which is similar to what might be found in China. As a result, TRER is looking for a strategic partner in its next phase of development. Nick Pingitore, a geologist at the University of Texas, and a Board member, is the architect of the heap leach processing approach. TRER's land and the China clay deposits are the only REE deposits in the world to use simple heap leach processing. Anthony says that TRER will have more announcements about the metallurgy in the near future and that they are making tremendous strides in this area. Ultimately, TRER is also about low CAPEX and significant profitability. Texas Rare Earth Resources' revised CAPEX was reduced from $2.1 billion to approximately $293 million, among the world's lowest -cost REE projects. Disclaimer: Texas Rare Earth Resources Corp.is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel.com.
Views: 626 InvestorIntel
Running From Rare Earth Metals
 
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June 30 -- From smartphones to ballistic missiles and hybrid cars, so much of our high tech works because of rare earth metals. Yet the U.S.' biggest rare earth miner Molycorp has filed for bankruptcy. Bloomberg's Ramy Inocencio explains what rare earth metals are and why Molycorp isn't the only miner on the brink of a bust.
Views: 2308 Bloomberg
Rare Earth Minerals Shortage Imminent!
 
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Rare Earth Magnets, the crucial element of all types of technology: medicine, green energy and national security, is now almost completely being produced by China. While the government is begging China not to halt exports, the US Rare Earth now development stage "Industry" is trying to push through the dire domestic regulations. Ucore Rare Metals, Inc. PINK:UURAF Medallion Resources Ltd. PINK:MLLOF Rare Element Resources Ltd. NYSE:REE Molycorp, Inc NASDAQ:MCP Lynas Corp. Ltd. . PINK:LYSDY; PINK:LYSCF Alkane Exploration NL PINK:ALKEF Greenland Minerals and Energy Ltd. PINK:GDLNF
Views: 1302 Hotstocked Videos
Kennedy Rare-Earth-Elements (REE) Briefing to IAEA, United Nations
 
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On June 27th James Kennedy presented to the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency at the IAEA world headquarters in Vienna. The technical paper is titled: "Creating a Multi-National Development Platform: Thorium Energy & Rare Earth Value Chain" written by John Kutsch and James Kennedy. The paper discusses recent U.S. Federal legislation that offers a private sector solution to the economic and national security issues resulting from China's monopoly control of rare earths. This legislation also provides a private sector solution for the long term safe storage of Thorium and the commercial development of Thorium energy systems and industrial products. Regarding Rare earths, the paper and presentation also answer the question: Why can't Molycorp, Lynas or any other 'western' rare earth company succeed? Mr. Kennedy demonstrates that China's production and market advantage in rare earth minerals is largely the result of NRC and IAEA "Source Material" regulations with unintended consequences. Source Material: Materials containing any ratio or combination of Thorium and Uranium above .05%. Producing or holding these materials within the regulatory threshold (.05%) requires extensive and wide-ranging licensing, storage, transportation, remediation disposal and compliance costs, including prohibitive liability and bonding issues. Consequently any potential supplier of byproduct / co-product rare earth resources that would be designated as "source material' disposes of these valuable resources to avoid liability and compliance issues. NRC / IAEA regulations regarding "Source Material" played a key roll in undermining the economic viability of all 'western' rare earth producers and are a critical factor in China's current 'market advantage'. Producers like Molycorp and Lynas, with low Thorium deposits, can never compete with China. Domestic Rare Earth Element resources are abundant and available: U.S mining companies currently mine as much as 50% of global Rare Earth demand every year. But these resources are diverted in tailings lakes or are redistributed back into the host ore body, due to NRC and IAEA regulations defining Monazite and other Thorium bearing rare earth resources as "Source Material". Mr. Kennedy also outlines recent U.S. Federal legislation that would solve the "Thorium Problem" by creating a federally chartered multinational Thorium Energy and Industrial Products Corporation (Thorium Bank). Privately funded and operated, this would decouple thorium from rare earth production. The Thorium Corporation would also have Congressional Authority to develop Thorium energy systems and industrial products (H.R. 4883, S. 2006) https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr4883 This was also crafted to address the U.S. Weapons Systems 100% Dependent on China for Rare Earths. http://thoriumenergyalliance.com/downloads/TEAC6/USWeaponsChinese.pdf Federal Legislation governing Strategic Materials, 10 USC 2533b, does not specify rare earths, but includes metal alloys containing limited amounts of manganese, silicon, copper, or aluminum, chromium, cobalt, columbium, molybdenum, nickel, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, nickel and iron-nickel, cobalt, Titanium and Zirconium alloys. Federal Regulations require that these materials be melted in the U.S. Most of these materials are utilized in rare earth alloys, magnets and components in the defense industry. http://ThREEConsulting.com/ http://www.iaea.org/ http://ThoriumRemix.com/ [v14]
Views: 5844 gordonmcdowell
Mining rare metals with super grass | DW English
 
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A German researcher is experimenting with different varieties of reed grass to see how good they are at sucking up rare earth elements which can then be extracted and are sorely needed for industrial production. More Environment Videos: http://www.dw.com/en/top-stories/environment/s-11798
Views: 1062 DW News
Lifton says Ucore's rare earth technology will be innovative and disruptive
 
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April 26, 2016 -- Ucore Rare Metals Inc. (TSXV: UCU | OTCQX: UURAF | FSE: U9U) is a development-phase company focused on rare metals resources, extraction and beneficiation technologies. On March 3, 2015, Ucore announced the right to acquire a controlling ownership interest in the exclusive rights to IBC SuperLig® technology for rare earths and multi-metallic tailings processing applications in North America and associated world markets. The company has a 100% ownership stake in Bokan- Dotson Ridge, the highest-grade heavy rare earth project within the United States, and with the emphasis being on the dysprosium, terbium and yttrium content. Last week, in Part 1 of a special interview, InvestorIntel spoke with technology metals advisor Jack Lifton, who explained how SuperLig® technology made Ucore “the company to beat” in the non-Chinese tech metals refining space. Now, in this second part, Jack elaborates on those points and talks about ◾The “culling of the herd” – how only the real REE companies are left ◾How it will be possible to recycle rare metals just as we do copper, lead and platinum ◾How Ucore can make Western industrial nations competitive in the rare earth sector Jack Lifton: Ucore’s output product in the rare earth area is immediately of great interest to the great industrial nations; the United States, Germany, Japan, Korea. None of them is currently producing rare earths from mines or processing rare earths in any way. Every one of them - added together 50% at least of the world’s rare earths go to those four nations. That’s your market. The industrialized nations for - majority of course for consumer devices, but a significant minority for military. There are two ways to look at the demand for rare earth permanent magnets or the materials to make them and we’re – the reason I mention we’re at permanent magnets, they’re the overwhelming majority of end use of rare earths. There are two reasons to be optimistic. One is that China is using more and more of these materials every year and simply cannot produce enough to meet its own demand. But better than that is that there is no source of these materials for the rest of the world, none. What’s the demand? The demand is will people continue to buy cell phones? Will people continue to buy automobiles, washing machines, vacuum cleaners? Every one of them uses rare earth permanent magnets. They’re manufactured in the United States, Germany, Japan, Korea. That’s where they’re really manufactured. Those nations produce most of them. Those nations do not have domestic supply or domestic self sufficiency. You are bringing to the market a competitive edge for the western industrial nations. As an American, I’m proud to say you’re going to be in Utah and it’s going to help us get back to being self sufficient in production of consumer goods which we cannot be without plants like yours...to access the complete video, click here Disclaimer: Ucore Rare Metals Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel.
Views: 6747 InvestorIntel
Think One Oil Crisis Is Already Enogh? Think Twice!
 
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What's common between development stage rare earth companies like Ucore Rare Metals, Inc. PINK:UURAF Medallion Resources Ltd. PINK:MLLOF Rare Element Resources Ltd. NYSE:REE Molycorp, Inc NASDAQ:MCP Lynas Corp. Ltd. . PINK:LYSDY; PINK:LYSCF Alkane Exploration NL PINK:ALKEF Greenland Minerals and Energy Ltd. PINK:GDLNF ? They're our only option to keep having technology, national security and jobs, if China halts its Rare Earth Minerals exports.
Views: 506 Hotstocked Videos
Rare Earth Elements Crisis Could End Green Energy Revolution
 
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Rare Earth Metals aren't as widely know as oil for example. But they'll soon become pretty notorious. These minerals are essential part of almost every technological device on the market today, like cell phones, cameras, HYBRID CARS, wind turbines and even military devices. The fact that China currently produces 97% of the world's supply, the results of exports halt will be disastrous. Meanwhile, rare earth ore-rich USA only has several development stage companies, trying to deal with that problem: Greenland Minerals and Energy Ltd. PINK:GDLNF Molycorp, Inc NASDAQ:MCP Rare Element Resources Ltd. NYSE:REE Medallion Resources Ltd. PINK:MLLOF Ucore Rare Metals, Inc. PINK:UURAF While the government takes the usual stance: postpone taking precautions, until the situation becomes unbearable.
Views: 8344 Hotstocked Videos
Jack Lifton on the future of rare earths, Professor Kingsnorth, a market turnaround & Molycorp
 
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October 13, 2013 -- Tracy Weslosky, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of InvestorIntel, interviews Jack Lifton, founding principal of Technology Metals Research LLC and senior editor at InvestorIntel to discusses his recent five-part series -- exclusive to InvestorIntel -- on the future forecast of rare earths, a few words to Professor Dudley Kingsnorth, a possible rare earth market turnaround, Molycorp, why it is wrong to refer to REEs as commodities, and the urgent need for North America to develop a total rare earth supply chain, among other topics. Addressing the very widely read 'Lifton: Unchained' series on InvestorIntel, Tracy asks Jack to comment on the misunderstanding regarding some of his commentary regarding Professor Kingsnorth. Jack explained he was merely underscoring some of the assumptions made in Kingsnorth's forecast and meant no disrespect at all to Dudley. "If Dudley is listening, I certainly apologize for any misunderstanding," explains Lifton. Jack asks InvestorIntel readers (especially commenters) to read his words carefully, and then react intellectually, not emotionally. When Tracy asked if the REE market is turning around, Jack commented: "Because of my involvement in the industry as a consultant (and now as a board member to a couple of companies), I can tell you that there is more sophisticated interested in the rare earth market, then there has been in the last chaotic year. But the market (institutional investors on down) has now learned that it is not about 'pounds in the ground;' that's not what this is about. It's about our access to the pounds in the ground, which is not about shovels. It's about chemistry, processing engineering and boring subjects like 'programmable controllers' for chemical reactors. That's what it is about. If the chemists can come up with ways of extracting these materials from where we find them -- at any level, whether it's 100% material or .001% -- if they do that economically... notice the word 'economic'. If it's economical, it's practical. Otherwise, it's not. So when you show me a mountain of high-grade material that is encased in silicate rock that cannot be processed; that's not a (potential) mine... that's just a curiosity." Jack updates readers and clarifies his position on Molycorp, explains why rare earths are, in fact, technology metals and why he doesn't like people using the term 'rare earths commodities.' Finally, Jack discusses US strategy on rare earths and why it is so critical that we develop a North American total rare earth supply chain industry.
Views: 1479 InvestorIntel
Molycorp's Smith SeeModerate Growth in Rare-Earth Demand: Video
 
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Sept. 30 (Bloomberg) -- Mark A. Smith, chief executive officer of Molycorp Inc., discusses the outlook for rare-earth metals demand and the U.S. economy. Molycorp is owner of the world's largest non-Chinese deposit of rare-earth metals. Smith talks with Deirdre Bolton on Bloomberg Television's "InsideTrack." (This report is an excerpt of the full interview. Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 1379 Bloomberg
1h53m11s25f Thorium is Everywhere - Rare Earth Mines will Pay to Get Rid of Thorium - TR2016a
 
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http://ThoriumRemix.com/ Thorium is an element found everywhere. It is junk. Rare earth mining operations would just as soon pay you to take it off their hands. Jim Kennedy: If you're pulling out rare earths, and your deposit has- let's say- 8% rare earths, it may have 14% thorium. Every known way to extract rare earths from their mineral concentrates- thorium just literally drops out like a rock and you have it. The thorium is free. So it's going to be the most valuable commodity in the world, with almost no value.
Views: 143 Gordon McDowell

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