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Mining
 
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019 - Mining In this video Paul Andersen explains how mining is used to extract valuable minerals from the Earth's crust. Surface and subsurface mining are used to extract ore which is then processed. A discussion of ecosystem impacts and legislation is also included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cateb, M. (2010). Português: Cobre e latão para soldas. Lingote de prata 950 e chapa de prata. Liga para ser adicionada à prata, com cobre e germânio. Grânulos de prata fina. Foto : Mauro Cateb, joalheiro brasileiro. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metals_for_jewellery.jpg English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg File:MKingHubbert.jpg. (2011, September 13). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MKingHubbert.jpg&oldid=450215564 Jones, N. (2007). English: Sand and gravel strata on the southern edge of Coxford Wood The sand and gravel quarry goes right up to the edge of wood. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sand_and_gravel_strata_on_the_southern_edge_of_Coxford_Wood_-_geograph.org.uk_-_610732.jpg Jyi1693. (2006). English: Seawater photographed from aboard the MV Virgo out of Singapore, 2006. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_water_Virgo.jpg KVDP. (2009). English: A schematic showing the locations of certain ores in the world. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simplified_world_mining_map_1.png printer, -G. F. Nesbitt & Co. (1850). English: Sailing card for the clipper ship California, depicting scenes from the California gold rush. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Clipper_500.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg Vance, R. H. (1850). English: “Photomechanical reproduction of the 1850(?) daguerreotype by R. H. Vance shows James Marshall standing in front of Sutter’s sawmill, Coloma, California, where he discovered gold.” Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sutters_Mill.jpg
Views: 62747 Bozeman Science
3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Terrible! 2/3
 
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Nuclear energy might be a failed experiment. In over sixty years the technology has not only failed to keep its promise of cheap, clean and safe energy, it also caused major catastrophes and enabled more nuclear weapons while the nuclear waste problem is still not solved. Why nuclear energy is awesome: http://bit.ly/1F1V8Mc Brief Introduction into nuclear energy: http://bit.ly/1CdmAIk If you want to support us and get a free audiobook go to www.audible.com/nutshell Also thanks a lot for the help to Michael Büker! Follow him @emtiu Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or on Behance to say hi! http://kurzgesagt.org https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://twitter.com/Kurz_Gesagt http://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt http://www.behance.net/Kurzgesagt The music was composed by Thomas Veith, you can get it here: https://soundcloud.com/epicmountain/sets/kurzgesagt-nuclear https://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/nuclear-pro https://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/nuclear-contra http://www.epic-mountain.com Thanks a lot to our lovely Patrons for their ongoing support! Stephen Bassett, Raphael Hviding, Sam Elitzer, Andrzej Rejman, OpenGG, Andrew Jagasothy, jordan gardner, AgentK, Mehmet Sevil, Carly Tawse, K A I, Kevin Dam, Charlie, Christopher Lang, Nat Ryall, Jeff Le, Nicholas Holtz, Devir Islas, Arnas Valeika, Kirstie, Francesca Monteiro, James Craver, Broderick, Duncan Cheong, Derek, Juan Manuel Corredor, Osric Lord-Williams, Scott Zell, Jeroen Koerts, Patrick Eyrich, tekbit, Chris Linardos, Tony Morley, Jónatan Nilsson, Nat Thomas Golder, Zr4g0n, Cody, Michal, Caroline Andrewes, Alex Kaplan, Tom Alexander Kutil, Vincent, Okan, Sasha C, KokLiang Lim, Marcelo, Mikel De Uranga, Dean Herbert, Anton Efimenko, trefmanic, Adam Smith, David Garcia Quintas, Gaëtan Duvaux, Eduardo Barbosa, maarten ligtenberg, Ghitea Andrei Paul, Ozan, Ryan, Larry Bunyard, Josh Maleszewski, Volodymyr Khomenko, Sebastian Laiseca, Chase, Michael Slade, Scarlet Barton, Matthew Gill, Aaron, Alexander Heavens, Alexander Ahn, Arrngrim, Fluffy19, Adam Primaeros, Jan Schmid, Sara Shah, Gard Fredrik Skuland, Veselin Kostadinov, Jonathan Velazquez Gore, Daniel, Philly Cashion, Seona Tea, Clayton Fussell, Daniel Gonzalez, Stephen Joseph DCruz, Morten, Dan Q, Thomas Lee, Finn Edwards, David Taylor, Corbin, Fabricio Godoy, Charles Kuang, Alan Feyaerts, Maximilian Ritter, Jesse MacLean, Matt Collins, Yousif, Jesse Powell, Dan Treasure, nga⁴, 冠瑋 陳, Wei Wong, Praveen Muthu, Jon Davis, Bahjat, Mike Mintz, Jem Arnold, Steffen Weng, Igor Benicio de Mesquita, Lars Vas Dias, Greeny Liu, Tibor Schiemann, dante harper, Bünyamin Tetik, Eli Fisker, Joe Pond, Jørgen Smalås, Gustavo, Tommi Mansikka, Dario Wünsch, Matthew Macomber, Daniel McCouid-Carr, Neelfyn, Muath, Edgar Duarte Ortega, Stephen Chen, Alipasha Sadri, Kevin P, Steven Ratner, Theo Alves Monteiro, Brucelow, José, Tony Montuori, Philipp Weber, Brad Wardell, David Davenport-Firth, Alexander Scheffer, Eric, Austin, Enrico, Hamad, Andrew Connor, Ignacio Flores, Tom Langford, Vaelohs, Peter Schuller, Bear, Brandy Alexander, Mark Govea, Alexander Kosenkov, Eric, Wesley Sheridan Montgomery, Artem Anchugov, Brandon Liu, Erven, varinder singh bal, Scott Laing, Philip Freeman, Gizem Gürkan, George Chearswat, Tim, Victor, Martin Fink-Jensen, Josh Allen, oscar gautama, Karl Snickars, Jennifer Hiller, Bruno Araújo, Maarten Bremer, Daniel OCL, Carlos Bohorquez, Elchus, RobPT, Hugo, Lethargicpanda, Amdrew, Minghan Ko, Mark Scheurwater, David Harbinson, Rikard Nyberg, Collin Banko, Florian Guitton, Jezariael Demos, Ajay Shekhar,  Nick Yonge, Jon Moroney, Eugene Cham, Renaud Savignard, James, Viktor Asklund, Ryan, somersault18:24, Ben Shackman, Pranab Shenoy, Terry Lipstein, Tim Carll, Javier de la Garza, Rory Bennett, Jan Berdel, Sieglinde Geisel, Jeff Churchill 3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Terrible! Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste?
 
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This documentary examines the environmental impact of that the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada have had on the environment. director, editor, narrator: Arthur Pequegnat
Views: 448 Arthur YUL
Atomic Africa: Clean Energy's Dirty Secrets (Environmental Documentary) | Spark
 
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An investigation into the nuclear industry and its actions in Africa, the film examines Africa’s power needs and the consequences of using nuclear energy. Africa’s development is being held back by its poor infrastructure and undersize power plants. Countries like Uganda can produce only a quarter of the energy needed, leading to daily power cuts with a disastrous impact on the economy. Companies like French nuclear giant Areva lobby aggressively for more power plants in Africa, but how safe are these new reactors? New nuclear power plants in Africa also mean more uranium mining, contaminating the environment and endangering the local population. First Released in 2013. Content Provided by DCD Rights. Any queries, contact us at [email protected] Subscribe to Spark for more amazing science, tech and engineering videos - https://goo.gl/LIrlur #Cleanemergy #science #technology #engineering #africa #efricanenergy #war #chaos #rebellion #electricity #nuclearpower #africanwarfare #nuke #uranium
Views: 5714 Spark
3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Awesome! 3/3
 
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Nuclear energy might have a lot of unused potential. Not only is it one of the best mid term solutions for global warming bit despite what gut feeling tells us, it has saved millions of lives. By investing more into better technologies we might be able to make nuclear energy finally save and clean forever. Why nuclear energy is terrible: http://bit.ly/1bPzeol Brief Introduction into nuclear energy: http://bit.ly/1CdmAIk Nuclear energy saves lives: http://bit.ly/1lttjFa If you want to support us and get a free audiobook go to www.audible.com/nutshell Also thanks a lot for the help to Michael Büker! Follow him @emtiu Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or on Behance to say hi! http://kurzgesagt.org https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://twitter.com/Kurz_Gesagt http://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt http://www.behance.net/Kurzgesagt The music was composed by Thomas Veith, you can get it here: https://soundcloud.com/epicmountain/sets/kurzgesagt-nuclear https://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/nuclear-pro https://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/nuclear-contra http://www.epic-mountain.com Thanks a lot to our lovely Patrons for their ongoing support! Stephen Bassett, Raphael Hviding, Sam Elitzer, Andrzej Rejman, OpenGG, Andrew Jagasothy, jordan gardner, AgentK, Mehmet Sevil, Carly Tawse, K A I, Kevin Dam, Charlie, Christopher Lang, Nat Ryall, Jeff Le, Nicholas Holtz, Devir Islas, Arnas Valeika, Kirstie, Francesca Monteiro, James Craver, Broderick, Duncan Cheong, Derek, Juan Manuel Corredor, Osric Lord-Williams, Scott Zell, Jeroen Koerts, Patrick Eyrich, tekbit, Chris Linardos, Tony Morley, Jónatan Nilsson, Nat Thomas Golder, Zr4g0n, Cody, Michal, Caroline Andrewes, Alex Kaplan, Tom Alexander Kutil, Vincent, Okan, Sasha C, KokLiang Lim, Marcelo, Mikel De Uranga, Dean Herbert, Anton Efimenko, trefmanic, Adam Smith, David Garcia Quintas, Gaëtan Duvaux, Eduardo Barbosa, maarten ligtenberg, Ghitea Andrei Paul, Ozan, Ryan, Larry Bunyard, Josh Maleszewski, Volodymyr Khomenko, Sebastian Laiseca, Chase, Michael Slade, Scarlet Barton, Matthew Gill, Aaron, Alexander Heavens, Alexander Ahn, Arrngrim, Fluffy19, Adam Primaeros, Jan Schmid, Sara Shah, Gard Fredrik Skuland, Veselin Kostadinov, Jonathan Velazquez Gore, Daniel, Philly Cashion, Seona Tea, Clayton Fussell, Daniel Gonzalez, Stephen Joseph DCruz, Morten, Dan Q, Thomas Lee, Finn Edwards, David Taylor, Corbin, Fabricio Godoy, Charles Kuang, Alan Feyaerts, Maximilian Ritter, Jesse MacLean, Matt Collins, Yousif, Jesse Powell, Dan Treasure, nga⁴, 冠瑋 陳, Wei Wong, Praveen Muthu, Jon Davis, Bahjat, Mike Mintz, Jem Arnold, Steffen Weng, Igor Benicio de Mesquita, Lars Vas Dias, Greeny Liu, Tibor Schiemann, dante harper, Bünyamin Tetik, Eli Fisker, Joe Pond, Jørgen Smalås, Gustavo, Tommi Mansikka, Dario Wünsch, Matthew Macomber, Daniel McCouid-Carr, Neelfyn, Muath, Edgar Duarte Ortega, Stephen Chen, Alipasha Sadri, Kevin P, Steven Ratner, Theo Alves Monteiro, Brucelow, José, Tony Montuori, Philipp Weber, Brad Wardell, David Davenport-Firth, Alexander Scheffer, Eric, Austin, Enrico, Hamad, Andrew Connor, Ignacio Flores, Tom Langford, Vaelohs, Peter Schuller, Bear, Brandy Alexander, Mark Govea, Alexander Kosenkov, Eric, Wesley Sheridan Montgomery, Artem Anchugov, Brandon Liu, Erven, varinder singh bal, Scott Laing, Philip Freeman, Gizem Gürkan, George Chearswat, Tim, Victor, Martin Fink-Jensen, Josh Allen, oscar gautama, Karl Snickars, Jennifer Hiller, Bruno Araújo, Maarten Bremer, Daniel OCL, Carlos Bohorquez, Elchus, RobPT, Hugo, Lethargicpanda, Amdrew, Minghan Ko, Mark Scheurwater, David Harbinson, Rikard Nyberg, Collin Banko, Florian Guitton, Jezariael Demos, Ajay Shekhar,  Nick Yonge, Jon Moroney, Eugene Cham, Renaud Savignard, James, Viktor Asklund, Ryan, somersault18:24, Ben Shackman, Pranab Shenoy, Terry Lipstein, Tim Carll, Javier de la Garza, Rory Bennett, Jan Berdel, Sieglinde Geisel, Jeff Churchill 3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Awesome! Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
I've studied nuclear war for 35 years -- you should be worried. | Brian Toon | TEDxMileHigh
 
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For the first time in decades, it's hard to ignore the threat of nuclear war. But as long as you're far from the blast, you're safe, right? Wrong. In this sobering talk, atmospheric scientist Brian Toon explains how even a small nuclear war could destroy all life on earth -- and what we can do to prevent it. A professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Colorado-Boulder, Brian Toon investigates the causes of the ozone hole, how volcanic eruptions alter the climate, how ancient Mars had flowing rivers, and the environmental impacts of nuclear war. He contributed to the U.N.’s Nobel Peace Prize for climate change and holds numerous scientific awards, including two NASA medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. He is an avid woodworker. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 1438307 TEDx Talks
Uranium; the real costs of nuclear power
 
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Roger Moody is interviewed in this film about uranium mining ahead of a talk he gave in Stroud organised by Stroud District Green Party. Roger is Features Editor at Mines and Communities. More info at: http://www.minesandcommunities.org/ See also recent talk in Stroud about nuclear waste: http://stroudcommunity.tv/the-future-of-radioactive-waste-and-nuclear-safety-in-gloucestershire/ Amongst his publications are: "Rocks and Hard Places : The Globalization of Mining". The world of international mining is changing rapidly. Mineral consumption is outstripping the capabilities of both communities and fragile ecosystems to cope with bigger and bigger mines. Moody shows that mining can impact severely on local communities, ways of life and the environment. This key book concludes with urgent proposals to control multinationals in a sector that is at the core of resource exploitation. "The Gulliver File: Uranium Mining Industry [Hardcover]". This is a study of the world of mining - a book born from the experience of numerous environmental, anti-nuclear and indigenous groups, concerned about the negative impact of huge mineral mining projects. The book has profiles of more than 650 companies worldwide, including full details of their ultimate ownership and their subsidiaries and detailed information on hundreds of mining prospects - along with full accounts of resistance to them. More about Stroud District Green Party at: http://www.stroudgreenparty.org.uk/
Views: 79 Philip Booth
A microscopic look at why the world is running out of sand
 
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Humans are using more sand than the Earth is naturally producing, and that’s a problem for the global construction industry. But it turns out that the usefulness of sand depends on the science of each tiny little grain. We went on a sand scavenger hunt to collect some samples, look at them under a microscope, and try to figure out why sand scarcity is such a problem. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs
Views: 955830 Verge Science
Mining Tellurium (Te) and selenium (Se) for solar panels - University of Leicester
 
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www.le.ac.uk https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/geology/research/vtmrg/tease A shift from fossil fuels to low-CO2 technologies will lead to greater consumption of certain essential raw materials. Tellurium (Te) and selenium (Se) are 'E-tech' elements essential in photovoltaic (PV) solar panels. They are rare and mined only in small quantities; their location within the Earth is poorly known; recovering them is technically and economically challenging; and their recovery and recycling has significant environmental impacts. Yet demand is expected to surge and PV film production will consume most Se mined and outstrip Te supply by 2020. Presently, these elements are available only as by-products of Cu and Ni refining and their recovery from these ores is decreasing, leading to a supply risk that could hamper the roll-out of PV. Meeting future demand requires new approaches, including a change from by-production to targeted processing of Se and Te-rich ores. Our research aims to tackle the security of supply by understanding the processes that govern how and where these elements are concentrated in the Earth's crust; and by enabling their recovery with minimal environmental and economic cost. This will involve 20 industrial partners from explorers, producers, processors, end-users and academia, contributing over £0.5M. Focussed objectives across 6 environments will target key knowledge gaps: The magmatic environment: Develop methods for accurately measuring Se and Te in minerals and rocks - they typically occur in very low concentrations and research is hampered by the lack of reliable data. Experimentally determine how Te and Se distribute between sulfide liquids and magmas - needed to predict where they occur - and ground-truth these data using well-understood magmatic systems. Assess the recognised, but poorly understood, role of "alkaline" magmas in hydrothermal Te mineralisation. The hydrothermal environment: Measure preferences of Te and Se for different minerals to predict mineral hosts and design ore process strategies. Model water-rock reaction in "alkaline" magma-related hydrothermal systems to test whether the known association is controlled by water chemistry. The critical zone environment: Determine the chemical forms and distributions of Te and Se in the weathering environment to understand solubility, mobility and bioavailability. This in turn controls the geochemical halo for exploration and provides a natural analogue for microbiological extraction. The sedimentary environment: Identify the geological and microbiological controls on the occurrence, mobility and concentration of Se and Te in coal - a possible major repository of Se. Identify the geological and microbiological mechanisms of Se and Te concentration in oxidised and reduced sediments - and evaluate these mechanisms as potential industrial separation processes. Microbiological processing: Identify efficient Se- and Te-precipitating micro-organisms and optimise conditions for recovery from solution. Assess the potential to bio-recover Se and Te from ores and leachates and design a bioreactor. Ionic liquid processing: Assess the ability of ionic solvents to dissolve Se and Te ore minerals as a recovery method. Optimise ionic liquid processing and give a pilot-plant demonstration. This is the first holistic study of the Te and Se cycle through the Earth's crust, integrated with groundbreaking oreprocessing research. Our results will be used by industry to: efficiently explore for new Te and Se deposits; adapt processing techniques to recover Te and Se from existing deposits; use new low-energy, low-environmental impact recovery technologies. Our results will be used by national agencies to improve estimates of future Te and Se supplies to end-users, who will benefit from increased confidence in security of supply, and to international government for planning future energy strategies. The public will benefit through unhindered development of sustainable environmental technologies to support a low-CO2 society. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester in 2017. Filmed & Edited by Hayley Evans Produced by Ellen Rudge and Dan Smith
Fracking explained: opportunity or danger
 
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Fracking explained in five minutes. Fracking is a controversial topic. On the one side the gas drilling companies, on the other citizen opposed to this drilling method. Politicians are also divided on the matter. We try to take a neutral look on fracking. It is relevant for all of us, because of high prices for energy and the danger for our drinking water. This video focuses mostly on the debate currently ongoing in europe. In a lot of european countries there is a public outcry against fracking, espacially in germany. But the facts in this video are relevant to all of us. Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://www.behance.net/kurzgesagt Fracking explained: opportunity or danger Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Can We Launch Nuclear Waste Into the Sun? Why This is a Terrible Idea
 
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We've got all this nuclear waste to dispose of, and we've got this superheated fusion ball in the sky. Couldn't we just blast our nuclear waste into the Sun and be done with it? Support us at: http://www.patreon.com/universetoday More stories at: http://www.universetoday.com/ Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universetoday Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+universetoday/ Instagram - http://instagram.com/universetoday Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / [email protected] Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - [email protected] When I look at the Sun, I don’t see a warm life-giving orb, nourishing all living creatures here on Earth. No, I see that fiery ball as a cosmic garbage compactor. A place I can dump all my household garbage, to make room for new impulse purchases. I mean, the Sun is right there, not doing anything right? It’s hotter than any garbage incinerator, and it’s the gravitational well at the heart of the Solar System. Get me a rocket, let’s blast that waste into oblivion. Okay, I suspect it’s going to get expensive, so let’s just start with the worst garbage on Earth: nuclear waste. You know, the byproduct of nuclear reactors that generate electricity for many parts of the world. This stuff is highly toxic and it’s going to be around for hundreds of thousands of years. It’s also pretty dense, maybe it does make sense to get this stuff off Earth and into the Sun? Let’s run the numbers. Nuclear waste, or radioactive waste, of course, is anything leftover material that still has radioactivity. For the most part, we get this as the leftover material from nuclear power reactors, but it’s also generated by hospitals, and nuclear weapons manufacturing. We’ve got leftover nuclear waste from uranium mining, radium processing, and various civil and military research projects. For example, when you mine uranium from the ground, you get leftover radium and radioactive rock, soil, and even the water. When you power a nuclear reactor, the spent fuel rods are still highly radioactive and dangerous. In the United States alone, there are hundreds of different sites which are heavily contaminated, over thousands of acres. According to the World Nuclear Association, OPEC nations generate 300 million tonnes of toxic waste every year. We’re talking about poisonous chemicals, medical waste, coal dust. Really anything that you don’t want anywhere near you, or inside you. Just to give you a sense of scale, that’s a cube of toxic poisons nearly a kilometer to a side, assuming the stuff is a little more dense than water. Out of this, only 97,000 tonnes of nuclear waste is generated across the planet every year. This is radioactive wastes of all types. That’s only .03% of all the toxic waste. But for the purpose of our calculations, I’m going to zero in on the most toxic, most radioactive material we’re dealing with: the high-level waste produced by nuclear reactors. Now we’re merely talking about 12,000 tonnes per year, or 12% of the nuclear waste showing up on our planet every year. Now, let’s look at launch costs. Most rocket companies are going to charge you $10,000 to $20,000 per kilogram to blast a payload into Low Earth Orbit. The best deal on the market right now is SpaceX at around $4,000 USD per kilogram. And if they get the Falcon Heavy flying this year, it could bring the price down to around $2,500 per kilogram. If all we wanted to do was blast all this waste into Low Earth Orbit, the calculations are pretty simple. 12,000 tonnes is 12 million kilograms. Multiply that by $2,500 per kilogram, and you get 30 billion dollars. You’re looking at 240 Falcon Heavy launches per year. Almost a launch every single day carrying a payload of high-level nuclear waste. Out of sight, out of mind. That’s a lot of money, but in theory, the world could afford it if they wanted to stop having wars, or something. If they wanted to blast off all the nuclear waste, it would be more like 250 billion. Again. An incomprehensible amount of money, but still within the realm of possibility, assuming that SpaceX gets the Falcon Heavy launching, lofting payloads of nuclear waste 50 tonnes at a time. But this is Low Earth Orbit, and we don’t want to go there. Anything in LEO still experiences friction from the Earth’s atmosphere, and eventually it’s going to return back to Earth. Imagine regular meteor showers of highly radioactive plutonium. That would be bad. It would be more safer to launch this stuff into Geostationary Orbit, where the television satellites are broadcasting from. Material in this orbit can be expected to hang around for a long long time. You’re looking at twice the price to blast off to GEO, so go ahead and double your costs to put that stuff safely out into space. 60 billion dollars for high-level waste. 500 billion for all the nuclear waste.
Views: 351754 Fraser Cain
The Earth Is Running Out of Sand and It Could Cause a Global Crisis
 
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Much of the world’s construction is reliant on sand, and we’re running out of it. What could that mean next? Skyscrapers of the Future Will Be Engineered to Copy Nature - https://youtu.be/-OPGQ9EhDZM Read More: Construction: limit China's sand mining https://www.nature.com/articles/550457c “Sand mining in China has been massively stepped up over several decades to make the concrete and cement needed for the country's boom in urbanization infrastructure. The scale of this activity in the Yangtze River basin, for example, has destroyed crucial spawning, feeding and rearing grounds for its aquatic organisms, contributing to the demise of unique species.” Why there is a shortage of sand https://www.economist.com/the-economist-explains/2017/04/24/why-there-is-a-shortage-of-sand “Sand is in high demand. In some parts of the world, people are going to increasingly great lengths to get their hands on the golden grains. A ‘sand mafia’ in India intimidates locals in order to extract and transport the material.” Sand mining: the global environmental crisis you’ve probably never heard of https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/feb/27/sand-mining-global-environmental-crisis-never-heard “The global urbanisation boom is devouring colossal amounts of sand – the key ingredient of concrete and asphalt. Shanghai, China’s financial centre, has exploded in the last 20 years. The city has added 7 million new residents since 2000, raising its population to more than 23 million.” ____________________ Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested on all the compelling, innovative and groundbreaking science happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond. Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Elements on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/SeekerElements/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com Special thanks to Amy Shira Teitel for hosting and writing this episode of Seeker! Check Amy out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/astVintageSpace
Views: 189342 Seeker
Congressional Testimony on Mining Reform
 
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Oversight Hearing on Hardrock Mining on Federal Land. Environmental Working Group analyst Dusty Horwitt explains to the Energy and Natural Resources Committee how national treasures like the Grand Canyon are threatened by uranium mining claims. More information and maps are available at www.ewg.org/miningmaps.
The Collapse of Coal
 
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American coal is in crisis. Production is down. Mining companies have declared bankruptcy. So how did America's coal industry get in this situation? And what will happen to America's coal communities? Inside Energy and The Allegheny Front teamed up to look at the collapse of coal.
Views: 33737 Inside Energy
20 year Proposed Withdrawal of new Uranium Exploration and Mining on the Arizona Strip
 
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Last month secretary of the interior Ken Salazar announced a 6 month emergency withdrawal of new hard-rock mining claims on the Arizona Strip. This is an extension to the two year segregation that was set to expire on July 21st. The BLM is currently responding to comments on the draft EIS (Environmental Impact Statement) and finalizing the Final EIS to turn over to the Secretary of the interior to make the final decision. Malia Bascom investigates the pros and cons of Uranium Mining on the Arizona Strip. What would a 20 year withdrawal from future uranium mining claims mean to the economies of Southern Utah Counties Like Kane, Garfield, San Juan, and Washington? What are the concerns of Mohave and Coconino County in Arizona where the mining would take place?
Views: 52 The County Seat
The Legacy of Uranium Mine Waste in Elliot Lake (3of3)
 
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Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste? (released in Sept 1994) Part 3 of 3 This documentary examines the environmental impact of the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada
Views: 1126 Arthur YUL
The Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor:  What Fusion Wanted To Be
 
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Google Tech Talks November 18, 2008 ABSTRACT Electrical power is, and will increasingly become, the desired form of energy for its convenience, safety, flexibility and applicability. Even future transportation embraces electric cars, trains, and chemical fuel production (jet fuel, hydrogen, etc.) based upon an abundant electrical supply. Although existing energy sources can and should be expanded where practical, no one source has shown to be practical to rapidly fulfill the world's energy requirements effectively. Presently there is an existing source of energy ideally suited to electrical energy production that is not being exploited anywhere in the world today, although its existence and practicality has been know since the earliest days of nuclear science. Thorium is the third source of fission energy and the LFTR is the idealized mechanism to turn this resource into electrical energy. Enough safe, clean energy, globally sustainable for 1000's of years at US standards. This talk is aimed at explaining this thorium energy resource from fundamental physics to today's practical applications. The presentation is sufficient for the non-scientist to grasp the whole subject, but will be intriguing to even classically trained nuclear engineers. By providing the historical context in which the technology was discovered and later developed into a power reactor, the story of thorium's disappearance as an energy source is revealed. But times have changed, and today, thorium energy can be safely exploited in a completely new form of nuclear reactor. The LFTR is unique, having a hot liquid core thus eliminating fuel fabrication costs and the need for a large reactor. It cannot have a nuclear meltdown and is so safe that typical control rods are not required at all. This design topples all the conventional arguments against conventional energy sources in such areas as: * Waste Production * Safety * Proliferation * Capital Costs and Location * Environmental Impact * Social Acceptance * Flexibility * Grid Infrastructure * Efficiency Should America take this step toward a New Era in Nuclear Energy Production? Hear the case for "The Electricity Rock" and then decide. Speaker: Dr. Joe Bonometti Dr. Bonometti has extensive engineering experience in the government, within industry, and in academia over a 25-year career. Recently completing an assignment as the NASA Chair Professor at the Naval Post graduate School, he supported a ship design study that utilized advanced nuclear power derived from thorium. Working at NASA for ten years as a technology manager, lead systems engineer, nuclear specialist, and propulsion researcher, he lead several NASA tiger teams in evaluating the Nuclear System Initiatives fission demonstration vehicle and missions. He managed the Emerging Propulsion Technology Area for in-space systems, the Marshall Air Launch team, as well as a variety of other power and propulsion assignments and is now the Lead Systems Engineer for the Ares I-Y flight. After earning a Doctorate degree in Mechanical Engineering from University of Alabama in Huntsville, he spent several years as a Research Scientist & Senior Research Engineer at the UAH Propulsion Research Center where he served as a Principal Investigator and manager for the Solar Thermal Laboratory. He has worked as a Senior Mechanical Designer at Pratt & Whitney supporting aircraft engine manufacturing and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory within the laser fusion program. A graduate from the United States Military Academy, at West Point, where he studied nuclear physics and engineering, Dr. Bonometti served as an officer in the United States Army Corps of Engineers; both in combat and district engineering management assignments. He is a Registered Professional Engineer in the State of Virginia, and has authored numerous aerospace technical publications, particularly propulsion and space systems technologies. His technical expertise includes nuclear engineering, specialized mechanical & materials research, space plasmas & propulsion, thermodynamics, heat transfer, and space systems engineering. This Google Tech Talk was hosted by Boris Debic.
Views: 340983 GoogleTechTalks
The Legacy of Uranium Mine Waste in Elliot Lake (1of3)
 
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Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste? (released in Sept 1994) Part 1 of 3 This documentary examines the environmental impact of the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada
Views: 3832 Arthur YUL
The Human and Environmental Costs of our Hunger for Coal: Antrim Caskey at TEDxMidAtlantic 2012
 
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Laura Antrim Caskey is an award-winning independent photojournalist based in Rock Creek, West Virginia. Caskey is known for her work Dragline, a self-published photojournalistic exposé, designed to educate and activate, on the human and environmental costs of mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia, to which she has dedicated years of work. Her photographs have been published in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Boston Globe, Smithsonian, Nature; featured in documentary films including The Last Mountain; and currently on exhibit in "One Earth," at Fovea in Beacon, NY. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 4738 TEDx Talks
South Africa's Toxic Mine Dumps (2009)
 
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Superdump: Toxic waste seeps into the environment from South African mine dumps. December 2009 For downloads and more information visit: http://journeyman.tv/59894/documentary-films-archive/superdump.html After 120 years of gold mining, the land and water on Gautengs far West Rand are some of the most polluted in the country. The mine dumps that dot the area west of Johannesburg have been identified as public health risks. One of the biggest problems is uranium seeping into the watercourses, turning the sediment both poisonous and radioactive. Ecologists, the community and the mines all agree that the mine dumps must go. But no-one can agree what to do with them. This edition of Special Assignment takes a look at community resistance against two proposals to reprocess the mine dumps and relocate the resulting waste. Communities are clashing with the mines over two proposed superdumps mega-mine dumps proposed for Fochville and Randfontein. Should these communities suffer for the health of the entire region? And what impact will these superdumps have on food security? SABC - Ref. 4564 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 4681 Journeyman Pictures
The Legacy of Uranium Mine Waste in Elliot Lake  (2of3)
 
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Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste? (released in Sept 1994) Part 2 of 3 This documentary examines the environmental impact of the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada
Views: 1151 Arthur YUL
Uranium in Saskatchewan The Underground Story wmv
 
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This is an educational video with no sound...to inform people about the action to stop Nuclear waste from being dumped in Saskatchewan. Please use it to present the information that is buried deep within the documents, and that is hidden from the public while the business, politicians and industry serve themselves. We are stewards of MOTHER EARTH...we are here to protect this SACRED Earth for Future Generations! Thanks to all of the dedicated people and organizations that are committed to protecting, and creating a SAFE, CLEAN environment with green EARTH friendly energy sources!
Operation Plowshare: "Project Dugout" 1964 Lawrence Radiation Laboratory AEC
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ Project Dugout was part of Operation Plowshare, testing to see if nuclear explosions could be used for excavation purposes in civil engineering construction. The blasts shown at the Nevada Test Site are of conventional explosives, trials prior to testing with atomic weapons (Buggy , 12 March 1968, and Schooner, 8 December 1968). 'Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Technical Film Report, part-animated... Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. (.pdf doc) http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA396282 ...Project Dugout was a chemical row-charge cratering experiment in hard rock executed as part of the Plowshare Program for development of nuclear excavation. The purpose of the experiment was to develop a more complete understanding of the fundamental processes involved in row charge cratering. Dugout was fired June 24, 1964, at approximately 0806 Pacific Daylight Time or 1506 Greenwich Mean Time. Five separately placed (20 ± 1.5)-ton charges were fired simultaneously. The liquid nitromethane explosive was contained in five mined spherical cavities approximately 10.3 feet in diameter. The centers of the cavities were at a depth of 58.8 ±0.2 feet, and they were spaced 45 feet apart horizontally... http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Plowshare Project Plowshare was the overall United States term for the development of techniques to use nuclear explosives for peaceful construction purposes... It was the US portion of what are called Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE). Despite successfully demonstrating non-combat uses for nuclear explosives, (i.e., for rock blasting and stimulation of tight gas), negative impacts from Project Plowshare's 27 nuclear projects led to the program's termination in 1977, due in large part to public opposition. These consequences included tritium-contaminated water and the deposition of fallout from radioactive material being injected into the atmosphere, which led to an increase in environmental levels of radioactivity across the United States... One of the first plowshare nuclear blast cratering proposals that came close to being carried out was Project Chariot, which would have used several hydrogen bombs to create an artificial harbor at Cape Thompson, Alaska. It was never carried out due to concerns for the native populations and the fact that there was little potential use for the harbor to justify its risk and expense. A number of proof-of-concept cratering blasts were conducted; including the Buggy shot of 5 1-Kt-devices for a channel/trench in Area 21 and the largest being 104 kiloton (435 terajoule) on July 6, 1962 at the north end of Yucca Flats, within the Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada... Citizen groups voiced concerns and opposition to some of the Plowshare tests. There were concerns that the blast effects from the Schooner explosion could dry up active wells or trigger an earthquake...
Views: 13901 Jeff Quitney
Olympic Dam mine expansion- Environmental impacts of tailings & water by Dr Gavin Mudd - Pt 1
 
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http://cuttlefishcountry.com BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam mine is massive and destined to become the biggest open cut mine in the world. Naturally, with massive mines come massive impacts... environmentally, socially and economically. Widely published environmental engineer Dr Gavin Mudd (Monash University) gives this presentation on the impact the mining operation will have from the desert to the sea, and beyond through the export of dangerous radioactive materials. Tailings dams will leak radioactive waste into the earth in the South Australian desert, the water drawn from the Great Artesian Basin will continue to dry natural mound springs, threaten pastoral and agricultural bores and endanger arid zone ecology and indigenous sacred sites. Dr Gavin Mudd delivered this presentation in Adelaide, South Australia on October 9th, 2011... the day before the mega-mine project received environmental approval from both State and Federal Governments. You can find out more at http://cuttlefishcountry.com
Views: 1246 danimations
11 Things Found After Japanese Tsunami
 
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Some of the craziest things will wash up after a big storm like an entire yacht on top of a building and soccer ball across the country! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 6. A Japanese Dock This piece of debris happened to be part of a Japanese dock that was torn from its moorings during the tsunami and washed up on the shores of Oregon and brought back what researchers believe to be about 100 tons of sea life. Scientists from the Oregon State University state that the 66-foot-long deck has around 13 pounds of organisms per square foot. The dock did not show any signs of radiation from the Fukushima nuclear plant meltdown caused by the tsunami, but it did pose the threat of carrying invasive species. What that means is that these creatures that aren’t natives to the area could potentially throw the local ecosystems out of whack and cause irreparable damage to the native wildlife, such as the dread zebra mussel. 5. A Mystery Creature There have been some unusual things that have washed up on random shores after tsunamis, this being one of them. After the 2011 tsunami hit, this giant white mass had been washed out onto the shore of Japan and had many of the locals, along with everyone who watched this video on YouTube, wondering what it even was? Some thought it to be a brand new creature that had risen from the dark depths of the ocean floor while others speculated it was merely a large rock or boulder. Don’t worry, officials have concluded that this isn’t some new species that’s going to wipe us out. They simply stated that it’s most likely just a mass of whale blubber from the carcass of a dead whale that’s pretty much unrecognizable. 4. A Shipping Tote Back in November of 2014, this shipping tote had washed up near the shores of Seal Rock in Oregon. This 4-by-5 foot plastic shipping tote had been floating out at sea for the last 3 years since the tsunami struck and amassed around 200 blue mussels that were attached to it. Like the dock that was found in 2012, this tote was a potential host for carrying invasive species and scientist eventually determined it as a non-threat to the surrounding environment. Still, the amount of debris, the total estimated to be around 18.11 million tons with 70 percent of the debris sinking to the bottom of the ocean, is still rather high and is still washing up years after that tragic event took place. 3. Various Trash A barge from the fishing town of Ucluelet in British Columbia had carried in around “super sacks” of debris caused by the tsunami. Those sacks are designed to hold up to 1,000 pounds, so you can only imagine how heavy all that weight could possibly be. Ever since the tsunami struck, there have been volunteer pickups in the town where local and Japanese students have gotten involved. They’ve managed to collect all different sorts of garbage such as styrofoam, pieces of Japanese houses, and other debris. Though they’ve made progress, their results haven’t been achieved through smooth sailing. The coastline of Ucluelet is described as remote and rugged which made the cleanups very difficult and the fact that there was already debris unrelated to the tsunami already there makes for even more trash than expected. 2. An Entire Ship This yacht happened to be discovered in the Iwate Prefecture in Northeastern Japan in the town of Otsuchi nearly two months after the tsunami had hit. The ship weighs in at an incredible 200 tons and it’s a huge surprise that the two-story building that is supporting all that weight is still somehow managing to keep from collapsing. It’s hard to even process the amount of force needed to lift the ship. 1. A House As one of the most powerful and deadly disasters that can occur in nature, the tsunami is one that leaves devastation in its wake. Their sheer force can only be imagined by those who have never witnessed what it can be capable of at first hand and even then you can never come close to doing it justice. Take for example this house that was a part of the Fukushima debris. This was someone’s entire home where they built a life for themselves around it and in a matter of moments, it was swept off its foundation and carried out into the sea, along with what is estimated to be another 200,000 buildings.
Views: 15894434 Talltanic
Olympic Dam mine expansion- Environmental impacts of tailings & water by Dr Gavin Mudd - Pt 3
 
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http://cuttlefishcountry.com BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam mine is massive and destined to become the biggest open cut mine in the world. Naturally, with massive mines come massive impacts... environmentally, socially and economically. Widely published environmental engineer Dr Gavin Mudd (Monash University) gives this presentation on the impact the mining operation will have from the desert to the sea, and beyond through the export of dangerous radioactive materials. Tailings dams will leak radioactive waste into the earth in the South Australian desert, the water drawn from the Great Artesian Basin will continue to dry natural mound springs, threaten pastoral and agricultural bores and endanger arid zone ecology and indigenous sacred sites. Dr Gavin Mudd delivered this presentation in Adelaide, South Australia on October 9th, 2011... the day before the mega-mine project received environmental approval from both State and Federal Governments. You can find out more at http://cuttlefishcountry.com
Views: 564 danimations
Could We Marsiform Ourselves? Using Genetic Engineering To Live on Other Worlds
 
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Changing another world to support Earth life is called terraforming. But maybe it's a better idea to just change Earth life to live on other worlds. Support us at: http://www.patreon.com/universetoday More stories at: http://www.universetoday.com/ Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Follow us on Tumblr: http://universetoday.tumblr.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universetoday Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+universetoday/ Instagram - http://instagram.com/universetoday Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / [email protected] Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - [email protected] As soon as people learn how inhospitable Mars, Venus, and really the entire Solar System are, they want to know how we can fix it. There’s a word for fixing a planet to make it more like Earth: terraforming. If you want to fix Mars, all you have to do is thicken and warm up its atmosphere to the point that Earth life could survive. You’d need to do the opposite with Venus, cooling it down and reducing the atmospheric pressure. But it’s hard to wrap your brain around the scale it would take to do such a thing. We’re talking about an incomprehensible amount of atmosphere to try and modify. The atmospheric pressure on the surface of Venus is 90 times the pressure of Earth. It’s carbon dioxide, so you need some chemical, like magnesium or calcium to lock it away. If you can mine, for example, 4 times the mass of asteroid Vesta, it should be possible. No, from our perspective, that’s practically impossible. In fact, it’s kind of ironic, when you consider the fact that we’re making our own planet less habitable to human civilization every day. There’s another path to making another world habitable, however, and that’s changing life itself to be more adaptable to surviving on another world. Instead of terraforming a planet, what if we terraformed ourselves? Actually, that’s a really bad term. We’d really be changing ourselves to be better adapted to living on Mars. So we’d be Marsiforming ourselves? Venisfying ourselves? Okay, I’ll need to work on the terminology. But you get the gist. Life, of course, has been evolving and adapting on Earth for at least 4.1 billion years. Pretty much as soon as life could arise on Earth, it did. And those early lifeforms went on to modify and change, adapting to every environment on our planet, from the deepest oceans, to the mountains. From the deserts to the icy tundra. But in the last few thousand years, we’ve taken a driving role in the evolution of life for the domesticated plants and animals we eat and care for. Your pet dog looks vastly different from the wolf ancestor it evolved from. We’ve increased the yield of corn and wheat, adapted fruit and vegetables, and turned chickens into flightless mobile breast meat. And in the last few decades, we’ve gained the most powerful new tools for adapting life to our needs: genetic modification. Instead of waiting for evolution and selective breeding to get the results we need, we can rewrite the genetic code of lifeforms, borrowing beneficial traits from life over here, and jamming it into the code of life over there. What doesn’t get cooler when it glows in the dark? Nothing, that’s what. Can we adapt Earth life to live on Mars? It turns out, our toughest life isn’t that far off. During the American Society for Microbiology meeting in 2015, researchers presented how well tough bacteria would be able to handle the conditions on Mars. They found that 4 species of methanogens might actually be able to survive below the surface, consuming hydrogen and carbon dioxide and releasing methane. In other words, under the right conditions, there are forms of Earth life that can survive on Mars right now. In fact, as we continue to explore Mars, and learn that it’s wetter than we ever thought, we risk infecting the planet with our own microbial life accidentally. But when we imagine life on Mars, we’re not thinking about a few hardy methanogens, struggling for life beneath the briny regolith. No, we imagine plants, trees, and little animals scurrying about. Do we have anything close there that we could adapt? It turns out there are strains of lichen, the symbiosis of fungi and algae that could stand a chance. You’ve probably seen lichen on rocks and other places that suck for any other lifeform. But according to Jean-Pierre de Vera, with the German Aerospace Center’s Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin, Germany, there are Earth-based lichen which are tough enough. They put lichen into a test environment that simulated the surface of Mars: low atmospheric pressure, carbon dioxide atmosphere, freezing cold temperatures and high radiation. The only things they couldn’t simulate were galactic radiation and low gravity. In the harshest conditions, the lichen was barely able to hang on and survive, but in milder Mars conditions, protected within rock cracks, the lichen continued to carry out its regular photosynthesis.
Views: 15409 Fraser Cain
Should Google Go Nuclear? Clean, cheap, nuclear power...
 
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Google Tech Talks November 9, 2006 ABSTRACT This is not your father's fusion reactor! Forget everything you know about conventional thinking on nuclear fusion: high-temperature plasmas, steam turbines, neutron radiation and even nuclear waste are a thing of the past. Goodbye thermonuclear fusion; hello inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IEC), an old idea that's been made new. While the international community debates the fate of the politically-turmoiled $12 billion ITER (an experimental thermonuclear reactor), simple IEC reactors are being built as high-school science fair projects. Dr. Robert Bussard, former Asst. Director of the Atomic Energy Commission and founder of Energy Matter...
Views: 68897 GoogleTechTalks
THORIUM DEBUNK
 
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Thorium, element 90 on the periodic table, is a fertile material. When struck by a neutron, it will change (over time) into Uranium-233. Uranium-233 is fissile, and can fission into energy and fission products. Claims have been made regarding both thorium's energy potential, and counter claims that it holds no particular advantage over uranium as a nuclear fuel. This video seeks to clarify this dispute. Music in this video was created by KiloWatts: http://KiloWattsMusic.com/ Video assets were remixed from http://ThoriumRemix.com/ ,with some video excerpts from COSMOS with Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson. Video constructed by Gordon McDowell. Reports cited are... NNL [UK's National Nuclear Laboratory] Comparison of Thorium and Uranium Fuel Cycles: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/65504/6300-comparison-fuel-cycles.pdf OECD NEA's Introduction of Thorium In The Nuclear Fuel Cycle: https://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2015/7224-thorium.pdf IEER Thorium Fact Sheet: http://energyfromthorium.com/ieer-rebuttal/ (I will not be linking to IEER. Easy to Google.) For a multi-hour in-depth look at Thorium, see video "Thorium.": https://youtu.be/2oK6Rs6yFsM
Views: 381611 gordonmcdowell
Thorium 2017
 
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Thorium is an abundant material currently disposed of as waste. It is found in coal ash piles and mine tailings. A single Rare Earths mine could produce enough Thorium byproduct to power the entire planet. To do so requires a very different nuclear reactor than the kinds we use today. Not one that uses solid fuel rods, but a reactor in which the fuel is kept in a liquid state. Not one that uses pressurized water as a coolant, but a reactor that uses extremely stable molten salts. The full description of one such reactor is: 2-Fluid, Thermal-Spectrum, Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor equipped with a chemical fuel salt treatment module. Such a reactor was conceived of decades ago, as documented in the book "Fluid Fuel Reactors" [1958]. Or, simply "LFTR" (Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor) as proposed by Flibe Energy's Kirk Sorensen... a modern redesign of the 2-Fluid, thermal-spectrum, MSBR concept. http://Flibe-Energy.com/ Since 2011 (the year Flibe Energy was founded), legislators asking questions about Thorium have had their queries answered as if such a reactor design did not exist. NNL [UK] and OECD [NEA] reports on the Thorium Fuel Cycle did not explore the implications of this reactor, and dismiss thorium based on challenges and mediocre performance found in other reactor designs. For example, other options include a "Fast-Spectrum Molten-Salt Reactor". Worth pursuing, certainly, but requires more fissile inventory than LFTR... approximately 5x as much. (Fissile inventory is specifically mentioned as a concern by OECD's thorium report.) And assuming the challenges of a fast-spectrum MSR can be met... both natural Uranium and natural Thorium can both be fully consumed as fuel in a fast-spectrum reactor. That is where Thorium is dismissed as only "4x as common as Uranium" (fast-spectrum usage) rather than "400x as common as U-235" (thermal-spectrum usage). Thorium's advantages: both thermal-spectrum breeding and unique chemical properties, are taken full advantage of only by LFTR style reactors. When evaluated in any other reactor, depending on that reactor, Uranium can be as attractive, more attractive, or Uranium can be the only viable option. For example: Shippingport. Cited as an example of a "Thorium Reactor" by Dr. Lyons, it was NEVER intended to be economical, and features no advantages of LFTR. It was a solid-fuel reactor, and so operated at low-temperature, had no on-line chemical reprocessing, used high-pressure water coolant, used fuel as inefficiently as every other solid-fuel reactor, and had to be shut down every time it was refueled. 2 of its 3 fuel loads were Enriched Uranium. It was -a- Reactor capable of consuming Thorium and demonstrated only that it was possible... it was not -THE- Thorium Reactor. If you'd like to watch a mini-series length (6.5h) documentary on this topic, please check out "Thorium." https://youtu.be/2oK6Rs6yFsM ...it goes into some technical detail on Thorium and Molten Salt Reactors, as well as nuclear power itself. This video exists thanks to support pledged via Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thorium Other videos I've edited on Thorium & Molten Salt Reactors can be found here: http://ThoriumRemix.com/ Music (at 28:29) created by Kilowatts: http://kilowattsmusic.com/ 00:00 LWR: 0.05% of Uranium's Energy Potential 00:54 LWR: Chemical Instability 01:38 LWR: High Pressure 02:48 Alvin Weinberg 03:05 High Temperature not High Pressure 03:40 MSRE Achievement 03:51 Graphite 04:08 Move Heat No Pressure 04:45 Salt: Ionic Bonds 05:33 Fluoride vs Fluorine 06:16 Cesium & Iodine 06:33 Drain Tank 07:53 Disperse Heat 08:36 Solid Fuel: Candles 09:24 Online Chemical Reprocessing 10:15 Legislators ask about Thorium 10:46 OECD NEA Thorium Report 11:23 Fast-Spectrum Dodge 12:08 Spent Fuel 12:34 Efficient 13:49 Concentrated 14:10 Rare Earth Elements 15:41 China's Academy of Science 16:34 CO2 Raw Material 17:07 Recycling 18:05 Sorting 18:52 NASA, Recycling & Energy 20:57 Molten Salt Research Halted 21:28 World Set Free 21:55 Documents 22:28 CD-ROMs and Internet 23:15 Obama Administration 24:33 Regulations vs Liquid Fuel 25:12 Stymied in USA 26:08 Flibe Energy 26:41 MSRE Researchers 27:14 Export of MSR Expertise 27:41 China vs Global Warming 28:29 1969-2017 Timeline 33:08 Thousands of years of Slavery 33:32 Energy Density of Thorium Other Video Sources 02:46 https://youtu.be/EviEN0ScOwg Pandora's Box 03:08 https://youtu.be/ofs6-K7UCSU Weinberg 2011 03:41 https://youtu.be/pGzKuhY50v4 Weinberg 2004 03:41 https://youtu.be/tyDbq5HRs0o Found MSRE Doc 05:34 https://youtu.be/vtWp45Eewtw Fluorine (PToV) 05:54 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoK41_2JS4E_ZZyJSH7g-AhiiwMoCoFCB (MSBR3.0-ORNL-4528) 30:51 http://www.citizen-films.fr/en/thorium/ (T:TFSoN)
Views: 145601 gordonmcdowell
Canadian Activists Target Uranium Industry
 
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http://EnergyInvestingNews.org/ The Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium is demanding that uranium exploration be suspended in Ontario until its impact on health, the environment and aboriginal land rights is properly addressed. uranium stock news Cameco (CCJ)
Views: 213 EnergyInvestingNews
Ramsey Hart, Mining Watch Canada
 
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Ramsey Hart of Mining Watch Canada, recorded March 17, 2011 at an open house on uranium mining organized by the Government of Nunavut.
Views: 779 James Bell
Orphan Mine Uranium Ore and NCA Vintage General Ratemeter-Scaler
 
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A demonstration of activity in a hand sample of Orphan Mine uranium ore. Orphan uranium ore samples are hard to find now, due to the fact that the mine is on Grand Canyon National Park and is off limits for collections. But there are some Orphan waste piles outside park boundaries, and samples such as this can be collected from the surface. No digging allowed though.
Views: 274 SRSchoner
☢ Fukushima "READY" to remove SFP#4 Hot Bent Nuclear Fuel Update 11/13/13
 
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Source and Remix this video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Y2_XU3S3fc Please subscribe and keep up to date with REAL updates on Fukushima at BeautifulGirlByDana http://tinyurl.com/ozcb8l6 He has been doing nightly LIVE Updates from Canada each night since the Latest BIG Earthquake off of Fukushima Japan on October 25, 2013. I suggest you take a look at All of his videos since October 25, 2013... Because what you will find Here (on MsMilkytheclown1), is a bunch MORE Propaganda "they" spew out.... I'm saving it, and archiving it all. I hope all of you will choose to do the same so these Bastards Are Held Accountable! Use "remix this video" button, please for Any or All of my videos! I don't feel like typing a bunch of info links for you today. I'll leave you with one video a friend of mine sent me called I'll Never Squat or Deadlift Again! by strengthcamp on youtube. Enjoy the message. http://youtu.be/J6h_UsFbvfs Latest Headlines from ENEnews.com US Gov't Headline: Alaska island "appears to show impacts from Fukushima" — "Significant cesium isotope signature" detected — Scientists anticipate more marine life to be impacted as ocean plume arrives (VIDEO) NHK: Holes near bottom of containment vessel identified for first time at Fukushima plant — "Gushing out" of Reactor No. 1 — Similar damage suspected at Units 2 and 3 (VIDEO) Multiple assemblies 'deformed' in Fukushima Unit 4 pool — One "bent at a 90-degree angle" — Tepco: Mistake occurred when handling the fuel... 25 years ago Nuclear Professor: Centuries before attempting any work on Fukushima molten fuel? — Concern over "potential phase separations" in corium More cancers in Fukushima children — Mother: We don't know what's actually going on, I can't trust gov't — TV: Private hospital finds cysts after 'official' tests were all clear (VIDEO) Reuters: Fukushima Unit 4 is "buckled and tilted and could collapse" — Bloomberg: "Engineers have been examining stability" of building, checking for "new vulnerabilities" Ex-Fukushima Worker: "This is the end!" I thought when seeing explosion at plant... "I knew how much fuel was there" — NHK: Reactor 3 blast "like being lifted up off floor" at home several miles away, I thought plane crashed outside (VIDEOS) Magazine: The Fukushima Crisis Comes to the U.S. — Professor: "New and improved version of the original atomic plague is spreading"; The truth is so incomprehensible it's easier to pretend it doesn't exist Scientists 'Alarmed' and 'Puzzled': Hundreds of sea turtles washing up dead on Pacific coast — Dogs "stopped breathing and died almost instantly" when eating them — Researchers analyzing toxicity — Many with reproductive problems Scientists "Especially Worried": "We don't know how the pathogen is doing this" — Sea star broke in half, walked away, then turned to goo — 'Environmental factors' to blame? — Hundreds wash up dead in Seattle (VIDEO) Radiation level hits record high at Fukushima plant well — Tepco: New leak "has not been confirmed" TV: University's research "is so disturbing" — Large spike in deadly flesh-eating bacteria after BP oil spill in Gulf — Expert: Take it very seriously — It's "in their bloodstream... affects all organs" (VIDEO) Top nuclear official blocks interviews with people over Fukushima exposures; Only allowed to talk to "friendly" gov't leaders — Reuters: "No matter how hard they try, radiation isn't going down" -Resident (VIDEO) Japan Expert: "All I can do is pray nothing goes wrong" at Fukushima Unit 4; Concern over "dangerous chain of events" — TV: "At least evacuate nearby residents" — NYTimes: No external supervision of Tepco; To start within 10 days (VIDEO) Japan Physician: I hope adults will leave Tokyo, not just children — Strange things happening — Medications don't seem to work — Rare diseases increasing dramatically (VIDEO) TV: "It's a crime what's happening at Fukushima" — People resettling areas 10 to 15 km from plant with "radiation levels still very, very high and even lethal in some cases" — Hotspots 60 to 70 km away same level as ghost towns in Chernobyl (VIDEOS) Newspaper: "Patronizing silence" from officials about Fukushima contamination in West Coast seafood; It's downright irresponsible, they are telling us nothing — Expert: "There is a real cause for concern" (VIDEO) Nuclear Expert: "There may be an accident of criticality" during fuel removal at Fukushima Unit 4 — TV: Rods could crumble, frightening Tepco in charge of potential catastrophe (VIDEOS) Japan Lawmaker: "Children coming down with many health problems... this is reality" — CNN: "Many parents of Fukushima blame nuclear accident" for higher cancer rate (VIDEOS) TV: "Fukushima is potentially the biggest ticking time bomb in human history" — "An enormous problem that's getting bigger" — Scariest part is what could still happen (VIDEO)
Bloody Coal
 
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How does mountaintop removal affect the environment? Mountaintop Removal is occurring right at the heart of one of the nations main hotspots of biological diversity. According to the Nature Conservancy, the mountain region including southwest Virginia, southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and northeastern Tennessee contains some of the highest levels of biological diversity in the nation. This region is also at the headwaters of the drinking water supplies of many US cities. The maps below show hotspots of biodiversity based on a rarity-weighted index biological diversity produced by the Nature Conservancy, as well as the major river systems with headwaters in the Appalachian coalfields. Unfortunately, there is little information on the cumulative impacts of mountaintop removal because the federal agencies that are charged with regulating coal mining have refused to track the overall extent and impacts of mountaintop removal. The one attempt at acomprehensive analysis of MTR by government agencies was presented in a multi-agency Environmental Impact Statement that was completed in 2003. This effort was initiated in the late 90s, but the focus of the EIS was revised after the White House changed hands in 2001. According to the Charleston Gazette: When it formally kicked off the project in February 1999, the EPA said the goal was to consider developing agency policies to minimize, to the maximum extent practicable the adverse environmental effects of mountaintop removal. By October 2001, then-Deputy Interior Secretary Steven J. Griles, a former mining industry lobbyist, had ordered the project refocused toward centralizing and streamlining coal mine permitting. Cindy Tibbot, a FWS biologist involved in the EIS process, was one of many agency scientists who expressed outrage about Griles directive, stating in an internal memo: Its hard to stay quiet about this when I really believe were doing the public and the heart of the Clean Water Act a great disservice. As Tibbot put it, the only alternatives offered in Griles proposed EIS would be: alternative locations to house the rubber stamp that issues the [mining] permits. While the EIS did compile a lot of disparate information on the effects and extent of MTR, the analysis was based on mining permit maps. According to satellite analysis done by Michael Shank at the TAGIS center of the West Virginia DEP, however, those permit maps are underestimating the extent of valley fill in 6 West Virginia coal counties by about 40%. Thus, the entire EIS is based on verifiably faulty data. Despite its many flaws, however, the multi-agency environmental impact statement did provide some useful information on the extent and impacts of mountaintop removal. Here are some of the impacts and concerns expressed in the final EPA report: More than 7 percent of Appalachian forests have been cut down and more than 1,200 miles of streams across the region have been buried or polluted between 1985 and 2001. Over 1000 miles of streams have been permitted to be buried in valley fills. (for scale, this is a greater distance than the length of the entire Ohio River). Mountaintop removal mining, if it continues unabated, will cause a projected loss of more than 1.4 million acres by the end of the decade-an area the size of Delaware-with a concomitant severe impact on fish, wildlife, and bird species, not to mention a devastating effect on many neighboring communities. 800+ square miles of mountains are estimated to be already destroyed. (this is equal to a one-quarter mile wide swath of destruction from New York to San Francisco - it is also significantly underestimated). Other quotes from the 2003 report include: … studies found that the natural return of forests to mountaintop mines reclaimed with grasses under hay and pasture or wildlife post-mining land uses occurs very slowly. Full reforestation across a large mine site in such cases may not occur for hundreds of years. Because it is difficult to intercept groundwater flow, it is difficult to reconstruct free flowing streams at mountaintop removal sites. Stream chemistry monitoring efforts show significant increases in conductivity, hardness, sulfate, and selenium concentrations downstream of [mountaintop removal] operations. http://www.ilovemountains.org
10 Places to go in a Zombie Apocalypse
 
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Where will you hide when zombies become a reality? Check out these 10 spots to learn the best places to hide during the flesh eating apocalypse. 10. Underground Zombies are walking the earth! But they ‘aint walking under it. Going underground would be a solid first choice during the inevitable mass zombie epidemic. Most underground structures are fully enclosed past their access points, making them easy to secure. You’re also safe from the elements down there and the cool temperature would help in preserving precious rations of food. If you’re really lucky, you’d crawl into a sweet underground lair like Wiltshire’s Secret Government City, made in the 1950’s to accommodate 4,000 people for 3 months with absolutely zero contact to the above-ground-world. 9. Ship at sea When brain-hungry flesh-eaters are roaming the land...just get off it! Pile onto a cruise ship and head for open water. You’ll be out of reach of the land-locked crawlers. And you can change your location to outrun the infection, sailing to more remote areas of the world to refuel and restock. 8. Farm A farm is ideal for the long term survivor. The one who is ready to raise a family in a post-apocalyptic nightmarish world of zombies, but also doesn’t want the kids to be emotionally damaged. A farm is the very definition of self-sustaining - a renewable ecosystem of plants, wildlife, and fresh water. Build a very, very tall wall and make a vicious fencing out of chicken wire. 7. Jails Jail is made to keep things in - think alcatraz. But with fortified walls, gun towers, reinforced doors, locks galore and the occasional moat, it’ll do a pretty good job of keeping things out, too! Think about it - guards staked out in tall turrets for maximum surveillance. Weapons already in stock. Walkie talkies and a P.A. system for easy group communication. Barbed wire. Even if the zombies did manage to get inside, everyone could grab a weapon and wait out the attack behind the steel bars of a prison cell. 6. Tree houses They were cool when you were a kid, and they’re even cooler when outliving a horde of skin crawling zombies: tree houses. The elevation offers an awesome vantage point to spot oncoming walkers. Then hoist up the ladder and attack from above! Or, graciously lower it to grant safety to stragglers. Jungles and forests offer the huge perk of isolation and are naturally dense sources of food and fresh water. The Korowai tribe of Papua build tree houses a staggering 140 feet off the jungle floor. Unfortunately, they’re also known for the most recently documented cases of cannibalism...so maybe build elsewhere if not getting eaten by other humans is your M.O. 5. Bank A bank is a solid choice. Literally. Bank vaults are made to withstand explosions detonated right against the doors. So long as the locking mechanism works from the inside, you would certainly be out of reach of hungry zombies. However, when Cornell University studied the real-life implications of a zombie outbreak, their scientists concluded that city centers will be the worst possible place to be. Seeing as many banks are in city centers, this is mostly good as a last ditch effort to hide when time runs out. 4. Cave or mine Similar to an underground city, a mine would offer a decently outfitted refuge because it is engineered to sustain human life in a less-than-comfortable environment. Mines are typically outfitted with air filtration systems and a system for bringing in and taking out supplies. Also like the underground city, entrances and exits of a mine are clearly labeled and mapped out, eliminating the likelihood of an infection spreading throughout the deep dark tunnels of rock. 3. Deep Sea Oil Rig Sure this one would be hard to get to, but if you made it out to an oil rig, you might just be set for the duration of the infection, waiting it out in relative comfort for the rot to set in and the zombies to decay. If popular culture is correct, zombies hate water. The tall platform would provide a 360-panoramic view of any incoming vessels, full of the unwanted living or not. Oil riggers are expected to work for months at a time so the rig would be supplied with enough food to feed a small community. 2. Military bunkers This one is a given...if you happen to be anywhere close to an unoccupied military bunker, climb in, lock the doors and get comfy. A military bunker is basically a decked-out vault for human beings. Built to be strong enough to survive nuclear blasts, zombies definitely wouldn’t be scratching their ways in. Discreet enough to hide from aerial scouts, zombies likely wouldn’t even find you. 1.sland Anything surrounded by a deep, expansive ring of water would do, but an entire island is particularly satisfying. For one, if you don’t survive, at least you can say you colonized an island in your life. Otherwise, with a whole ecosystem at your disposal, it will be fairly easy to forage for or catch nutritious food and find water.
Views: 6341 All Things Human
"DIRTY BUSINESS: How Mining Made Australia" - SBS Amharic
 
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Australia may have enjoyed an unprecedented mining boom, but very few Australians believe they've benefitted personally. In new research commissioned by SBS, only 1 in ten people believes they're financially better off because of mining - although almost half say it helped save the country from the impact of the Global Financial Crisis. - uploaded via http://www.mp32u.net/
Views: 1384 SBSAmharic
5 Ways The World Could End - And How We Can Survive It, with Joe Scott
 
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Watch Part 1: https://youtu.be/X2YtamBhSHg Visit our sponsor, Brilliant: https://brilliant.org/IsaacArthur/ Today we team up with Joe Scott to discuss 5 catastrophes that might threaten humanity in the future, and what we can do to prevent or mitigate them. Here in part 2, we will look at ways of dealing with those threat, which will include artificial intelligence, global warming & climate change, asteroids & comets, gamma ray bursts, and the eventual death of the Sun. Visit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.net Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthur SFIA Merchandise available: http://signil.com/sfia Social Media: Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/ Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content. SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/v5UKTsz Listen or Download the audio of this episode from Soundcloud: Episode's Audio-only version: https://soundcloud.com/isaac-arthur-148927746/5ways Episode's Narration-only version: https://soundcloud.com/isaac-arthur-148927746/5ways-narration-only Credits: 5 Ways the World Might End... and what we could to do to prevent it Episode 146, Season 4 E32 Writers: Isaac Arthur Script Editors: Jerry Guern Mark Warburton Producer: Isaac Arthur Cover Artist: Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygier Graphics Team Darth Biomech https://www.artstation.com/darth_biomech Jarred Eagley Jeremy Jozwik https://www.artstation.com/zeuxis_of_losdiajana Katie Byrne Ken York https://www.facebook.com/YDVisual/ Kristijan Tavcar Mihail Yordanov Sam McNamara of Rapid Thrash Sergio Botero https://www.artstation.com/sboterod?fref=gc Narrator Isaac Arthur Music: Miguel Johnson, "Finale" https://soundcloud.com/migueljohnsonmjmusic Miguel Johnson, "So Many Stars" https://soundcloud.com/migueljohnsonmjmusic Sergey Cheremisinov, "Labyrinth" https://www.s-cheremisinov.com Aerium, "Fifth Star from Aldebran" https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRnUJY3l5vIJFGsY3XvW4dQ Denny Schneidemesser, "Bridge Ambience" https://soundcloud.com/denny-schneidemesser Lombus, "Hydrogen Sonata" https://lombus.bandcamp.com Denny Schneidemesser, "Across the Universe" https://soundcloud.com/denny-schneidemesser
Views: 113391 Isaac Arthur
Georgia: Coal and Carbon
 
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Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel and the least expensive one used to generate electricity in the US. It's also the source of many local problems, including those caused by strip mining and mountaintop removal, as well as disposal of toxic coal ash. But the biggest threat of all may be to the entire planet: burning coal releases large amounts of carbon dioxide, or CO2 — and carbon dioxide is a major contributor to climate change. Scientists say if the world continues emitting carbon dioxide following current trends, the average global temperature could rise by 7 degrees Fahrenheit or more by the year 2100, and by 9 degrees or more in the U.S. The oceans, expanding as they warm and flooded with melt-water from glaciers and ice sheets on land, could rise between two and five feet. In Georgia, a state that gets 60 percent of its electricity from coal (the national average is 50 percent), residents are already worried about the effects on their state's economy and ecology. As the temperature rises, the Live Oak — the state tree — could find it hard to thrive. Coastal cities like Savannah, meanwhile, will be under increasing threat from the rising sea. Like others across the country, Georgians are connecting the dots between how they get their electricity and what the future holds for their lives. As a result, they're trying to figure out how to cut down on the CO2 emitted by burning coal. One answer might be to reduce the amount of coal used — but coal is abundant and inexpensive, and therefore hard to give up. Yet it's also possible to reduce the amount of CO2 that comes from a coal-fired power plant. That's the idea behind "clean coal" or, to use the more technical term, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). CCS technology could capture as much as 90% of the carbon dioxide emitted from coal power plants and pipe it deep underground, into porous formations of rock and sand that can absorb the CO2 and prevent its escape to the atmosphere. CCS technology appears to be viable, but implementing it at large scales is still at least a decade away. It also will require billions of dollars in investment, and some states, like Georgia, are less geologically suitable for storing carbon dioxide than others. CCS will make electricity from coal more expensive. And some opponents worry about whether any underground location can truly contain the CO2. The wider debate about clean coal and CCS is being played out on television, through a multimillion-dollar advertising war. Opponents say coal is a "dirty rock" that can't be wiped clean with an advertising campaign. They insist that even if the CO2 problem is fixed, mining, ash disposal and combustion will keep coal from being truly clean. The other side emphasizes the fact that coal is inexpensive, that the U.S. has domestic reserves that could last two hundred years or more, and that using coal is a prime way to help the U.S. remain competitive with fast-growing economies like China and India — both of which are major coal users. Even if CCS ultimately proves to be successful on a wide scale, experts say that there are steps people can immediately pursue to get a head start on reducing carbon dioxide emissions. "Efficiency is the first fuel that we should be going to," says Stephen Smith, Executive Director for the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. Others point out that reducing CO2 emissions to the degree needed to avoid major climate change will require not only efficiency improvements, but also a portfolio of options. CCS, they say, could be one such option. Toward that end, the federal government is currently directing some stimulus funding to help demonstrate CCS technologies. Meanwhile, Congress is debating legislation to regulate carbon-dioxide emissions. If such legislation is approved, that could ultimately provide the necessary incentive for coal-burning companies to invest billions of dollars in CCS — the amount needed to make CCS a reality. Footage credits: David Novack ("Burning the Future"), Georgia Power, America By Air, Appalachian Voices (I Love Mountains), Getty Images, J. Miles Cary/Knoxville News Sentinel, Ocean Footage, Shutterstock
Views: 1738 climatecentraldotorg
Recycling Rare Earths Weapons Its Cesium-137 Risks One Uranium Issue Australia Rally Waste Britain
 
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http://NukeNe.ws 3 workers suffer cardiac arrest at Japan waste incineration plant — 49 microSv hr found in scrap last month — Doctor associates with Cesium-137 exposure | Just In Study: Cesium-137 immediately damages the heart muscle — Not slow-acting | Fukushima Daiichi Unit 4, Unaddressed Risks | Recycling is one way to manage rare earths responsibly | Environmental and financial benefits of recycling rare earths | Britain looks at dubious technical "fixes" for its radioactive pile at Sellafield | New nuclear power plants - Georgia, Tennessee, South Carolina - just gobbling up money! | The underestimated dangers at Los Alamos nuclear weapons laboratory | An community solar energy scheme is paying off | Secrecy surrounding laser uranium enrichment technology, with its risks of nuclear weapons spread | Never mind Iran; NO COUNTRY can be trusted with nuclear weapons | Big nuclear powers annoyed at the idea of ASEAN nuclear free zone treaty | Book claims that Israel's Mossad killed Iranian nuclear scientists | Australia cannot ignore the problems of rare earths, and should develop recycling, as one answer | The anti uranium rally at Olympic Dam - an issue for all Australians, not just a fringe issue | The recycling of rare earths | Maritime Union of Australia to rally against proposed nuclear waste dump at Muckaty | Britain's desperate hunt to solve its plutonium garbage problem | Long range Holden Volt electric car and renewable energy | Solar power with energy storage will benefit Australian households, AND utility http://NukeNe.ws/Contributors Audio: http://soundaudiomusic.com
Views: 78 NukeNews
Curium Facts & Properties | Curium Cm uses | Health & Environmental effects of Curium Element
 
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Curium is a hard metal having an atomic number of 96 and symbol Cm. This metal is artificially produced in the nuclear reactors. It is electro-positive, radioactive and also a chemically active substance, which is not obtained naturally. This metal possesses some magnetic properties. As the temperature increases, the resistivity of this metal also increases. In the year 1944, Glenn Seaborg, Albert Ghiorso, and James discovered this metal and named after Marie Curie and Pierre Curie. The element is believed to glow red in the dark due to its radioactive nature. Atomic number 96 Atomic mass 247 Melting point 1345°C, 2453°F, 1618 K Boiling point 3110 °C, 5630°F, 3383 K Group Actinides; Period 7; Block f Curium has 15 isotopes out of which the most stable one is Curium-247 with a half-life of about 16 million years that undergoes alpha-decay to form plutonium-243. As it is not found naturally in the earth’s crust, the radioactive element has only been used in basic research studies due to its limited laboratory production. Also, it does not react with other compounds. However, curium-244 can be applicable as a power source for operating radioisotope thermoelectric generators used in spacecraft. Curium-244 has been used in Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometer to detect the presence of chemical elements in the atmosphere and rock surface compounds of Mars. Curium is a hazardous metal, which causes some health disorders when inhaled. It damages the liver and also causes breathing and gastrointestinal problems when ingested. The radiation, which is emitted by curium are likely to cause the destruction of the red blood cells. Improper disposal of curium leads to various environmental issues. Curium is found in nature in the form of its oxides. The radiation generated from this metal has many natural impacts. Curium is an insoluble chemical, which fixes to the soil particles.
Views: 84 Top Most 22
Alaska's Fragile Environment Threatened by a $500 Billion Gold Mine   (Full Documentary)
 
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Alaska's Fragile Environment Threatened by a $500 Billion Gold Mine (Full Documentary). Documentaries have for many decades inhabited the schedules of public broadcasters. They have chronicled the lives and institutions of western democracies. In the past two decades, however, documentaries have become recognised as an innovative cultural form. Instead of being exclusively funded by television channels, documentaries receive money from a number of sources, including film funds, private investors and foundations. Rather than observing, documentaries are now thought capable of changing the world. Documentaries have changed a lot of other people’s lives, too, and now more than ever. In fact, we’re in a Golden Age for docs, with more distribution outlets, more box office success, more public attention and more talented directors making more meaningful, impactful projects than ever before.The best documentaries illuminate a person, an event or an issue in powerful ways, giving thousands or even millions of people a chance to better understand something they knew little or nothing about. Documentaries are the perfect place for young filmmakers to begin learning their craft. That’s because fiction film is about re-creating a version of reality, tuned to the story’s dramatic necessities. Documentaries, by contrast, require only that students choose the subject matter and capture what is already there. Documentaries shine a light on some of the darkest corners of our planet, and by doing that and engaging audiences they can truly make a difference and prompt real change. You lose count of the number of times you hear documentaries trashed. The argument is as old as the documentary, and it goes like this. Docs manipulate reality, over-relying on effects such as music. They aren't really journalistic at all. Maybe one should think of them as drama without actors, cheaply made and with few pretensions to seriousness. Shamelessly, they pander to our worst voyeuristic impulses. Under the guise of telling the truth, docs entertain us with lies. It would be more accurate to say that documentaries are among the most valuable, neglected cultural forms of our time. They aren't all good, to be sure, but the best are unusual, persuasive, seductive. And their success has something to do with the way they are taken for granted, casually watched. Few old things have flourished in the cultural chaos of this century, but docs have steadily consolidated their hold on a small portion of the contemporary consciousness. Film stars want to make or sponsor them. Sometimes, if you squint hard enough, they really do seem like the new rock'n'roll. "Documentary," says the dictionary. "Noun. Based on or recreating an actual event, era, life story, that purports to be factually accurate and contains no fictional elements." This is useful, but a trifle over-cautious. Why shouldn't non-fiction contain elements of fiction? And why should something only "purport" to be factually accurate? It reeks of the old charges that docs are unreliable because they are filmed. When you describe anything, it is altered. The act of seeing modifies what is seen. Most people who watch docs understand this.No body of theory exists to legitimise docs and I'm grateful for this. They have come to subsist at a crossroads of contemporary culture, somewhere between journalism, film narrative and television entertainment. They appear to thrive on contradictions, between the stubborn reality they purport to capture and their necessarily limited means, between the impositions of storytelling and the desire to interpret or analyse. They aren't fictional, ever, but they can seem in their attractiveness more real than reality.
Views: 81 Montrose Gillement
CBC-NDP: Dumping Mining Waste into Lakes
 
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NDP Question about allowing mining companies to dump toxic waste into lakes.
Views: 649 yessir343
Tom Clynes: "The Boy Who Played with Fusion" | Talks at Google
 
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Science journalist and photographer Tom Clynes visited Google's office in Cambridge, MA to discuss his book "The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star". By the age of nine, Taylor Wilson had mastered the science of rocket propulsion. At eleven, his grandmother’s cancer diagnosis drove him to investigate new ways to produce medical isotopes. Three years later, he had built a 500-million-degree reactor and become the youngest person in history to achieve nuclear fusion. How could someone so young achieve so much, and what can Wilson’s story teach parents and teachers about how to support high-achieving kids? In this book, Tom Clynes narrates Wilson’s extraordinary journey—from his Arkansas home where his parents fully supported his intellectual passions, to a unique Reno, Nevada, public high school just for academic superstars, to the present, when Wilson is winning international science competitions with devices designed to prevent terrorists from shipping radioactive material into the country. Along the way, Clynes reveals how our education system shortchanges gifted students, and what we can do to fix it. Tom Clynes travels the world as a science writer and photojournalist. His work has appeared in National Geographic, Nature, the Washington Post, Popular Science, and many others. This is his second book.
Views: 7559 Talks at Google
Nuclear Power and Bomb Testing Documentary Film
 
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The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, or WIPP, is the world's third deep geological repository (after closure of Germany's Repository for radioactive waste Morsleben and the Schacht Asse II Salt Mine) licensed to permanently dispose of transuranic radioactive waste for 10,000 years that is left from the research and production of nuclear weapons. It is located approximately 26 miles (42 km) east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in eastern Eddy County. In order to address growing public unrest concerning construction of the WIPP, the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) was created in 1978. This group, charged with overseeing the WIPP, verified statements, facts, and studies conducted and released by the DOE regarding the facility. The stewardship this group provided effectively lowered public fear and let the facility progress with little public opposition in comparison to similar facilities around the nation such as Yucca Mountain in Nevada. The EEG, in addition to acting as a check for the government agencies overseeing the project, acted as a valuable advisor. In a 1981 drilling, pressurized brine was again discovered. The site was set to be abandoned when the EEG stepped in and suggested a series of tests on the brine and the surrounding area. These tests were conducted and the results showed that the brine deposit was relatively small and was isolated from other deposits. Drilling in the area was deemed safe due to these results. This saved the project valuable money and time by preventing a drastic relocation. In 1979 Congress authorized construction of the facility. In addition to formal authorization, Congress redefined the level of waste to be stored in the WIPP from high temperature to transuranic, or low level, waste. Transuranic waste often consists of materials which have come in contact with radioactive substances such as plutonium and uranium. This often includes gloves, tools, rags, and assorted machinery often used in the production of nuclear fuel and weapons. Although much less potent than nuclear reactor byproducts, this waste still remains radioactive for approximately 24,000 years. This change in classification led to a decrease in safety parameters for the proposed facility, allowing construction to continue at a faster pace. The first extensive testing of the facility was due to begin in 1988. The proposed testing procedures involved interring samples of low level waste in the newly constructed caverns. Various structural and environmental tests would then be performed on the facility to verify its integrity and to prove its ability to safely contain nuclear waste. Opposition from various external organizations delayed actual testing into the early 1990s. Attempts at testing were resumed in October 1991 with US Secretary of Energy James Watkins announcing that he would begin transportation of waste to the WIPP. Despite apparent progress on the facility, construction still remained costly and complicated. Originally conceptualized in the 1970s as a warehouse for waste, the repository now had regulations similar to those of nuclear reactors. As of December 1991, the plant had been under construction for 20 years and was estimated to have cost over one billion dollars. At the time, WIPP officials reported over 28 different organizations claiming authority over operations of the facility. In November 1991, a federal judge ruled that Congress must approve WIPP before any waste, even for testing purposes, was sent to the facility. This indefinitely delayed testing until Congress gave its approval. The 102nd United States Congress passed legislation allowing use of the WIPP. The House of Representatives approved the facility on October 6, 1992 and the Senate passed a bill allowing the opening of the facility on October 8 of the same year. The bill was met with much opposition in the Senate. Senator Richard H. Bryan fought the bill based on safety issues that concerned a similar facility located in Nevada, the state for which he was serving as senator. His efforts almost prevented the bill from passing. New Mexico senators Pete V. Domenici and Jeff Bingaman effectively reassured Senator Bryan that these issues would be addressed in the 103rd Congress. The final legislation provided safety standards requested by the House and an expedited timeline requested by the Senate. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waste_Isolation_Pilot_Plant
Views: 627789 The Film Archives
Surviving in the Expanse of Space
 
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Use my link http://www.audible.com/isaac to get a free copy of "Leviathan Wakes" Space is an incredibly harsh and immense environment absent of everything we need to live, and abundant only in harsh radiation and dangerous micro-meteors. Today we will examine how those will impact humans who come to dwell on space ships or habitats. Visit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.net Join the Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/ Support the Channel on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthur Visit the sub-reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/ Listen or Download the audio of this episode from Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/isaac-arthur-148927746/Surviving-in-the-Expanse-of-Space Cover Art by Jakub Grygier: https://www.artstation.com/artist/jakub_grygier Credits: Surviving in the Expanse of Space Season 4, Episode 15 Writers Isaac Arthur Editors Keith Blockus Mark Warburton N Kern Producer Isaac Arthur Cover Artist Jakub Grygier Graphics Team Jarred Eagley Jeremy Jozwik Katie Byrne Luuk Warringa Nick Nieuwoudt Sam McNamara Sergio Botero: https://www.artstation.com/sboterod?fref=gc Narrator Isaac Arthur Music Manager Luca De Rosa - [email protected] Music Lombus, "Cosmic Soup" https://lombus.bandcamp.com Denny Schneidemesser, "Novus Aeterno Bridge Ambience" https://soundcloud.com/denny-schneidemesser A.J. Prasad, "Staring Through" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xA8-7qwaEPU Brandon Liew, "Into the Storm" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQ2I19QUIXA
Views: 131148 Isaac Arthur
grinding of mine tailings
 
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More Details : http://wwa.stonecrushersolution.org/solutions/solutions.html we will provide a professional answer and quality of services. If this video does not meet your needs I apologize here. Visit Website: http://www.gospellightbaptistschool.com Contact Us For Help: http://www.gospellightbaptistschool.com/chat.html Effect of Lime on the Index Properties of Black Cotton Soil Effect of Lime on the Index Properties of Black Cotton Soil and Mine tailings mixtures www.iosrjen.org 2, P a g e Mineral Processing Wastes, Material Description, User Table 9, 2 provides some published physical property data on a copper tailings sample from Arizona. These data are probably representative of the physical Geo, engineering properties of zinc mine tailings Geotechnical properties of zinc/lead mine tailings grinding processes generate two material types that are distinguished by their particle size TRIUMPH MINE TAILINGS PILES Last Update: February, 2007 Site Description The Triumph Mine Tailings Piles site is an inactive mine which consists of two large tailings piles, a waste rock pile Sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in chrysotile mine tailings Highlights ? Crusts of hydrated Mg, carbonate form on the tailings of Woodsreef Asbestos Mine. ? Hydromagnesite crusts precipitate from evaporating meteoric water. Reprocessing Old Hard Rock Gold Mine Mill Tailings reprocessing old hard rock gold mine mill tailings. CALIFORNIA SLUICE BOX HARD ROCK MILLING. Processing Equipment Hard rock processing equipment for the small Have Characterization and treatment of artisanal gold mine tailings 1. Introduction. Several cases of environment degradation due to artisanal gold mine operations in tropical region have been reported , and . After the 1980s, the Tailings, The Full Wiki Tailings composition. The composition of tailings is directly dependent on the composition of the ore and the process of mineral extraction used on the ore. recovery of magnetite from fly ash flue dust tailings recovery of magnetite from fly ash flue dust tailings. You are here: Home; recovery of magnetite from fly ash flue dust tailings Tailings and Mine Waste Storage, Filter, pressed, Dry, stack The Importance of Fine, grinding in the Cyanide, treatment of Relatively little information is available regarding the cyclic behaviour of consolidated mine tailings. Tailings processing crusher search Tailings processing crusher search Products. As a leading global manufacturer of crushing, grinding and mining equipments, we offer advanced, reasonable solutions for Geotechnical Properties of Zinc/Lead Mine Tailings from Tara This paper presents the geotechnical properties of the zinc/lead mine tailings from Tara Mines in County Meath, Ireland. The coarser and finer materials from the mineral grinding equipment to mine gold for sale Mineral Grinding Equipment To Mine Gold For Sale . gold mining equipment crushing and grinding machine for 26 Dec 2013 Details & Price Info @ SBM Products Tailings : Map (The Full Wiki) Tailings (also known as slimes, tailings pile, tails, leach residue, or slickens) are the materials left over after the process of separating the valuable fraction Minerals Recovery of Copper Mine Tailings on Lake Superior Minerals Recovery of Copper Mine Tailings on Lake Superior Coastline for Use as Raw Material in the Manufacture of Roofing Shingles EPA Contract Number: EPD07034 Final Report, Minerals Recovery of Copper Mine Tailings on Final Report: Minerals Recovery of Copper Mine Tailings on Lake Superior Coastline for Use as Raw Material in the Manufacture of Roofing Shingles Tailings Disposal Options for the Kensington Mine at Berners Tailings Disposal Options for the Kensington Mine at Berners Bay Near Juneau, Alaska: Authors. Ben Robinson Alida Bus Bryan Diebels Ephraim Froehlich Kennecott Tailings Storage, Minerals Education Coalition Kennecott Utah Copper's tailings are the uneconomic by, product of the ore crushing, grinding, and flotation concentrating process at the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine. Mining / Milling Processes and Tailings Generation Mining/Milling and Tailings Generation Table 2 Typical chemical and mineralogical composition of tailings solids and natural sediments in Rupert Inlet, B.C. Projects, LoadPath Contact Info. 201, 3991 Henning Drive Burnaby, BC. Phone: 604.294.9191. Fax: 604.294.9195. Email: [email protected] Marine and Riverine Discharges of Mine Tailings Marine and Riverine Discharges of Mine Tailings 2013 3 Preface This report presents a world, wide inventory of operating mines that dispose of mine tailings to marine crusher for gold tai
Views: 232 Dacuk Porty
Kangana Ranaut with Sadhguru - In Conversation with the Mystic @Mumbai 2018
 
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Get ready for an Explosive Conversation when India's Youth Icon meets the Epitome of Truth! #KanganaWithSadhguru #InConversationWithTheMystic #Sadhguru Download Sadhguru App 📲 http://onelink.to/sadhguru__app Yogi, mystic and visionary, Sadhguru is a spiritual master with a difference. An arresting blend of profundity and pragmatism, his life and work serves as a reminder that yoga is a contemporary science, vitally relevant to our times. Subscribe to Sadhguru YouTube Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/user/sadhguru?sub_confirmation=1 Official Sadhguru Website http://www.isha.sadhguru.org Official Social Profiles of Sadhguru https://facebook.com/sadhguru https://instagram.com/sadhguru https://twitter.com/SadhguruJV Free Online Guided Yoga & Meditation by Sadhguru http://isha.sadhguru.org/5-min-practices http://isha.sadhguru.org/IshaKriya
Views: 1147407 Sadhguru
NWW World-Interview Nuke expert Kate Hudson alarmed by depleted uranium use in Libya 10.05.2011
 
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Nuke expert Kate Hudson alarmed by depleted uranium use in Libya 10.05.2011 SOUNDBITE: Kate Hudson, activist from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, (speaking English): "Well, unfortunately what we were fearing does seem now to be taking place. It hasn't been some kind of quick humanitarian swoop that would be over very rapidly and peace and justice would be miraculously introduced. Unfortunately that hasn't happened, and we see now from the initial number of countries involved, now we have NATO involvement, we seem to more entrenched there, there doesn't seem to be any visible ending in sight. It's now widely recognized that it is indeed a civil war, and that of course intervention in a civil war is illegal. And I think one of the most tragic element is of course the repeated incidents of the interventionist forces actually killing the side they are there to support, which does really underline the complexity of the situation, the difficulty of the situation, and the absolute inappropriateness of military intervention. RT: "What would you like to see happen now? You wouldn't want to see NATO pulling out and leaving the Libyans essentially to a bloody civil war?" SOUNDBITE: Kate Hudson, activist from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, (speaking English): "Well, unfortunately I think that that would indeed be the most appropriate thing to do. It's a complex situation. It was initially suggested that there was one mad dictator going around killing his people en masse -- it is now clear there are two political and military sides. In a complex situation like that it maybe very difficult to move towards a negotiated political settlement, but that is what has to be done. Military means are not a quick fix, and there is no substitute for that detailed kind of negotiation facilitated by the international community. It is going to be hard, but that has to take place." RT: "What do we know about the weaponry being used in Libya? I'm thinking specifically of depleted uranium. We've heard Prime Minister David Cameron saying that it's definitely not being used, and yet the Ministry of Defense still says that it's a necessary part of the arsenal." SOUNDBITE: Kate Hudson, activist from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, (speaking English): "It's quite an interesting contradiction that has emerged there. It led some people to suspect that David Cameron didn't really understand what depleted uranium was, and that perhaps he was talking about cluster munitions. But there are very serious concerns that depleted uranium munitions are now being used in Libya. Depleted uranium is a byproduct of the uranium enrichment process for civil nuclear power, it results in a very, very heavy metal, very dense heavy metal, and it's typically used in armor-piercing shells, that's why it is popular with some armies. And both the US and the UK do still have the policy of using depleted uranium munitions. The weaponry that Britain is currently deploying is not suitable for Britain's munitions, they are land-based munitions in our case, but certainly the US typically uses depleted uranium munitions on A-10 airplanes, those that are kind of gun ships, which are essentially planes constructed round the cannon, and they can fire a thousands of rounds of depleted uranium munitions. Depleted uranium is a weapon of indiscriminate effect. When a shell hits its target it explodes and it has what has been described as a kind of 'aerosol effect' of radioactive particles. And you cannot ever ensure that those particles will only affect military personnel. That means that they may indiscriminately affect civilians and that is of course illegal under international law. Also it can have a very long-term effect, because of the radioactive quality. It has a negative impact also on the environment, so these are illegal under international law. It's absolutely unacceptable in any case, particularly if you are talking about being there to protect the civilians, to use a form of weaponry which will impact on them in so devastating way, it's absolutely shocking."
Views: 629 dahast de
What Is A Slope Mine?
 
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https://goo.gl/6U6t22 - Subscribe For more Videos ! For more Health Tips | Like | Comment | Share : ▷ CONNECT with us!! #HealthDiaries ► YOUTUBE - https://goo.gl/6U6t22 ► Facebook - https://goo.gl/uTP7zG ► Twitter - https://twitter.com/JuliyaLucy ► G+ Community - https://goo.gl/AfUDpR ► Google + - https://goo.gl/3rcniv ► Visit us - http://healthaware.in/ ► Blogger - https://juliyalucy.blogspot.in/ Watch for more Health Videos: ► How To Avoid Unwanted Pregnancy Naturally: https://goo.gl/hRy93e ► Period Hacks || How To Stop Your Periods Early: https://goo.gl/dSmFgi ► Cold and Flu Home Remedies: https://goo.gl/biPp8b ► Homemade Facial Packs: https://goo.gl/NwV5zj ► How To Lose Belly Fat In 7 Days: https://goo.gl/EHN879 ► Powerfull Foods for Control #Diabetes: https://goo.gl/9SdaLY ► Natural Hand Care Tips At Home That Work: https://goo.gl/YF3Exa ► How to Tighten #SaggingBreast: https://goo.gl/ENnb6b ► Natural Face Pack For Instant Glowing Skin: https://goo.gl/gvd5mM ► Get Rid of Stretch Marks Fast & Permanently: https://goo.gl/ZVYvQZ ► Eating Bananas with Black Spots: https://goo.gl/gXuri6 ► Drink this Juice every day to Cure #Thyroid in 3 Days: https://goo.gl/L3537H ► How Garlic Improves Sexual Stamina? https://goo.gl/GNcbYU ► Benefits of using Egg Shells: https://goo.gl/hAUyUS ► Home Remedies to Gain Weight Fast: https://goo.gl/jBVVQh ► Amazing Benefits of Olive Oil for Health: https://goo.gl/R3583v ► Rapid Relief of Chest Pain (Angina): https://goo.gl/idAFZR ► Home Remedies for Joint & Arthritis Pains Relief: https://goo.gl/jRbNkh ► SHOCKING TRICKs For #Diabetes Control: https://goo.gl/ATDDsV ► Doctors Are Shocked! #Diabetics: https://goo.gl/ZeQddJ ► Home Remedies for Gastric Troubles: https://goo.gl/72VR1b ► Juice for #Diabetics Type 2: https://goo.gl/3vDMqR --------- Slope mines differ from shaft and drift mines, which access resources by tunneling straight down or horizontally, respectively. We have constructed many miles of slopes various sizes both from the surface to underground and location. But these structures are above all natural geological and geomechanical features the looking for slope mine? Find out information about mine. Factor of safety could be reduced from 1,3 to 1. A subsurface mine answer key b feedback page 302 figure 12. A mine opened by a slope or an incline explanation of sep 22, 2015 whether underground on the surface, unexpected rock movement can cause injuries and potentially result in catastrophe. Increasing the pit slope angle by only a few degrees can decrease stripping costs oct 19, 2009 mining is type of underground where entrance to mine tunnel constructed on slant from surface down towards coal seam. Mining has this review discusses rock slope stability at open pit mines. Slope mines differ from shaft and drift mines, which access resources by tunneling straight down or horizontally, respectively slope mining is a process of accessing valuable geological material, like coal. Even relatively shallow strip mines and quarries can experience devastating consequences from slope failure. If the water level increases. But these structures are above all natural geological and geomechanical graphic a. From glossary of mining terms (2016) by illinois department commerce and economic opportunity. The 'slope stability radar' (ssr) has been developed to better manage those risks. The ssr remotely scans rock slopes to continuously measure any surface movement and can be used. In all cases in open pit mining practice more than 40. Lengths have varied from a couple of hundred aiming at the practice uniting surface mining and underground interaction, thin plate model mined slope was established with influence analysis to slope, distortion stress distribution law studied. In a slope mine, the coal seam tends to be very deep and located parallel ground, though actual mine not i. It resembles a tunnel, drift, or shaft, depending on its inclinationprev slope hoistnext stability glossary searchmindat is an outreach project of mine. Slope mine definitions defined term. Agricultural terraces d. Cdc mining topic slope stability niosh. An open pit surface mine c. Googleusercontent search. Glossary of mining terms kentucky coal educationmine slope influenced by underground design and implementation in open pit mines geological mine. Mine slope slideminder mining wikipedia. A slope mine correct b. Therefore their design and implementation must be conducted with all consideration including technical, economical, environmental safety issues. Slope mining is a method of accessing valuable geological material, such as coal or ore. Definition of slope mine mindat glossary. Links to books, online courses, computer codes and software are given, as well several consulting companies with experience in rock slope
Views: 57 Fredda Winkleman