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Rarest of the Rare: Behind the Treasures at the Harvard Museum of Natural History
 
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Panel Discussion and Book Signing with: James Hanken, Professor of Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Curator in Herpetology; Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology; and Director, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University Nancy Pick, Science Writer and Editor Donald Pfister, Asa Gray Professor of Systematic Botany and Curator of the Farlow Library and Herbarium, Harvard University Raquel Alonso Perez, Curator, Harvard Mineralogical & Geological Museum In the words of biologist Edward O. Wilson, the Harvard Museum of Natural History stands as both "cabinet of wonder and temple of science." Its rich and unlikely history involves literary figures, creationists, millionaires, and visionary scientists, from Asa Gray to Stephen Jay Gould. First published in 2004, Rarest of the Rare tells fascinating stories about the vast and diverse collections of animals, minerals, and plants housed at the museum. To celebrate the book’s reissue, a panel will discuss the relevance of the museum’s scientific collections in thetwenty-first century and the value of knowing the history of these great treasures. November 12, 2015, 6:00pm
Matthew Restall - Cortez' Tiger and the Halls of Montezuma: The History of an International Lie
 
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Cortez' Tiger and the Halls of Montezuma: The History of an International Lie Speaker: Matthew Restall, Pennsylvania State University Invasion leads to surrender and a better life for the conquered—according to the invaders, that is. We know this to be the case, and we expect deception to be central to conquest and to histories written by victors. And yet we continue to believe the colossal lies generated by conquests, helping those lies survive for centuries. This preview of a new book on the famous Spanish destruction of the Aztec Empire questions the conquest story we thought we knew, exposing the great lie at its heart. Once we realize how powerful and persistent such deceptions have been, we must surely ask whether official lies to justify wars are merely a thing of the past, or whether they are a present danger that imperils our future? See more: https://www.socsci.uci.edu/newsevents/events/2017/2017-02-16-restall.php
Views: 318 UCI Media
old and first made things must watch!!!!
 
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old and first made things must watch!!!! The history of film began in the 1890s, when motion picture cameras were invented and film production companies started to be established. Because of the limits of technology, films of the 1890s were under a minute long and until 1927 motion pictures were produced without sound. The first decade of motion picture saw film moving from a novelty to an established large-scale entertainment industry. The films became several minutes long consisting of several shots. The first rotating camera for taking panning shots was built in 1898. The first film studios were built in 1897. Special effects were introduced and film continuity, involving action moving from one sequence into another, began to be used. In the 1900s, continuity of action across successive shots was achieved and the first close-up shot was introduced (that some claim D. W. Griffith invented). Most films of this period were what came to be called "chase films". The first use of animation in movies was in 1899. The first feature length multi-reel film was a 1906 Australian production. The first successful permanent theatre showing only films was "The Nickelodeon" in Pittsburgh in 1905. By 1910, actors began to receive screen credit for their roles, and the way to the creation of film stars was opened. Regular newsreels were exhibited from 1910 and soon became a popular way for finding out the news. Overall, from about 1910, American films had the largest share of the market in Australia and in all European countries except France. New film techniques were introduced in this period including the use of artificial lighting, fire effects and low-key lighting (i.e. lighting in which most of the frame is dark) for enhanced atmosphere during sinister scenes. As films grew longer, specialist writers were employed to simplify more complex stories derived from novels or plays into a form that could be contained on one reel and be easier to be understood by the audience – an audience that was new to this form of storytelling. Genres began to be used as categories; the main division was into comedy and drama, but these categories were further subdivided. During the First World War there was a complex transition for the film industry. The exhibition of films changed from short one-reel programs to feature films. Exhibition venues became larger and began charging higher prices. By 1914, continuity cinema was the established mode of commercial cinema. One of the advanced continuity techniques involved an accurate and smooth transition from one shot to another. D. W. Griffith had the highest standing among American directors in the industry, because of the dramatic excitement he conveyed to the audience through his films. The American industry, or "Hollywood", as it was becoming known after its new geographical center in California, gained the position it has held, more or less, ever since: film factory for the world and exporting its product to most countries. By the 1920s, the United States reached what is still its era of greatest-ever output, producing an average of 800 feature films annually,[1] or 82% of the global total (Eyman, 1997). During late 1927, Warners released The Jazz Singer, with the first synchronized dialogue (and singing) in a feature film. By the end of 1929, Hollywood was almost all-talkie, with several competing sound systems (soon to be standardized). Sound saved the Hollywood studio system in the face of the Great Depression (Parkinson, 1995). The desire for wartime propaganda created a renaissance in the film industry in Britain, with realistic war dramas. The onset of American involvement in World War II also brought a proliferation of films as both patriotism and propaganda. The House Un-American Activities Committee investigated Hollywood in the early 1950s. During the immediate post-war years the cinematic industry was also threatened by television, and the increasing popularity of the medium meant that some film theatres would bankrupt and close. Following the end of World War II in the 1940s, the following decade, the 1950s, marked a 'Golden Age' for non-English world cinema. Roundhay Garden Scene is an 1888 short silent film recorded by French inventor Louis Le Prince. It is believed to be the oldest surviving film in existence, as noted by the Guinness Book of Records.[2] The film Sortie de l'usine Lumière de Lyon (1895) by French Louis Lumière is considered the "first true motion picture "[3] -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "8 Limited Edition Products That You Will Probably Never Get Your hands On Youtube" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qm2rKfrgGlA -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 84 King Rulers
Beyond Our Paradise (2018 documentary)
 
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Exploring the hidden side of past and current events: covering: Israel and the theft of the Palestinian land, the difference between Jewish people and Zionists, our Monetary-System and the Rothschild global banking syndicate, the downfall of countries resisting the Rothschild family, the threat to our Privacy and Freedom of Speech. Historic events from World War 1 and World War 2, to Concentration Camps and Eugenics. The documentary will also cover Political Correctness, the Transgender Agenda and much more. If you want to support us create more videos you can help us the following way: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Whatcoulditbe Paypal: http://goo.gl/m7uEWh Merchandise: http://www.cafepress.com/whatcoulditbe Video quality: HD1080p60 English Subtitles
Views: 1102 What could it be
The One-Cent Magenta, James Barron, Maynard Sundman Lecture 2017
 
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The Fourteenth Maynard Sundman Lecture took place Thursday, September 21, 2017 at the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum. The museum welcomed Mr. James Barron, who published the book titled "The One-Cent Magenta: Inside the Quest to Own the Most Valuable Stamp in the World." Through the stories of those who have bought, owned, and sold the One-Cent Magenta, James Barron delivered a fascinating tale of global history and immense wealth, and of the human desire to collect. Born in Washington, D.C., Mr. Barron joined the New York Times in June 1977 after graduating from Princeton University, where he had been the paper’s correspondent during his junior and senior years. https://postalmuseum.si.edu/sundman
Views: 317 SmithsonianNPM
荒野の7人 Magnificent Seven
 
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Magnificent Seven
Views: 303880 karakasa1
Perth
 
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Perth /ˈpɜrθ/ is the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth most populous city in Australia, with an estimated population of 1.97 million (on 30 June 2013) living in Greater Perth. Part of the South West Land Division of Western Australia, the majority of the metropolitan area of Perth is located on the Swan Coastal Plain, a narrow strip between the Indian Ocean and the Darling Scarp, a low coastal escarpment. The first areas settled were on the Swan River, with the city's central business district and port (Fremantle) both located on its shores. Perth is formally divided into a number of local government areas, which themselves consist of a large number of suburbs, extending from Two Rocks in the north to Rockingham in the south, and east inland to The Lakes. Perth was originally founded by Captain James Stirling in 1829 as the administrative centre of the Swan River Colony, and gained city status in 1856 (currently vested in the smaller City of Perth). The city is named for Perth, Scotland, by influence of Sir George Murray, then British Secretary of State for War and the Colonies. The city's population increased substantially as a result of the Western Australian gold rushes in the late 19th century, largely as a result of emigration from the eastern colonies of Australia. During Australia's involvement in World War II, Fremantle served as a base for submarines operating in the Pacific Theatre, and a US Navy Catalina flying boat fleet was based at Matilda Bay. An influx of immigrants after the war, predominantly from Britain, Greece, Italy and Yugoslavia, led to rapid population growth. This was followed by a surge in economic activity flowing from several mining booms in the late 20th and early 21st centuries that saw Perth become the regional headquarters for a number of large mining operations located around the state. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 315 Audiopedia
Fremantle
 
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Fremantle is a major Australian port city in Western Australia, located at the mouth of the Swan River. Fremantle Harbour serves as the port of Perth, the state capital. Fremantle was the first area settled by the Swan River colonists in 1829. It was declared a city in 1929, and has a population of approximately 27,000. The city is named after Captain Charles Fremantle, the English naval officer who had pronounced possession of Western Australia and who established a camp at the site. The city contains well-preserved 19th century buildings and other heritage features. The Western Australian vernacular diminutive for Fremantle is Freo. The Nyungar name for the area is Walyallup. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 85 Audiopedia
African American Life in Washington, DC, Before Emancipation
 
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Dr. Maurice Jackson (G'95, G'01), a member of the Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation, takes parts in a panel discussion on April 13th, 2016 at the U.S. National Archives. Other panelists included Mark Auslander, Central Washington University and NMAAHC curators Nancy Bercaw and Mary Elliott. John W. Franklin of the National Museum of African American History and Culture served as the moderator. The panel was presented in partnership with the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the D.C. Commission of African American Affairs, and the DC Commission on Emancipation. #wgsmr
Views: 66 Georgetown Events
Webinar: New Tool for Antibody Specificity Testing
 
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This webinar introduces a new technology OriGene develops for the validation of antibody specificity. Non-specific antibodies recognize "off-targets" in addition to their intended targets, which could generate false-positive results. This new tool, High-density Protein Microarray, has been used to test the specificity of commercial diagnostic antibodies and found some are not specific to their targets. This tool is also applied to identify the ultra-specific antibodies UltraMABs.
OriGene Webinar Series: TissueScan cDNA Arrays
 
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Webinar on TissueScan products -- Cancer and Normal Tissue cDNA Arrays -- how you obtain qPCR gene expression results of hundreds of human samples in 2 hours. Follow this link for more details: http://www.origene.com/qPCR/Tissue-qPCR-Arrays.aspx
Walden Audiobook by Henry David Thoreau | Audiobooks Youtube Free | Part 2
 
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Walden by Henry David Thoreau is one of the best-known non-fiction books written by an American. Published in 1854, it details Thoreau’s life for two years, two months, and two days around the shores of Walden Pond. Walden is neither a novel nor a true autobiography, but a social critique of the Western World, with each chapter heralding some aspect of humanity that needed to be either renounced or praised. Along with his critique of the civilized world, Thoreau examines other issues afflicting man in society, ranging from economy and reading to solitude and higher laws. He also takes time to talk about the experience at Walden Pond itself, commenting on the animals and the way people treated him for living there, using those experiences to bring out his philosophical positions. This extended commentary on nature has often been interpreted as a strong statement to the natural religion that transcendentalists like Thoreau and Emerson were preaching. (Description amended from Wikipedia). Genre(s): *Non-fiction, Nature, Philosophy Walden Henry David THOREAU
Makossa
 
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Views: 2960 Makossa Meubles