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The true impact of uranium mining
 
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Views: 1516 News24
Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Experimental Uranium Mining in Meghalaya!
 
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The full scale mining of uranium in my native land should be blocked and stopped at all cost.
Views: 1683 Bremley Lyngdoh
Environmental impact of brown coal and uranium mining in East Germany (Documentary, 1991)
 
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In the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union the world became aware of the devastating impact on the environment and on the health of the people by brown coal and uranium mining in the former East Germany and Czechoslovakia. SAG/SDAG Wismut was a uranium mining company in East Germany during the time of the cold war. It produced a total of 230,400 tonnes of uranium between 1947 and 1990 and made East Germany the fourth largest producer of uranium ore in the world at the time. It was the largest single producer of uranium ore in the entire sphere of control of the USSR. In 1991 after German reunification it was transformed into the Wismut GmbH company, owned by the Federal Republic of Germany, which is now responsible for the restoration and environmental cleanup of the former mining and milling areas. The head office of SDAG Wismut / Wismut GmbH is in Chemnitz-Siegmar. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wismut_(mining_company) Original title: Black Triangle A film by Ron Orders © 1991, Licensed by Cinecontact Subscribe to wocomoHISTORY: https://goo.gl/oXDoxY Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wocomo
Views: 120 wocomoHISTORY
Medical Effects of Uranium Mining on Population & Native Peoples (Dr. Caldicott & Prof. Brugge)
 
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http://ifyoulovethisplanet.org/?p=5785 Dr. Helen Caldicott's websites: http://ifyoulovethisplanet.org http://nuclearfreeplanet.org/ http://www.helencaldicott.com/ "Prof. Doug Brugge on the medical effects of uranium mining and how mining particularly harms Native peoples" This week's guest is Doug Brugge, a professor in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. He is the author of The Navajo People and Uranium Mining and the associate editor of the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. His research includes studies of asthma; the impact of culture and language on health communication; the impact of environmental tobacco smoke; traffic pollution and cardiovascular disease; and the impact of uranium mining and processing on Native Americans. Prof. Brugge and Dr. Caldicott cover how they both started their antinuclear activism with Native peoples in the U.S. and Australia, respectively. Topics discussed in this episode include the health effects of radon, how uranium mining induces lung cancer, the cover-up of the harm caused to Native American uranium miners and their communities, the enlargement of uranium mining operations in Australia and elsewhere, and how Native peoples in many places, from India to Canada to North America and Australia, find themselves in harm's way when their land is found to contain mineable uranium. Relevant to this interview are the articles Australia's aboriginal communities clamour against uranium mining, http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/aug/09/austrailia-aboriginal-uranium-mining Aborigines to block uranium mining after Japan disaster http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/australasia/aborigines-to-block-uranium-mining-after-japan-disaster-2267467.html and Uranium Contamination Haunts Navajo Country http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/27/us/27navajo.html?_r=1 FAIR USE NOTICE: Any copyrighted (©) material is made available to advance understanding of ecological, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, which constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. See also: Nuclear Regulatory Commission daily reports (what's happening at nuclear plants near you): http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/event-status/event/2012/ Union of Concerned Scientists (watchdog over NRC): http://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear_power/ Articles compiled by Dr. Helen Caldicott: Fukushima Nuclear Plant at High Risk for Major Earthquake http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/02/14-2 Fears Growing as Fukushima Reactor Temperature Rising http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/02/12-0 Temperature Soars Mysteriously Inside Fukushima Nuclear Reactor http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/02/06-0 Fukushima: A Nuclear War without a War: The Unspoken Crisis of Worldwide Nuclear Radiation http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=28870 French Scientists: Childhood Leukemia Spikes Near Nuclear Reactors https://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/01/26-2 Japanese Govt Kept Secret Worst-Case Scenario Post-Fukushima https://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/01/22-4 Cesium from Fukushima plant fell all over Japan http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201111260001 Fukushima cesium 'equals 168 Hiroshimas' http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/110825/fuk... After Fukushima: Enough Is Enough by Helen Caldicott http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/02/opinion/magazine-global-agenda-enough-is-en... Women Fight to Save Fukushima's Children http://www.truth-out.org/women-fight-save-fukushimas-children/1320681047 Japan must say no to nuclear! http://www.newint.org/features/web-exclusive/2011/12/20/japan-must-say-no-to-... Nuclear News and Updates: http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/04/fukushima-i-nuke-plant-japan-nuclear.html http://enenews.com/ http://fukushima-diary.com/ http://fukushimaupdate.com/ http://nukefree.org/ http://www.llrc.org/ http://enformable.com/ http://radioactive.eu.com/ http://masterofmanythings.com/radiation_updates.html http://www.scoop.it/t/nuclear-news-what-the-physics http://blog.safecast.org/ http://www.nuc.berkeley.edu/UCBAirSampling http://www.enviroreporter.com/ http://fukushimaemergencywhatcanwedo.blogspot.com/2011/09/nuclear-expert-says... http://enformable.com/2011/09/nuclear-experts-say-fukushima-is-turning-out-to... http://www.nuclearhealth.org/ http://japanfocus.org/-Say_Peace-Project/3549 http://changeagents2011.wordpress.com/ http://robertsingleton.wordpress.com/ http://www.nirs.org/reactorwatch/accidents/Fukushimafactsheet.pdf http://capitoilette.com/2011/12/30/the-party-line-december-30-2011-the-party-...
Views: 2049 rumorecurioso
The Nuclear Grave of India - Jadugoda
 
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My 2nd stop during the 900 km solo cycling expedition through Jharkhand was Jadugoda, the nuclear capital of Jharkhand. Since 1967, Uranium Corporation of India Limited has been mining and processing Uranium here. The radiation exposure resulting from utter disregard for health and safety compliances has resulted in a living nightmare for the locals. Cancer, birth defects, miscarriages and sterility are commonplace. Here is what i saw while interacting with the villagers near Jadugoda mines. Music: Balmorhea - Remembrance
Views: 120954 Karma Traveler
Supervising Scientist Protecting the Environment
 
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An educational presentation prepared in Kunwinjku for Traditional Owners and Aboriginal communities in the Alligator Rivers Region about the ways in which Supervising Scientist works to protect the environment from the potential impacts of uranium mining.
Views: 302 DeptEnvironment
Virginia Uranium Mining Pits Economic Gains Against Environmental Risks
 
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One of the largest uranium-ore deposits in the world, valued at about $7 billion, is located in an economically depressed, rural area of the southern U.S. state of Virginia. Regional activists have so far been able to block the company's efforts, though, to lift a ban on uranium mining in Virginia. VOA's Brian Padden has more.
Views: 1072 VOA News
World's Oldest Culture Under Threat From Uranium Mining
 
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Jabiluka: The Aboriginal Swindle (1997) Stunning footage of a threatened land reinforces the sadness felt for what could be lost if the Jabiluka mine project destroys a World heritage site. Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures The lure of Uranium has proved irresistible to successive Australian governments and Australia's Environment Minister has dismissed the Mirrar people's objections to the Jabiluka mine. This lucrative project could sever the Mirrar people’s spiritual links with the earth and the sights of sacred significance throughout the valley. "I was born in the bush" Yvonne Margarula tells us, "sleeping on the ground with the fire". Twice Academy Award nominated director, David Bradbury, explores the effects of this cultural devastation on the lives of a people and a land inextricably joined. For downloads and more information visit: https://www.journeyman.tv/film/514/jabiluka-the-aboriginal-swindle For similar stories, see: Are Australian Laws Biased Against Aborigines? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grXVww-lj6Y Counting the Cost of Australia's Coal Rush https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94Veuv22-zk The Mining Concession That Set Off An Indonesian Rebel Movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-0Log-170o Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures Frontline Films - Ref. 0514
Views: 5383 Journeyman Pictures
"A Slow Genocide of the People": Uranium Mining Leaves Toxic Nuclear Legacy on Indigenous Land
 
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http://www.democracynow.org - The iconic Grand Canyon is the site of a battle over toxic uranium mining. Last year, a company called Energy Fuels Resources was given federal approval to reopen a mine six miles from the Grand Canyon's popular South Rim entrance. A coalition of Native and environmental groups have protested the decision, saying uranium mining could strain scarce water sources and pose serious health effects. Diné (Navajo) tribal lands are littered with abandoned uranium mines. From 1944 to 1986, 3.9 million tons of uranium ore were chiseled and blasted from the mountains and plains of the region. More than 1,000 mines have closed, but the mining companies never properly disposed of their radioactive waste piles, leading to a spike in cancer rates and other health ailments. Broadcasting from Flagstaff, Arizona, we speak with Taylor McKinnon, director of energy with Grand Canyon Trust, and Klee Benally, a Diné (Navajo) activist and musician. "It's really a slow genocide of the people, not just indigenous people of this region, but it's estimated that there are over 10 million people who are residing within 50 miles of abandoned uranium mines," Benally says. Benally also describes the struggle to preserve the San Francisco Peaks, an area considered sacred by 13 Native tribes, where the Snowbowl ski resort is using treated sewage water to make snow. Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,200+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET at http://www.democracynow.org. Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today, visit http://owl.li/ruJ5Q. FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: @democracynow Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/democracynow Listen on SoundCloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/democracynow Daily Email News Digest: http://www.democracynow.org/subscribe Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DemocracyNow Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow Tumblr: http://democracynow.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/democracynow/
Views: 10651 Democracy Now!
Uranium Mining Impacts Pt. 1 of 3
 
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The International Forum on Globalization's Claire Greensfelder chairs a panel of indigenous and minority activists from around the world detailing the catastrophic impacts of uranium mining and the nuclear fuel cycle on their various cultures, people and ecosystems. From the American Southwest to Alaska; from Niger to Kazakhstan; from uranium mines in Australia and India to reprocessing plants in France, Japan and the State of Georgia, indigenous and minority communities testify to horrendous health and environmental devastation that shows the current industry push for a 'nuclear renaissance' to be nothing less than genocidal. For more info: www.dont-nuke-the-climate.org www.IFG.org www.DineCARE.org www.SortirDuNucleaire.fr
Views: 1412 eon3
Gabon:The impact of Areva's uranium mining
 
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Report - Gabon:The impact of Areva's uranium mining For 40 years Comuf, a subsidiary of French nuclear giant Areva, mined uranium in the town of Mounana, in southern Gabon. The operation has had serious consequences for the health of the workers and locals. Many former miners, both Gabonese and French, have died of lung cancer. Under pressure from NGOs, Areva opened a medical clinic last October. But the staff here don't all have the training or resources to properly diagnose diseases linked to uranium mining.
Views: 4362 FRANCE 24 English
Uranium mining could impact local water
 
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Uranium mining could impact local water
Views: 487 WAVY TV 10
Left in the Dust - uranium mining in Niger
 
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Uranium mining by French nuclear company AREVA poses a serious threat to the environment and people of northern Niger in West Africa
Greenpeace: Left in the Dust - Uranium Mining
 
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Uranium mining by French nuclear company AREVA poses a serious threat to the environment and people of northern Niger in West Africa.
Views: 2014 GreenTV
Uranium Toxicity, A Review of Occupational and Environmental Health
 
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This video is about Uranium Toxicity. Source material is from the ATDSR case studies. http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.asp?csem=16&po=0 Music by Moby "Homeward Angel (Long)" Tribute to Suzanne Collins "The Hunger Games."
Uranium Mining in US and Canada in the 1970s
 
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Physically removing the rock ore generally involves either open-pit mining or underground mining. Milling is the process that removes uranium from the ore, which is mostly obtained in open-pit and underground mines. Once at the mill, the ore is crushed and ground up, and treated with chemical solutions to dissolve the uranium, which is then recovered from the solution. Tailings are the wastes from the millings processes and are stored in mill tailings impoundments, a specially designed waste disposal facility. Since 1979, when uranium mine workers began being diagnosed with lung diseases, such as cancer, regulators have gradually tightened controls and mandated improved uranium mining practices. Recently, officials also have become concerned with the broader impacts of uranium mining on public health and the environment. Workers are directly exposed to the radiation hazards of uranium mines. Uranium mining also releases radon from the ground into the atmosphere. Mines and mining waste can release radionuclides, including radon, and other pollutants to streams, springs, and other bodies of water. Federal and state agencies have established pollutant discharge limits and drinking water standards, and continue to monitor these sites for public safety. Uranium mine waste from operations that closed before the mid-1970s are of particular concern. In many cases, these mines remain unclaimed and the waste is still piled near the mine. Weathering can lead to radioactive dust that is blown by the wind and the seepage of contaminants into the surface and groundwater. There are also cases of unclaimed uranium mine waste being used for house construction, which creates significant radon and radiation hazard for inhabitants. For more information on the hazards of uranium, go to USEPA website http://www.epa.gov/radtown/basic.html . This is clipped from the late 1970's BBC Production, Energy From The Crust, showing uranium mining activities and equipment and including footage from the following uranium mines: Schwartzwalder Mine, Near Boulder, Colorado King Solomon Mine near Uravan, Colorado and the Key Lake Mine in Saskatchewan, Canada. The entire film is available at the Internet Archive.
Views: 18461 markdcatlin
Energy Futures Series Seminar 1: Uranium Mining - Loren Setlow, EPA (Retired)
 
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The Global Green USA Security and Sustainability Program launched a Seminar Series titled "Energy Futures: Nuclear Power, Global Warming, and Nonproliferation." The first seminar of the series focused on the environmental impacts of uranium mining. Loren Setlow, is a retired Program Lead at the Environmental Protection Agency and discussed the government's role in uranium mining regulation.
Views: 146 Global Green USA
Jadugoda of Jharkhand: Side Effects of Dreams of becoming Nuclear Power (BBC Hindi)
 
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क्या झारखंड में यूरेनियम माइनिंग से आस-पास के इलाकों में रेडिएशन फैला? क्या ये भारत के न्यूक्लियर पावर के ख़िलाफ़ एक प्रोपेगैंडा है? बीबीसी हिंदी की ग्राउंड रिपोर्ट. वीडियो: सर्वप्रिया सांगवान/देबलिन रॉय तस्वीरें: शुभ्रजीत सेन
Views: 273138 BBC News Hindi
Namibian mining sparks environmental concerns
 
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Tourist operators are worried that a surge in uranium mining in the south-west African nation could cause environmental destruction and the loss of their livelihoods.
Uranium Mining and Radiation Effects on Workers (1960's)
 
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Views: 279 soli ken
Uranium Mining
 
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The health and environmental damage caused by uranium mining, narrated by Dr. Alex Rosen of IPPNW Germany.
Views: 377 IPPNW1
PLENARY 3 Uranium Mining, Health & The Environment: Pulling it Together
 
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Summary of workshops with Jim Harding (facilitator) (Canada) Retired professor, University of Regina THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 48 Uranium2015
Uranium Mining Leaves Toxic Nuclear Legacy on Indigenous Land
 
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The iconic Grand Canyon is the site of a battle over toxic uranium mining. Last year, a company called Energy Fuels Resources was given federal approval to reopen a mine six miles from the Grand Canyon's popular South Rim entrance. A coalition of Native and environmental groups have protested the decision, saying uranium mining could strain scarce water sources and pose serious health effects. Diné (Navajo) tribal lands are littered with abandoned uranium mines. From 1944 to 1986, 3.9 million tons of uranium ore were chiseled and blasted from the mountains and plains of the region. More than 1,000 mines have closed, but the mining companies never properly disposed of their radioactive waste piles, leading to a spike in cancer rates and other health ailments.
Views: 935 freespeechtv
Energy Futures Series Seminar 1  Uranium Mining   Loren Setlow, EPA Retired
 
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The Global Green USA Security and Sustainability Program launched a Seminar Series titled "Energy Futures: Nuclear Power, Global Warming, and Nonproliferation." The first seminar of the series focused on the environmental impacts of uranium mining. Loren Setlow, is a retired Program Lead at the Environmental Protection Agency and discussed the government's role in uranium mining regulation.
Views: 11 Global Green
No Significant Environmental Effects?
 
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Does mining really have "no significant environmental effects"? A short video by Alley Crawford with music ("PsychicActive Wind") by Perpetual Dream Theory (www.dreamtheory.net) and Gary Bourgeois. See http://www.miningwatch.ca/index.php?/... to order a DVD.
Views: 70 MythsandMirrors
South Africa's Toxic Mine Dumps (2009)
 
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Superdump: Toxic waste seeps into the environment from South African mine dumps. December 2009 For downloads and more information visit: http://journeyman.tv/59894/documentary-films-archive/superdump.html After 120 years of gold mining, the land and water on Gautengs far West Rand are some of the most polluted in the country. The mine dumps that dot the area west of Johannesburg have been identified as public health risks. One of the biggest problems is uranium seeping into the watercourses, turning the sediment both poisonous and radioactive. Ecologists, the community and the mines all agree that the mine dumps must go. But no-one can agree what to do with them. This edition of Special Assignment takes a look at community resistance against two proposals to reprocess the mine dumps and relocate the resulting waste. Communities are clashing with the mines over two proposed superdumps mega-mine dumps proposed for Fochville and Randfontein. Should these communities suffer for the health of the entire region? And what impact will these superdumps have on food security? SABC - Ref. 4564 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 5085 Journeyman Pictures
Curse of Uranium Mining - A Headlines Today Expose
 
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This video report from "Headlines Today/Aaj Tak" 12/12/2004 exposes the harsh reality of the people being affected by the operation of uranium mining in and around Jadugoda being run By Uranium Corporation Of India, Government of India Limited(UCIL) . Although the company claims radiation stories as " myths ", Headlines Today documents the evidence where the entire environment, community and the future generation has been put to risk by the sheer negligence of the company.
Views: 259 raiot webzine
'Buffoons mining & buffoons regulating': Radioactive spill at Ranger uranium mine, Kakadu
 
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'Buffoons mining & buffoons regulating' 8/12/13 The operator of the Ranger mine in the Northern Territory says a spill of uranium and acid has been contained on the site and there will be no impact to the environment.
Views: 1888 Greenshack Dotinfo
Devastating impact uranium mining continues to have on Native lands
 
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Further informations about topics addressed are available in favourites, play lists on this, my main channel http://www.youtube.com/user/sundrumify and complementary video responses. Published with the permission of "DemocracyNow.org DemocracyNow.org - New Mexico's long history of uranium mining on Native American lands provides fuel for the front end of the nuclear industry and stores much of the mine tailings and radioactive waste from nuclear weapons and power plants. We look at the devastating impact uranium mining continues to have on Native lands with Leona Morgan of Eastern Navajo Diné Against Uranium Mining, a group dedicated to protecting the water, air, land and health of communities in areas impacted by uranium mines. We're also joined by Jay Coghlan of Nuclear Watch New Mexico and former Los Alamos National Laboratory investigator Chuck Montaño. To watch the entire weekday independent news hour, read the transcript, download the podcast, search our vast archive, or to find more information about Democracy Now! and Amy Goodman, visit http://www.democracynow.org.
Views: 1082 GeneratorJun
WUS2015 Black magic? Health issues & Jadugoda uranium mines in India
 
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SHAKEEL UR RAHMAN (INDIA) Indian Doctors for Peace and Development SHRI PRAKASH (INDIA) National Award winning filmmaker Film maker from the uranium mining area Jadugoda THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 268 Uranium2015
Energy Futures Series Seminar 1: Uranium Mining - Caitlin Doughty .m4v
 
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The Global Green USA Security and Sustainability Program launched a Seminar Series titled "Energy Futures: Nuclear Power, Global Warming, and Nonproliferation." The first seminar of the series focused on the environmental impacts of uranium mining. Caitlin Doughty is a research intern at Global Green who discusses international uranium mining.
Views: 113 Global Green USA
"Radioactive Death" Human Exposure and Risk
 
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The Center for World Indigenous Studies (www.cwis.org) is conducting a two-year Radiation Risk Assessment Action Research Project to evaluate the extended health, cultural and environmental effects of 70 years of nuclear bomb detonations, uranium mining and radiation and toxic chemical storage at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State near five American Indian territories.
Views: 60 Rudolph Rÿser
WUS2015  Notions of Radioactivity and Issues of Uranium Mining Sites in Germany
 
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GORDON EDWARDS (CANADA, QC) Ph.D., mathematician/physicist, president of the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility GUNTER WIPPEL (GERMANY) Cofounder of Uranium Network and co-organizer of the first World Uranium Hearings (Austria, 1992) THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium will address issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium is organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future ofnuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 43 Uranium2015
Environment Impact Assessment Part 1
 
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Support us : https://www.instamojo.com/@exambin/ Download our app : http://examb.in/app Environmental Impact Assessment Developmental projects in the past were undertaken without any consideration to their environmental consequences. As a result the whole environment got polluted and degraded. In view of the colossal damage done to the environment, governments and public are now concerned about the environmental impacts of developmental activities. So, to assess the environmental impacts, the mechanism of Environmental Impact Assessment also known as EIA was introduced. EIA is a tool to anticipate the likely environmental impacts that may arise out of the proposed developmental activities and suggest measures and strategies to reduce them. EIA was introduced in India in 1978, with respect to river valley projects. Later the EIA legislation was enhanced to include other developmental sections since 1941. EIA comes under Notification on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of developmental projects 1994 under the provisions of Environment (Protection) Act, 1986. Besides EIA, the Government of India under Environment (Protection) Act 1986 issued a number of other notifications, which are related to environmental impact assessment. EIA is now mandatory for 30 categories of projects, and these projects get Environmental Clearance (EC) only after the EIA requirements are fulfilled. Environmental clearance or the ‘go ahead’ signal is granted by the Impact Assessment Agency in the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. Projects that require clearance from central government can be broadly categorized into the following sectors • Industries • Mining • Thermal power plants • River valley projects • Infrastructure • Coastal Regulation Zone and • Nuclear power projects The important aspects of EIA are risk assessment, environmental management and Post product monitoring. Functions of EIA is to 1. Serve as a primary environmental tool with clear provisions. 2. Apply consistently to all proposals with potential environmental impacts. 3. Use scientific practice and suggest strategies for mitigation. 4. Address all possible factors such as short term, long term, small scale and large scale effects. 5. Consider sustainable aspects such as capacity for assimilation, carrying capacity, biodiversity protection etc... 6. Lay down a flexible approach for public involvement 7. Have a built-in mechanism of follow up and feedback. 8. Include mechanisms for monitoring, auditing and evaluation. In order to carry out an environmental impact assessment, the following are essential: 1. Assessment of existing environmental status. 2. Assessment of various factors of ecosystem (air, water, land, biological). 3. Analysis of adverse environmental impacts of the proposed project to be started. 4. Impact on people in the neighborhood. Benefits of EIA • EIA provides a cost effective method to eliminate or minimize the adverse impact of developmental projects. • EIA enables the decision makers to analyses the effect of developmental activities on the environment well before the developmental project is implemented. • EIA encourages the adaptation of mitigation strategies in the developmental plan. • EIA makes sure that the developmental plan is environmentally sound and within limits of the capacity of assimilation and regeneration of the ecosystem. • EIA links environment with development. The goal is to ensure environmentally safe and sustainable development. Environmental Components of EIA: The EIA process looks into the following components of the environment: • Air environment • Noise component : • Water environment • Biological environment • Land environment EIA Process and Procedures Steps in Preparation of EIA report • Collection of baseline data from primary and secondary sources; • Prediction of impacts based on past experience and mathematical modelling; • Evolution of impacts versus evaluation of net cost benefit; • Preparation of environmental management plans to reduce the impacts to the minimum; • Quantitative estimation of financial cost of monitoring plan and the mitigation measures. Environment Management Plan • Delineation of mitigation measures including prevention and control for each environmental component, rehabilitation and resettlement plan. EIA process: EIA process is cyclical with interaction between the various steps. 1. Screening 2. Scoping 3. Collection of baseline data 4. Impact prediction 5. Mitigation measures and EIA report 6. Public hearing 7. Decision making 8. Assessment of Alternatives, Delineation of Mitigation Measures and Environmental Impact Assessment Report 9. Risk assessment
Views: 24288 Exambin
Donna Dillman (CCAMU): Hunger Strike 2007 - ecoSanity.org
 
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CCAMU TO HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS ON URANIUM MINING - DILLMAN TO END HUNGER STRIKE Thursday, December 13, 2007 The Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium (CCAMU) announced today that they would hold public hearings throughout Eastern Ontario in the New Year on the environmental and health impacts of uranium mining. "We have been asking the government to hold an inquiry into uranium mining and they have failed to respond" said Wolfe Erlichman of CCAMU. "In the absence of action, on behalf of the McGuinty government, we are going to hold a citizen's inquiry and invite the Premier to attend. We will even go to his home town to accommodate him." A number of NGO's including Greenpeace, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, David Suzuki Foundation, Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, Voice of Women and Sierra Club of Canada have endorsed the hearings or will participate as expert witnesses. CCAMU will be calling for public and expert submissions to take place at hearings to be held in Kingston, Ottawa and Peterborough in February/March. In response to the hearings, Donna Dillman, who has not eaten since October 8th 2007, said she will end her hunger strike. "I began this hunger strike to shine a light on the problem of uranium mining in eastern Ontario with the hope that Premier McGuinty would call a moratorium on further mining and exploration" said Dillman. "We have not yet got a moratorium but these hearings are a great opportunity to inform and educate Ontarians about some of the detrimental effects of uranium mining and to keep the pressure on the McGuinty government." "Donna has made an incredible personal sacrifice in pushing for this moratorium. It is time for the environmental community to take some of the heavy lifting from Donna before she suffers any serious health impacts" said Gideon Foreman, Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment. "These hearings will be an opportunity to further expose the unfolding economic, health and environmental disaster associated with the global nuclear agenda" said Bruce Cox, Executive Director of Greenpeace Canada. "Mr. McGuinty is wrong when he says we need to mine uranium here to keep the lights on. This uranium is bound for export." Donna Dillman had not eaten since October 8th, 2007-a full 68 days ago. Ms. Dillman has been calling on Premier McGuinty to announce a moratorium on further mining and exploration in Eastern Ontario until a full public inquiry on the health and environmental impacts of uranium mining can take place. On Tuesday of this week Ms. Dillman stopped drinking juices and had been surviving solely on water. She ate her first bite of food in front of the supporters who had gathered in MPP Peter Tabuns' office, just after the press conference held in the Queen's Park press gallery. Four other women, Adriana Mugnatto-Hamu, Rita Bijons, Sharon Howarth and Karen Buck, had joined Dillman on her hunger strike this past Tuesday, to show their solidarity. They broke their fast today, just after Dillman ate a small amount of mashed squash. Contact: Lynn Daniluk Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium [email protected]
Views: 1173 climateye
Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste?
 
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This documentary examines the environmental impact of that the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada have had on the environment. director, editor, narrator: Arthur Pequegnat
Views: 485 Arthur YUL
Energy Futures Series Seminar 1: Uranium Mining - Geoffrey Fettus, Natural Resources Defense Council
 
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The Global Green USA Security and Sustainability Program launched a Seminar Series titled "Energy Futures: Nuclear Power, Global Warming, and Nonproliferation." The first seminar of the series focused on the environmental impacts of uranium mining. Geoffrey Fettus, is the Senior Project Attorney for the Nuclear Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council and discussed the legal complexities surrounding uranium mining laws.
Views: 294 Global Green USA
Uranium Mining Pollutes Drinking Water
 
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Art Dohman, Chairman of the Goliad County Uranium Research Advisory Committee, describes pollution in local drinking water aquifers caused by uranium mining in Texas.
Views: 3554 UraniumInfo
WE ARE THE LAND, Uranium Mining in the Black Hills
 
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"WE ARE THE LAND, Uranium Mining in the Black Hills" A new documentary film from Christopher Crosby Produced by PK Productions LLC and the Institute of Range and American Mustang. ABOUT "WE ARE THE LAND" - Governments and the uranium industry say the mining and milling of uranium provides high-paying and much-needed jobs in some of the most remote areas of the country, with manageable environmental risks. But it's an industry that has long attracted its share of controversy. This is a major concern for the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary in western South Dakota, and other residents including environmental and conservation groups. The Sierra Club of South Dakota warns that water pollution will be a major concern if the mining company Powertech is given a permit to mine for uranium. The Sierra Club's Black Hills Group, says there's a high likelihood that aquifers will become polluted if an injection-well recovery system is used to mine the ore. Powertech Inc USA has submitted its uranium mining application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and it can be viewed at the NRC website. The NRC has announced a time period for interested individuals to voice their concerns regarding the uranium mine's impacts to the environment. This proposed uranium mine will be the first time folks can be heard under the new GEIS. "It's going to be my last great battle, but I'm going to win this one." says Hyde. The Institute of Range and American Mustang owns 13,000 acres of private land dedicated to range preservation and a balanced ecosystem. I.R.A.M.'s finest gift is The Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary, whose purpose is to provide not only freedom for unadoptable and unwanted wild horses, but also a research area dedicated to solving wild horse herd management that will contribute to the well-being of wild horses everywhere. http://www.wildmustangs.com Dayton O. Hyde, Founder and President Institute of Range and the American Mustang. Dayton Hyde is a rancher, conservationist, award winning photographer, essayist and author of 17 books; He runs the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary, an 13,000-acre ranch in Western South Dakota where he protects wild horses. About the Production: Director / Editor: Christopher Crosby Producers: Karla R. LaRive, Susan Watt Featuring, Tom Ballanco, Tom Cook, Dayton O. Hyde, Barbara High Pine Peltier, Virgil Red Cloud Goode, Gilbert Sanchez, Susan Watt and Windwalker. Music soundtrack by Windwalker, Edoal Spirit Buffalo (Wind Spirit Drum), Virgil Red Cloud Goode, Barbara High Pine Peltier, Christopher Crosby, Martin Meyer. Recorded and engineered at Great Sky Studios, Hot Springs South Dakota. June 2010 Filmed on location at the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary, South Dakota, USA. Contact information for the Sanctuary: Susan Watt, Program Development Director Institute of Range and the American Mustang PO Box 998, Hot Springs South Dakota 57747 [email protected] http://www.wildmustangs.com Public Relations for WE ARE THE LAND: Karla LaRive | Studio West Management PO Box 752, Hot Springs, South Dakota 57747 http://www.studiowestmanagement.com ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2011
Views: 3682 Christopher Crosby
WUS2015 Community & uranium mining issues in Africa
 
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PEER DE RIJK (NETHERLANDS) International executive director, World Information Service on Energy (WISE) BRUNO CHAREYRON (FRANCE) Nuclear physic engineer, director of the CRIIRAD laboratory MAMADOU DIALLO (MALI) Member of the Association of Citizens and Friends of Faléa Commune (ARACF) DAVID BAYANG (CAMEROON ) Deputy National Coordinator, National Service for Justice and Peace THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 168 Uranium2015
Water Quality and Uranium Mining
 
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Paul Robinson discusses the potential impacts to water quality from uranium mining.
Views: 480 VCNVAORG
WUS 2015 : Radon health effects & uranium effects on maternity care
 
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MICHAEL DWORKIND (CANANDA, QC) Physician, associate professor for Family Medicine McGill University, member of Physicians for Global Survival MICHELLE GIN (USA) Coordinator, Student’s Association of Physicians for Social Responsibility, University of Minnesota THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium will address issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium is organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future ofnuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 234 Uranium2015
Energy Futures Series Seminar 1: Uranium Mining - Marina Voronova-Abrams, Global Green USA.m4v
 
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The Global Green USA Security and Sustainability Program launched a Seminar Series titled "Energy Futures: Nuclear Power, Global Warming, and Nonproliferation." The first seminar of the series focused on the environmental impacts of uranium mining. Marina Voronova-Abrams is a Program Associate with Global Green USA and discussed uranium mining in Central Asia.
Views: 154 Global Green USA
Uranium Drive-In - New Day Films - Environment & Sustainability - Health
 
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Uranium Drive-In follows a proposed uranium mill in southwestern Colorado -- the first to be built in the U.S. in 30 years -- and the emotional debate pitting a population desperate for jobs and financial stability against an environmental group based in nearby a resort town. Without judgment, both sides of the issue are brought to life in heart-wrenching detail as the film follows conflicting visions for the future. The film offers no easy answers but aims instead to capture personal stories and paint a portrait of the lives behind this nuanced and complex issue.
Views: 287 New Day Films
Olympic Dam mine expansion- Environmental impacts of tailings & water by Dr Gavin Mudd - Pt 3
 
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http://cuttlefishcountry.com BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam mine is massive and destined to become the biggest open cut mine in the world. Naturally, with massive mines come massive impacts... environmentally, socially and economically. Widely published environmental engineer Dr Gavin Mudd (Monash University) gives this presentation on the impact the mining operation will have from the desert to the sea, and beyond through the export of dangerous radioactive materials. Tailings dams will leak radioactive waste into the earth in the South Australian desert, the water drawn from the Great Artesian Basin will continue to dry natural mound springs, threaten pastoral and agricultural bores and endanger arid zone ecology and indigenous sacred sites. Dr Gavin Mudd delivered this presentation in Adelaide, South Australia on October 9th, 2011... the day before the mega-mine project received environmental approval from both State and Federal Governments. You can find out more at http://cuttlefishcountry.com
Views: 573 danimations
WUS2015 Uranium mining and health issues in the USA
 
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DOUG BRUGGE (USA) Professor, Tufts University Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Co-editor of “The Navajo People and Uranium Mining” LEONA MORGAN (USA) Leona Morgan, Dene No Nukes, former coordinator Eastern Navajo Dine Against Uranium Mining THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 166 Uranium2015
Energy Futures Series Seminar 1: Uranium Mining - Lauren Pagel EARTHWORKS .m4v
 
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The Global Green USA Security and Sustainability Program launched a Seminar Series titled "Energy Futures: Nuclear Power, Global Warming, and Nonproliferation." The first seminar of the series focused on the environmental impacts of uranium mining. Lauren Pagel is the Policy Director for EARTHWORKS and discussed the history of uranium mining in the United States.
Views: 178 Global Green USA
Protest PIELC - No Panel on Fukushima's Effects on the Environment!!
 
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The Public Interest Environmental Law Conference did have one panel on the uranium mining hazards and the abuses they perpetrate. Please subscribe to my channel! Please follow my radio show: The Age of Fission on www.ucy.tv/aof every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 8 am – 9 am pst. Look on my Playlists and share the other two books I read by Dr. Gofman: “Population Control Through Nuclear Pollution” and “Poisoned Power” (Playlists of the same names.) We all must understand the real facts about nuclear contamination and it’s negative effects on our lives. Donna Gilmore has put together a very useful website for everyone to become actively engaged in stopping the continued cover up of mismanagement and contamination by the nuclear industry. http://sanonofresafety.org/ Mimi German has gotten a “Citizen’s Lab” where they can test soil for radioactive isotopes: https://www.radcast.org/ BOTH OF THESE TWO SITES PROVIDE GREAT USEFUL INFORMATION THAT WE ALL NEED TO UTILIZE.
Views: 42 nutzforart