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Largest Craters In The Solar System
 
02:49
Thanks for watching..... Body Crater Diameter ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. Mercury Caloris Basin 1,550 km (963 mi) 2. Mercury Rembrandt 715 km (444 mi) 3. Venus Mead 280 km (170 mi) 4. Earth Vredefort 250–300 km (160–190 mi) 5. Moon Procellarum Basin 3,000 km (1,900 mi) Not confirmed as an impact basin. 6. Moon South Pole–Aitken basin 2,500 km (1,600 mi) 7. Moon Mare Imbrium 1,145 km (711 mi) 8. Mars North Polar Basin 10,600 × 8,500 km (6,550 × 5,250 mi) Not confirmed as an impact basin 9. Mars Hellas Planitia 2,300 km (1,400 mi) 10.Mars Utopia Planitia 3,300 km (2,100 mi) 11. Vesta Rheasilvia 505 km (310 mi) 12. Vesta Veneneia 395 km (250 mi) 13. Ganymede (Jupiter) Epigeus 343 km (213 mi) 14. Callisto (Jupiter) Valhalla 360 km (224 mi) 15. Callisto (Jupiter) Heimdall 210 km (130 mi) 16. Mimas (Saturn) Herschel 139 km (86 mi) 17. Tethys (Saturn) Odysseus 445 km (277 mi) 18. Dione (Saturn) Evander 350 km (220 mi) 19. Rhea (Saturn) Mamaldi 480 km (300 mi) 20. Rhea (Saturn) Tirawa 360 km (220 mi) 21. Titan (Saturn) Menrva 392 km (244 mi) 22. Iapetus (Saturn) Turgis 580 km (360 mi) 23. Iapetus (Saturn) Engelier 504 km (313 mi) 24. Iapetus (Saturn) Gerin 445 km (277 mi) 25. Iapetus (Saturn) Falsaron 424 km (263 mi) 26. Titania (Uranus) Gertrude 326 km (203 mi) Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_largest_craters_in_the_Solar_System An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Although the Earth’s active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 170 terrestrial impact craters have been identified. These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation were witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents. Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into the Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 4050 KnownUnknowns
What is IMPACT CRATER? What does IMPACT CRATER mean? IMPACT CRATER meaning & explanation
 
04:15
What is IMPACT CRATER? What does IMPACT CRATER mean? IMPACT CRATER meaning - IMPACT CRATER definition - IMPACT CRATER explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon, or other solid body in the Solar System or elsewhere, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Although Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on Earth, impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. The rate of crater production on Earth has since been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Although Earth's active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 190 terrestrial impact craters have been identified. These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation was witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents. Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that may appear similar, including calderas, sinkholes, glacial cirques, ring dikes, salt domes, and others.
Views: 275 The Audiopedia
Most Amazing Impact Craters in United States
 
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Thanks for watching.... 1. Ames Oklahoma 16 2. Avak Alaska 12 3. Barringer Arizona 1.19 4. Beaverhead Idaho, Montana 60 5. Calvin Michigan 8.5 6. Chesapeake Bay Virginia 90 7. Cloud Creek Wyoming 7 8. Crooked Creek Missouri 7 9. Decaturville Missouri 6 10. Des Plaines Illinois 8 11. Flynn Creek Tennessee 3.8 12. Glasford Illinois 4 13. Glover Bluff Wisconsin 8 14. Haviland Kansas 15. Kentland Indiana 13 16. Manson Iowa 35 17. Marquez Texas 12.7 18. Middlesboro Kentucky 6 19. Newporte North Dakota 3.2 20. Odessa Texas 0.168 21. Red Wing North Dakota 9 22. Rock Elm Wisconsin 6 23. Santa Fe New Mexico 6-13 24. Serpent Mound Ohio 8 25. Sierra Madera Texas 13 26. Upheaval Dome Utah 10 27. Wells Creek Tennessee 12 28. Wetumpka Alabama 7.6 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_North_America An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Although the Earth’s active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 170 terrestrial impact craters have been identified. These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation were witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents. Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into the Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 4564 KnownUnknowns
Most Amazing Impact Craters in Canada
 
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Thanks for watching.... 1. Bow City Alberta 2. Brent Ontario 3.8 3. Carswell Saskatchewan 39 4. Charlevoix Quebec 54 5. Corossol Quebec 4 6. Couture Quebec 8 7. Deep Bay Saskatchewan 13 8. Eagle Butte Alberta 10 9. Elbow Saskatchewan 8 10. Gow Saskatchewan 4 11. Haughton Devon Island, Nunavut 23 12. Holleford Ontario 2.35 13. Île Rouleau Quebec 4 14. La Moinerie Quebec 8 15. Lac à l'Eau Claire Est Clearwater East Quebec 26 16. Lac à l'Eau Claire Ouest Clearwater West Quebec 36 17. Manicouagan Quebec 100 18. Maple Creek Saskatchewan 6 19. Mistastin Labrador 28 20. Montagnais Nova Scotia 45 21. Nicholson Northwest Territories 12.5 22. Pilot Northwest Territories 6 23. Pingualuit formerly Chubb and Nouveau-Québec Quebec 3.44 24. Presqu'île Quebec 24 25. Prince Albert Northwest Territories 25 26. Saint Martin Manitoba 40 27. Slate Islands Ontario 30 about 450 28. Steen River Alberta 25 29. Sudbury Ontario 250 30. Viewfield Saskatchewan 2.5 31. Wanapitei Ontario 7.5 32. West Hawk Manitoba 2.44 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_North_America An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 12047 KnownUnknowns
Impact crater - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
03:04
|- |Impact craters in the Solar System: |} An "impact crater" is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon, or other solid body in the Solar System or elsewhere, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. The rate of crater production on Earth has since been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact+crater, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 419 Wiz Science™
Most Amazing Impact Craters in Australia
 
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Thanks for watching.... 1. Acraman South Australia 90 2. Amelia Creek Northern Territory 20 3. Boxhole Northern Territory 0.17 4. Connolly Basin Western Australia 9 5. Crawford South Australia 8.5 6. Dalgaranga Western Australia 0.024 7. Flaxman South Australia 10 8. Foelsche Northern Territory 6 9. Glikson Western Australia 19 10. Goat Paddock Western Australia 5.1 11. Gosses Bluff Northern Territory 22 12. Goyder Northern Territory 3 13. Henbury Northern Territory 0.157 14. Kelly West Northern Territory 10 15. Lawn Hill Queensland 18 16. Liverpool Northern Territory 1.6 17. Mount Toondina South Australia 4 18. Piccaninny Western Australia 7 19. Shoemaker (was Teague) Western Australia 30 20. Spider Western Australia 13 21. Strangways Northern Territory 25 22. Tookoonooka Queensland 55 23. Veevers Western Australia 0.08 24. Wolfe Creek Western Australia 0.875 25. Woodleigh Western Australia 60–120 26. Yarrabubba Western Australia 30 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_Australia An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse,[2] impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain.[3] Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth.[4] The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average.[5][6] This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system.[7] Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.[7] Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System.[8] Although the Earth’s active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 170 terrestrial impact craters have been identified.[9] These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation were witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents.[10] Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into the Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 4816 KnownUnknowns
Most Amazing Impact Craters in Africa
 
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Thanks for watching..... 1. Amguid Algeria 2. Aorounga Chad 3. Aouelloul Mauritania 4. BP Structure Libya 5. Bosumtwi Ghana 6. Gweni-Fada Chad 7. Kalkkop South Africa 8. Kamil Egypt 9. Kgagodi Botswana 10. Luizi DRC 11. Morokweng South Africa 12. Oasis Libya 13. Ouarkziz Algeria 14. Roter Kamm Namibia 15. Talemzane Algeria 16. Tenoumer Mauritania 17. Tin Bider Algeria 18. Tswaing South Africa 19. Vredefort South Africa Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_Africa An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Although the Earth’s active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 170 terrestrial impact craters have been identified. These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation were witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents. Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into the Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 1495 KnownUnknowns
Most Amazing Impact Craters in Europe
 
04:10
Thanks for watching.... 1. Boltysh Ukraine 24 65.17 ± 0.64 million 2. Dellen Sweden 19 89.0 ± 2.7 million 3. Dobele Latvia 4.5 290 ± 35 million 4. Gardnos Norway 5 500 ± 10 million 5. Granby Sweden 3 470 million (approx.) 6. Guarda Portugal 30 200 million (approx.) 7. Gusev Russia 3 49.0 ± 0.2 million 8. Ilumetsa Estonia 0.08 6600 (at least) 9. Ilyinets Ukraine 8.5 378 ± 5 million 10. Iso-Naakkima Finland 3 1000 million (at least) 11. Yanisyarvi Russia 14 700 ± 5 million 12. Kaali Estonia 0.11 km (largest of 9) 3000...5000 13. Kaluga Russia 15 380 ± 5 million 14. Kamensk Russia 25 49.0 ± 0.2 million 15. Kärdla Estonia 4 455 million (approx.) 16. Karikkoselkä Finland 1.4 230 million (approx.) 17. Karla Russia 10 5 ± 1 million 18. Keurusselkä Finland 30 1800 million (at most) 19. Kursk Russia 6 250 ± 80 million 20. Lappajärvi Finland 23 73.3 ± 5.3 million 21. Lockne Sweden 7.5 455 million 22. Logoisk Belarus 15 42.3 ± 1.1 million 23. Lumparn Finland 9 1000 million (approx.) 24. Mien Sweden 9 121.0 ± 2.3 million 25. Mishina Gora Russia 2.5 300 ± 50 million 26. Mizarai Lithuania 5 500 ± 20 million 27. Mjølnir Barents Sea, Norway 40 142.0 ± 2.6 million 28. Morasko Poland 0.10 km (largest of 7) 5,000 (approx.) 29. Neugrund Estonia 8 470 million (approx.) 30. Nördlinger Ries Germany 25 14.8 million 31. Obolon' Ukraine 20 169 ± 7 million 32. Paasselkä Finland 10 1800 million (at most) 33. Puchezh-Katunki Nizhny Novgorod, Russia 80 167 ± 3 million 34. Rochechouart France 23 214 ± 8 million 35. Rotmistrovka Ukraine 2.7 120 ± 10 million 36. Saarijärvi Finland 1.5 600 million (at least) 37. Siljan Sweden 52 376.8 ± 1.7 million 38. Steinheim Germany 3.8 15 ± 1 million 39. Suavjärvi Russia 16 2400 million (approx.) 40. Suvasvesi North Finland 4 1000 million (at most) 41. Sääksjärvi Finland 6 560 million (approx.) 42. Söderfjärden Finland 6.6 600 million (approx.) 43. Ternovka Ukraine 11 280 ± 10 million 44. Tvären Sweden 2 455 million (approx.) 45. Vepriai Lithuania 8 160 ± 10 million (at least) 46. Zapadnaya Ukraine 3.2 165 ± 5 million 47. Zeleny Gai Ukraine 3.5 80 ± 20 million Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_Europe An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 4474 KnownUnknowns
Most Amazing Impact Craters in South America
 
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Thanks for watching... 1. Araguainha Brazil 40 km 2. Campo del Cielo Argentina 0.05 km 3. Monturaqui Chile 0.46 km 4. Riachão Ring Brazil 4.5 km 5. Rio Cuarto Argentina 4.5 km (largest of 10) 6. Serra da Cangalha Brazil 12 km 7. Vargeão Dome Brazil 12 km 8. Vista Alegre Brazil 9.5 km 9. Iturralde Bolivia 8 km Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_South_America An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Although the Earth’s active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 170 terrestrial impact craters have been identified. These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation were witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents. Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into the Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Daniel Barringer (1860–1929) was one of the first to identify an impact crater, Meteor Crater in Arizona; to crater specialists the site is referred to as Barringer Crater in his honor. Initially Barringer's ideas were not widely accepted, and even when the origin of Meteor Crater was finally acknowledged, the wider implications for impact cratering as a significant geological process on Earth were not. In the 1920s, the American geologist Walter H. Bucher studied a number of sites now recognized as impact craters in the USA. He concluded they had been created by some great explosive event, but believed that this force was probably volcanic in origin. However, in 1936, the geologists John D. Boon and Claude C. Albritton Jr. revisited Bucher's studies and concluded that the craters that he studied were probably formed by impacts. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 1171 KnownUnknowns
Most Amazing Impact Craters in Asia
 
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Thanks for watching...... 1. Beyenchime-Salaatin Russia 8 2. Bigach Kazakhstan 8 3. Chiyli Kazakhstan 5.5 4. Chukcha Russia 6 5. El'gygytgyn Russia 18 6. Kara Russia 65 7. Karakul Tajikistan 52 8. Logancha Russia 20 9. Lonar Buldhana, India 1.83 10. Macha Russia 0.3 11. Popigai Siberia, Russia 100 12. Ragozinka Russia 9 13. Shunak Kazakhstan 2.8 14. Sikhote-Alin Primorsky Krai, Russia 0.026 15. Sobolev Russia 0.053 16. Tabun-Khara-Obo Mongolia 1.3 17. Wabar Saudi Arabia 0.116 18. Zhamanshin Kazakhstan 14 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_impact_craters_in_Asia An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon or other solid body in the Solar System, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body with the surface. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on the Earth. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids. On other planets and moons that experience more active surface geological processes, such as Earth, Venus, Mars, Europa, Io and Titan, visible impact craters are less common because they become eroded, buried or transformed by tectonics over time. Where such processes have destroyed most of the original crater topography, the terms impact structure or astrobleme are more commonly used. In early literature, before the significance of impact cratering was widely recognised, the terms cryptoexplosion or cryptovolcanic structure were often used to describe what are now recognised as impact-related features on Earth. The cratering records of very old surfaces, such as Mercury, the Moon, and the southern highlands of Mars, record a period of intense early bombardment in the inner Solar System around 3.9 billion years ago. Since that time, the rate of crater production on Earth has been considerably lower, but it is appreciable nonetheless; Earth experiences from one to three impacts large enough to produce a 20 km diameter crater about once every million years on average. This indicates that there should be far more relatively young craters on the planet than have been discovered so far. The cratering rate in the inner solar system fluctuates as a consequence of collisions in the asteroid belt that create a family of fragments that are often sent cascading into the inner solar system. Formed in a collision 160 million years ago, the Baptistina family of asteroids is thought to have caused a large spike in the impact rate, perhaps causing the Chicxulub impact that may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Note that the rate of impact cratering in the outer Solar System could be different from the inner Solar System. Although the Earth’s active surface processes quickly destroy the impact record, about 170 terrestrial impact craters have been identified. These range in diameter from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km, and they range in age from recent times (e.g. the Sikhote-Alin craters in Russia whose creation were witnessed in 1947) to more than two billion years, though most are less than 500 million years old because geological processes tend to obliterate older craters. They are also selectively found in the stable interior regions of continents. Few undersea craters have been discovered because of the difficulty of surveying the sea floor, the rapid rate of change of the ocean bottom, and the subduction of the ocean floor into the Earth's interior by processes of plate tectonics. Impact craters are not to be confused with landforms that in some cases appear similar, including calderas and ring dikes. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_crater
Views: 818 KnownUnknowns
Meteoroid
 
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A meteoroid is a small rocky or metallic body travelling through space. Meteoroids are significantly smaller than asteroids, and range in size from small grains to 1 meter-wide objects. Smaller objects than this are classified as micrometeoroids or space dust. Most are fragments from comets or asteroids, while others are collision impact debris ejected from bodies such as the Moon or Mars. When such an object enters the Earth's atmosphere at a speed typically in excess of 20 km/s, aerodynamic heating produces a streak of light, both from the glowing object and the trail of glowing particles that it leaves in its wake. This phenomenon is called a meteor, or colloquially a "shooting star" or "falling star". A series of many meteors appearing seconds or minutes apart, and appearing to originate from the same fixed point in the sky, is called a meteor shower. Incoming objects larger than several meters (asteroids or comets) can explode in the air. If a meteoroid, comet or asteroid or a piece thereof withstands ablation from its atmospheric entry and impacts with the ground, then it is called a meteorite. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 52 Audiopedia
Serpent Mound ~ The Largest And Finest Effigy Mound In The USA
 
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Truly a site to behold, the Great Serpent Mound in southwest Ohio is the worlds largest serpentine effigy mound yet discovered. Writhing in a seemingly effortless way, the mound winds through trees on a cliff overlooking the Brush Creek valley of Adams County. The Great Serpent Mound of southwest Ohio averages about 1330 feet in length and 3 feet in height. Representing an unwinding serpent, the mound is sheathed in mystery and controversy. The serpent is thought by most to be about to swallow an egg. However many theories abound suggesting various interpretations. For instance some think it may represent an eclipse. The mysteries don't stop there. The very ground where the mound rests is also of interest to archeology. Seemingly full of cave-like or hollow structures, it is thought that perhaps there may be more to this serpent resting underground. Conical mounds found nearby contained burials and implements that are characteristic of the prehistoric Adena people (800 BC-AD 100). Due to very acidic soil and predominant rainfall, many cave like structures reside underground. It is presumed that the Adena people may have resided in the caves. If true, there could be a treasure trove of artifacts waiting to be discovered. In 1933 W.H. Bucher published an account of the area calling it a cryptovolcanic structure. Bucher saw similarities in the land forms at the Serpent Mound to barely recognizable volcanic upheavals in Germany. However, no volcanic materials have been found there. In 1947 R.D. Dietz in Science magazine suggested that a better name to describe the land features was "cryptoexplosion"—the folded and faulted beds of landforms from different geologic eras exposed from the impact of meteors. There is a great appeal to Dietz' theory even if the geology does not completely support it; there is no meteoric metal here. There are serious suggestions that the serpent is intimately connected with the heavens. Several writers have suggested that the serpent is a model of the constellation we call the Little Dipper, its tail coiled about the north star. It is tempting to believe that the Indians knew of the meteor's explosion into the earth, and they built the mound to honor that event. Bucher's theory suggests a different tern of events. The explosion came from within the earth from the incredible pressure of accumulated but repressed energies, trapped, blocked, but finally exploding upward as gas forcing its way to be released through the body of the earth toward the sky above. If there was ever a collective earth--memory recognizing the release of what the Hindus call Kundalini, this is it.
Impact crater
 
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Views: 0 Trivia