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Theory and Practice of Cryptography
 
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Google Tech Talks December, 19 2007 Topics include: Introduction to Modern Cryptography, Using Cryptography in Practice and at Google, Proofs of Security and Security Definitions and A Special Topic in Cryptography This talk is one in a series hosted by Google University: Wednesdays, 11/28/07 - 12/19/07 from 1-2pm Speaker: Steve Weis Steve Weis received his PhD from the Cryptography and Information Security group at MIT, where he was advised by Ron Rivest. He is a member of Google's Applied Security (AppSec) team and is the technical lead for Google's internal cryptographic library, KeyMaster.
Views: 70324 GoogleTechTalks
The Cryptographers’ Panel 2018
 
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Moderator: Zulfikar Ramzan, Chief Technology Officer, RSA Ron Rivest, Institute Professor, MIT Adi Shamir, Professor, Computer Science Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel Whitfield Diffie, Cryptographer and Security Expert, Cryptomathic Paul Kocher, Independent Researcher Moxie Marlinspike, Founder, Signal Despite how sophisticated information security has become, it is still a relatively young discipline. The founders of our field continue to be actively engaged in research and innovation. Join us to hear these luminaries engage in an enlightening discussion on the past, present and future of our industry. https://www.rsaconference.com/events/us18/agenda/sessions/11490-The-Cryptographers%E2%80%99-Panel
Views: 6515 RSA Conference
2011 Killian Lecture: Ronald L. Rivest, "The Growth of Cryptography"
 
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Lecture title: "The Growth of Cryptography" Ronald L. Rivest, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science who helped develop one of the world's most widely used Internet security systems, was MIT’s James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award winner for 2010–2011. Rivest, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi professor in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is known for his pioneering work in the field of cryptography, computer, and network security. February 8, 2011 Huntington Hall (10-250)
How To Invest in Cryptocurrency: Super Beginners Guide
 
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How To Invest in Cryptocurrency: Super Beginners Guide http://www.Ameerrosic.com You'll receive $10 in free bitcoin by signing up with this link http://bit.ly/2oesV41 My name is Ameer Rosic, and I'm a serial entrepreneur, investor, marketing Strategist and Blockchain Evangelist So you’ve been following cryptocurrencies for a while. You’ve seen Bitcoin explode in value, from tiny fractions of a cent a few years ago to their peak of over a thousand dollars. You are, understandably, interested in investing in them. If you’re going to take that road, you need to be aware of some very important details… Buy Bitcoin & Ethereum http://bit.ly/2oesV41 Book Recommendations http://astore.amazon.com/rosicameer-20 Blockchain + Crypto Guides: https://blockgeeks.com/guides/ Get One-to-One Consulting https://clarity.fm/ameerrosic Blog http://www.Ameerrosic.com blockgeeks: http://www.blockgeeks.com Facebook http://www.Facebook.com/ameerrosic Twitter http://www.Twitter.com/ameerrosic InstaGram http://www.Instagram.com/ameerrosic
Views: 441937 Ameer Rosic
Catholics and Statistical Analysis
 
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Ates Altinordu and Philip S. Gorski answer a question on why Catholic countries generally don't fit into the economic model they had presented.
Views: 669 YaleUniversity
Electronic and Internet Voting (The Threat of Internet Voting in Public Elections)
 
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Google Tech Talk January 20, 2011 Presented by Dr. David Jefferson, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ABSTRACT In the last decade the administration of public elections in the United States has become increasingly computerized, leading to great concern in the security community about the security, reliability, privacy, and auditability of electronic voting systems. Although in the last few years there has been substantial progress, against great resistance, in raising the consciousness of state officials about the security vulnerabilities associated with computerized voting, recently the idea of Internet voting, i.e. using private computers or other devices to cast electronic ballots that are transported over the Internet has become increasingly attractive to legislators and election officials. In this talk we argue that Internet voting is much more dangerous than other forms of electronic voting because of the possibility that anyone on Earth, including a foreign nation state, can attack an Internet election from a remote position of safety, and with the possibility of changing the election outcome without ever being discovered. The number of attack modes is enormous, and the prospects for defense extremely weak. Last October the District of Columbia fielded an Internet voting system for an open test, allowing anyone to try it out or attempt to attack it. This test was to be the final hurdle before the system was put to use in the 2010 general election in November. The result could not have been a more dramatic demonstration of the fragility and vulnerability of such systems, and the dangers they pose to national security. Dr. David Jefferson is an internationally recognized expert on voting systems and election technology. He has been a pioneer in research at the intersection of computing, the Internet, and elections for 15 years, and has been an advisor to five successive Secretaries of State of California on technology-related issues. He is a current member and former Chairman of the Board of Directors of the California Voter Foundation (www.calvoter.org) and current Chairman of the Board for Verified Voting (www.verifiedvoting.org), two nonprofit, nonpartisan organizations devoted to promoting open, verifiable election technology. He is also a member of the Board of Advisers of ACCURATE (accurate-voting.org), an NSF-sponsored academic research project on voting technology. For over a decade he has been an active critic of the use of Internet for voting in public elections. In 1999-2000 he was chair of the technical committee of the CA Secretary of State's Task Force on Internet Voting whose report recommended not developing an Internet voting system in California. In 2004 he coauthored a paper with Avi Rubin, Barbara Simons, and David Wagner (servesecurityreport.org) the led to the cancellation of a $22 million DoD project on Internet voting. He continues speaking and writing on the subject at every opportunity today. Jefferson received a Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1980. From 1980 to 1994 he was a computer science professor, first at USC and then at UCLA, where he conducted research in parallel computation, simulation, genetic algorithms, and artificial life. In 1990 he received an R&D 100 Award for leading one of the top 100 research and development projects in the United States. He is known for being the co-inventor of the Time Warp method of parallel discrete event simulation, and is the author of one of the most cited papers in computer science, Virtual Time. He is currently a computer scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he leads research in cyber security and simulation for national security applications.
Views: 10419 GoogleTechTalks
Towards Secure Quadratic Voting
 
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Sunoo Park discusses security issues around voting systems, and what unique security challenges and opportunities are presented by quadratic voting.
Blockchain e Crypto dietro le quinte
 
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New! TheUpdate.it dacci un occhio https://bit.ly/2APfiAT === Prima di cominciare, hai visto qui? https://marcomontemagno.it/progetti --- In questa puntata dello speciale Crypto che sto facendo in collaborazione con Eidoo http://eidoo.io, parliamo con Simona Macellari direttrice di BHB Network e entriamo nel merito dei termini Crypto che sentiamo ogni giorno (blockchain, bitcoin, decentralizzzione, proof of work, proof of stake, ecc) Se vuoi andare oltre alle definizioni standard che i media propinano, questo video fa per te
Views: 40783 Marco Montemagno
Great CrossTalk about Bitcoin Fever! Mass adoption of Bitcoin & Crypto 2018
 
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Bitcoin – for some it is the perfect marriage of technology and finance. For others it is a ‘get rich’ scheme. Though no one can deny its market value is soaring and becoming an attractive alternative to the current global banking system. Is bitcoin revolutionizing the world? CrossTalking with Mitch Feierstein, Jeffrey Tucker, and Garrick Hileman. FACEBOOK: Like CrossTalk on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/crosstalkrules/ SOUNDCLOUD: Listen to CrossTalk+ here https://soundcloud.com/rttv/sets/cros... YOUTUBE: Watch all CrossTalk shows here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... (2015 - Current) http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... (2013 - 2014) http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... (2012 - 2013) http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... (2011 - 2012) http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... (2009 - 2011) RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on VK https://vk.com/rt_international Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT Listen to us on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/rttv RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark. **FAIR USE** Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. FAIR USE DEFINITION: (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use) Fair use is a doctrine in the United States copyright law that allows limited use of copyrighted material without requiring permission from the rights holders, such as for commentary, criticism, news reporting, research, teaching or scholarship. It provides for the legal, non-licensed citation or incorporation of copyrighted material in another author’s work under a four-factor balancing test. The term “fair use” originated in the United States. A similar principle, fair dealing, exists in some other common law jurisdictions. Civil law jurisdictions have other limitations and exceptions to copyright. This video was uplaoded for educational and research reasons.
Views: 103 Quantum Fields
Bitcoin & Cryptocurrencies - Pros and Cons
 
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In this video, I analyze the technical pros and cons of Bitcoin and related cryptocurrencies. Is the hype around Bitcoin really worth it? Look out for the upcoming video where I analyze the investment opportunities in cryptocurrency and whether one should think about investing in them. Links: Is the Federal Reserve Printing Money?: https://www.thebalance.com/is-the-federal-reserve-printing-money-3305842 Why printing money can cause Inflation: https://www.economicshelp.org/blog/797/economics/why-printing-money-causes-inflation/ The link between Money Supply and Inflation: https://www.economicshelp.org/blog/111/inflation/money-supply-inflation/ What is a Bitcoin Brain Wallet? : https://www.cryptocompare.com/wallets/guides/what-is-a-bitcoin-brain-wallet/ More info on Brain Wallets: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Brainwallet Youtube video of resentation by Ryan Castellucci on how he cracked hundreds of Brainwallets: https://youtu.be/foil0hzl4Pg PDF of presentation by Ryan Castellucci on how he cracked hundreds of Brainwallets: https://rya.nc/cracking_cryptocurrency_brainwallets.pdf $44 Million in Ethereum Moved With $0.13 Fee!! : https://coinjournal.net/44-million-ethereum-moved-0-13-fee-can-bitcoin-reach-similar-scalability/ The FBI owns the world's largest Bitcoin wallet! : https://www.wired.com/2013/12/fbi_wallet/ Credits: Outro by AlexBau01 (https://www.youtube.com/user/Alexbau01) Outro sound track: NCS - Matthew Blake feat. Katie Boyle - Saved Me Now (https://www.youtube.com/user/NoCopyrightSounds) Sound Fx : Intro fx: Matt Pavone (https://freesound.org/people/mattpavone) Bleep: SoneProject (https://freesound.org/people/soneproject) DISCLAIMER: This channel is NOT giving any financial advice. Any statements made in any videos are just my opinions. I am not responsible for any investment decisions that you choose to make.
Views: 83 Bharat on Tech
DEF CON 24 - Nate Cardozo - Crypto State of the Law
 
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Strong end-to-end encryption is legal in the United States today, thanks to our victory in what’s come to be known as the Crypto Wars of the 1990s. But in the wake of Paris and San Bernardino, there is increasing pressure from law enforcement and policy makers, both here and abroad, to mandate so-called backdoors in encryption products. In this presentation, I will discuss in brief the history of the first Crypto Wars, and the state of the law coming into 2016. I will then discuss what happened in the fight between Apple and the FBI in San Bernardino and the current proposals to weaken or ban encryption, covering proposed and recently enacted laws in New York, California, Australia, India, and the UK. Finally, I will discuss possible realistic outcomes to the Second Crypto Wars, and give my predictions on what the State of the Law will be at the end of 2016. Bio: Nate Cardozo is a Senior Staff Attorney on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s digital civil liberties team. In addition to his focus on free speech and privacy litigation, Nate works on EFF’s cryptography policy and the Coders’ Rights Project. Nate has projects involving export controls on software, state-sponsored malware, automotive privacy, government transparency, hardware hacking rights, anonymous speech, electronic privacy law reform, Freedom of Information Act litigation, and resisting the expansion of the surveillance state. A 2009-2010 EFF Open Government Legal Fellow, Nate has a B.A. in Anthropology and Politics from U.C. Santa Cruz and a J.D. from U.C. Hastings.
Views: 35 Security Hub
Jonathan Katz: Cryptographic Perspectives on the Future of Privacy
 
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This is Dr. Katz's lecture given as a recipient of the 2017 Distinguished Scholar-Teacher award. The University of Maryland's Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Program, established in 1978, honors a small number of faculty members each year who have demonstrated notable success in both scholarship and teaching. The Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Program is sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs and administered by the Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs.
Views: 306 UMD CS
"Restoring Personal Privacy without Compromising National Security" at ACM Turing 50 Celebration
 
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We live in an era of mass surveillance. Private companies monitor our comings and goings, and ad-supported cloud services record and mine our online activities. At the same time, governments have been conducting extensive surveillance in the name of national security. To a large extent, citizens and lawmakers have accepted loss of privacy in exchange for increased security. Can computing technology promote both personal privacy and national security? Panelists will explore how state-of-the-art cryptography, security, networked systems, and data-management technology might enable government agencies to acquire actionable, useful information about legitimate targets of investigation without intruding upon the electronic activity of innocent parties. They will also address the need to use laws and policies in conjunction with technology to hold government agencies accountable for proper use of private information. Moderator: Joan Feigenbaum, Yale University Panelists: Whitfield Diffie (2015 Turing Laureate), Stanford University Bryan Ford, EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Nadia Heninger, University of Pennsylvania Paul Syverson, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
Biometric | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biometrics 00:01:38 1 Biometric functionality 00:07:54 2 Multimodal biometric system 00:10:14 3 Performance 00:12:55 4 History 00:14:47 5 Adaptive biometric systems 00:16:20 6 Recent advances in emerging biometrics 00:17:51 6.1 Operator signatures 00:18:22 6.2 Proposed requirement for certain public networks 00:19:43 6.3 Animal biometrics 00:20:09 7 Issues and concerns 00:20:19 7.1 Human dignity 00:23:52 7.2 Privacy and discrimination 00:25:17 7.3 Danger to owners of secured items 00:25:54 7.4 Cancelable biometrics 00:28:41 7.5 Soft biometrics 00:30:26 7.6 International sharing of biometric data 00:31:23 7.7 Likelihood of full governmental disclosure 00:32:16 8 Countries applying biometrics 00:33:57 8.1 India's national ID program 00:35:40 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9052391192453548 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biometrics is the technical term for body measurements and calculations. It refers to metrics related to human characteristics. Biometrics authentication (or realistic authentication) is used in computer science as a form of identification and access control. It is also used to identify individuals in groups that are under surveillance. Biometric identifiers are the distinctive, measurable characteristics used to label and describe individuals. Biometric identifiers are often categorized as physiological versus behavioral characteristics. Physiological characteristics are related to the shape of the body. Examples include, but are not limited to fingerprint, palm veins, face recognition, DNA, palm print, hand geometry, iris recognition, retina and odour/scent. Behavioral characteristics are related to the pattern of behavior of a person, including but not limited to typing rhythm, gait, and voice. Some researchers have coined the term behaviometrics to describe the latter class of biometrics.More traditional means of access control include token-based identification systems, such as a driver's license or passport, and knowledge-based identification systems, such as a password or personal identification number. Since biometric identifiers are unique to individuals, they are more reliable in verifying identity than token and knowledge-based methods; however, the collection of biometric identifiers raises privacy concerns about the ultimate use of this information.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Google Internet Summit 2009: Welcome by Eric Schmidt
 
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Google Internet Summit 2009: The State of the Internet May 5, 2009 Welcoming remarks by Eric Schmidt. On May 5 and 6, 2009, in Mountain View, we brought together Googlers and leaders from academia and the corporate world for a 2-day summit to discuss the state of the global Internet. The goal of the summit was to collect a wide range of knowledge to inform Google's future plans--from product development and market reach to users' expectations and our ability to keep the Internet open yet secure. More than 30 speakers and moderators led discussions around 8 topics: Networks; Wireless and Sensor Technologies; Security; Standards; Applications; Democracy, Law, Policy and Regulation; Search and Cloud Computing; and The Future. Eric Schmidt, who offered some remarks, expressed optimism that the challenges we face with governments' walling off access to the Internet can be overcome technologically by building networks that are transparent, scalable, and open.
Views: 4871 GoogleTechTalks
Biometric identification | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biometrics 00:01:43 1 Biometric functionality 00:08:20 2 Multimodal biometric system 00:10:48 3 Performance 00:13:37 4 History 00:15:35 5 Adaptive biometric systems 00:17:13 6 Recent advances in emerging biometrics 00:18:49 6.1 Operator signatures 00:19:21 6.2 Proposed requirement for certain public networks 00:20:47 7 Issues and concerns 00:20:58 7.1 Human dignity 00:24:47 7.2 Privacy and discrimination 00:26:16 7.3 Danger to owners of secured items 00:26:55 7.4 Cancelable biometrics 00:29:52 7.5 Soft biometrics 00:31:43 7.6 International sharing of biometric data 00:32:43 7.7 Likelihood of full governmental disclosure 00:33:38 8 Countries applying biometrics 00:35:24 8.1 India's national ID program 00:37:12 8.2 Biometric authentication in the future 00:39:40 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9305650111980093 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biometrics is the technical term for body measurements and calculations. It refers to metrics related to human characteristics. Biometrics authentication (or realistic authentication) is used in computer science as a form of identification and access control. It is also used to identify individuals in groups that are under surveillance. Biometric identifiers are the distinctive, measurable characteristics used to label and describe individuals. Biometric identifiers are often categorized as physiological versus behavioral characteristics. Physiological characteristics are related to the shape of the body. Examples include, but are not limited to fingerprint, palm veins, face recognition, DNA, palm print, hand geometry, iris recognition, retina and odour/scent. Behavioral characteristics are related to the pattern of behavior of a person, including but not limited to typing rhythm, gait, and voice. Some researchers have coined the term behaviometrics to describe the latter class of biometrics.More traditional means of access control include token-based identification systems, such as a driver's license or passport, and knowledge-based identification systems, such as a password or personal identification number. Since biometric identifiers are unique to individuals, they are more reliable in verifying identity than token and knowledge-based methods; however, the collection of biometric identifiers raises privacy concerns about the ultimate use of this information.
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Biometrics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biometrics 00:01:38 1 Biometric functionality 00:07:51 2 Multimodal biometric system 00:10:11 3 Performance 00:12:52 4 History 00:14:43 5 Adaptive biometric systems 00:16:14 6 Recent advances in emerging biometrics 00:17:45 6.1 Operator signatures 00:18:15 6.2 Proposed requirement for certain public networks 00:19:36 6.3 Animal biometrics 00:20:02 7 Issues and concerns 00:20:12 7.1 Human dignity 00:23:49 7.2 Privacy and discrimination 00:25:13 7.3 Danger to owners of secured items 00:25:51 7.4 Cancelable biometrics 00:28:35 7.5 Soft biometrics 00:30:21 7.6 International sharing of biometric data 00:31:18 7.7 Likelihood of full governmental disclosure 00:32:10 8 Countries applying biometrics 00:33:53 8.1 India's national ID program 00:35:37 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9630466615469516 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biometrics is the technical term for body measurements and calculations. It refers to metrics related to human characteristics. Biometrics authentication (or realistic authentication) is used in computer science as a form of identification and access control. It is also used to identify individuals in groups that are under surveillance. Biometric identifiers are the distinctive, measurable characteristics used to label and describe individuals. Biometric identifiers are often categorized as physiological versus behavioral characteristics. Physiological characteristics are related to the shape of the body. Examples include, but are not limited to fingerprint, palm veins, face recognition, DNA, palm print, hand geometry, iris recognition, retina and odour/scent. Behavioral characteristics are related to the pattern of behavior of a person, including but not limited to typing rhythm, gait, and voice. Some researchers have coined the term behaviometrics to describe the latter class of biometrics.More traditional means of access control include token-based identification systems, such as a driver's license or passport, and knowledge-based identification systems, such as a password or personal identification number. Since biometric identifiers are unique to individuals, they are more reliable in verifying identity than token and knowledge-based methods; however, the collection of biometric identifiers raises privacy concerns about the ultimate use of this information.
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
Out of the Shadows: Reforming NSA Surveillance ─ Timothy Edgar
 
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For decades, the NSA has followed rules to protect against “spying on Americans,” but the rules are out of date. Our communications, personal lives and national security threats are all global. In the twenty first century, the only way to protect our privacy as Americans is to do a better job of protecting everyone’s privacy. Timothy H. Edgar was the first privacy lawyer on Obama’s White House National Security Staff. In this public lecture, he explains both why and how we can do this, without sacrificing the vital intelligence capabilities we need to keep ourselves and our allies safe. Timothy H. Edgar is a senior fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and serves as the academic director for law and policy in Brown's new Executive Master of Cybersecurity program. His work focuses on the unique policy challenges posed by growing global cyber conflict, particularly in reconciling security interests with fundamental values, including privacy and Internet freedom. He is also a contributing editor to "Lawfare: Hard National Security Choices," published in cooperation with the Brookings Institution. Mr. Edgar served under President Obama from 2009 to 2010 as the first director of privacy and civil liberties for the White House National Security Staff, focusing on cybersecurity, open government, and data privacy initiatives. From 2006 to 2009, he was the first deputy for civil liberties for the director of national intelligence, reviewing new surveillance authorities, the terrorist watchlist, and other sensitive programs. From 2010 to 2012, he was counsel for the information sharing environment, which facilitates the secure sharing of terrorism-related information. Prior to his government service, Mr. Edgar was the national security and immigration counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union from 2001 to 2006, where he spearheaded the organization's innovative left- right coalition advocating for safeguards for a number of post-9/11 counterterrorism initiatives, including the USA Patriot Act. He frequently testified before Congress and appeared in major television, radio, and print media. Sponsored by the Brown University Executive Master in Cybersecurity.
Privacy Research Panel, 2013 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
 
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Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field. The panel, jointly organized with the US Government's Senior Steering Group for cybersecurity R&D explored questions, opportunities, and challenges in privacy research. Panelists (left to right): Betsy Masiello, Senior Manager, Global Public Policy, Google Karyn Higa-Smith, IdM/privacy R&D Program Manager, DHS S&T Cyber Security Division Deirdre Mulligan, professor of law, UC Berkeley School of Information Moderator: Daniel Weitzner, Director, Decentralized Information Group, MIT CSAIL Vijayalakshmi (Vijay) Atluri, NSF/SaTC Progam Director Joan Feigenbaum, professor of computer science, Yale University Jeannette Wing, VP, Head of Microsoft Research International More info: http://ieee-security.org/TC/SP2013/index.html
Views: 1088 NITRD Program
Science and technology in Venezuela | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:17:50
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_and_technology_in_Venezuela 00:03:04 1 Biology 00:03:13 1.1 Ecology 00:15:45 1.2 Epidemiology 00:25:24 1.3 Microbiology 00:29:30 1.4 Immunology 00:34:59 2 Chemistry 00:35:07 2.1 Electro-chemistry 00:37:52 2.2 Food chemistry 00:41:27 2.3 Inorganic chemistry 00:45:04 2.4 Organic chemistry 00:50:56 3 Engineering 00:51:05 3.1 Civil engineering 00:53:29 3.2 Hydraulic engineering 00:54:48 3.3 Food engineering 00:57:28 3.4 Structural engineering 00:59:38 3.5 Petroleum engineering 01:01:01 4 Inventors 01:14:48 5 Mathematics 01:14:57 5.1 Calculus 01:24:00 6 Medicine 01:24:09 6.1 Experimental medicine 01:31:21 6.2 Internal medicine 01:35:25 6.3 Surgery 01:44:10 7 Physics 01:44:19 7.1 Astrophysics 01:49:01 7.2 Particle physics 01:51:45 7.3 Theoretical physics 01:53:27 8 Social sciences 01:53:36 8.1 Education 01:56:20 8.2 Sociology 02:01:11 8.3 Science journalism 02:03:31 9 Technology 02:03:40 9.1 Computer science 02:11:10 9.2 Materials Technology 02:13:18 10 Scientific institutions 02:17:29 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7382326410246569 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Science and technology in Venezuela includes research based on exploring Venezuela's diverse ecology and the lives of its indigenous peoples. Under the Spanish rule, the monarchy made very little effort to promote education in the American colonies and in particular in those in which they had less commercial interest, as in Venezuela. The country only had its first university some two hundred years later than Mexico, Colombia or Peru. The first studies on the native languages of Venezuela and the indigenous customs were made in the middle of the XVIII century by the Catholic missionaries. The Italian Jesuit Filippo Salvatore Gilii was one of the first to theorize about linguistic relations and propose possible language families for the Orinoco river basin. The Swedish botanist Pehr Löfling, one of the 12 Apostles of Carl Linnaeus, classificated for the first time the exhuberant tropical flora of the Orinoco river basin. In the XIX century several scientists visited Venezuela such as Alexander Humboldt, Aimé Bonpland, Agostino Codazzi, Jean-Baptiste Boussingault, Mariano Rivero, François de Pons, Robert Hermann Schomburgk, Wilhelm Sievers, Carl Ferdinand Appun, Gustav Karsten, Adolf Ernst, Benedikt Roezl, Karl Moritz, Friedrich Gerstäcker, Anton Goering, Johann Gottlieb Benjamin Siegert, Alfred Russel Wallace, Jean Chaffanjon, Émile-Arthur Thouar, Jules Crevaux and many others, some of whom are buried in Venezuela. The Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC) founded on February 9, 1959 by government decree, has its origins in the Venezuelan Institute of Neurology and Brain Research (IVNIC) which Dr. Humberto Fernandez Moran founded in 1955. Other major research institutions include the Central University of Venezuela and the University of the Andes, Venezuela. Notable Venezuelan scientists include nineteenth century physician José María Vargas , the chemist Vicente Marcano and the botanist and geographer Alfredo Jahn (1867–1940). More recently, Baruj Benacerraf shared the 1980 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Augusto Pi Sunyer (1955), Aristides Bastidas (1980), Marcel Roche (1987) and Marisela Salvatierra (2002) have been recipients of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for promotion of the public understanding of science. On July 2, 2012, L. Rafael Reif – a Venezuelan American electrical engineer, inventor and academic administrator – was elected president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Views: 119 wikipedia tts
Internet of things | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:28:42
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_things 00:01:35 1 History 00:04:10 2 Applications 00:04:31 2.1 Consumer applications 00:05:02 2.1.1 Smart home 00:06:27 2.1.2 Elder care 00:07:38 2.2 Commercial application 00:07:48 2.2.1 Medical and healthcare 00:12:45 2.2.2 Transportation 00:14:30 2.2.3 V2X communications 00:15:44 2.2.4 Building and home automation 00:16:48 2.3 Industrial applications 00:16:58 2.3.1 Manufacturing 00:21:28 2.3.2 Agriculture 00:22:55 2.4 Infrastructure applications 00:24:36 2.4.1 Metropolitan scale deployments 00:28:01 2.4.2 Energy management 00:29:18 2.4.3 Environmental monitoring 00:31:44 3 Trends and characteristics 00:32:53 3.1 Intelligence 00:36:48 3.2 Architecture 00:39:17 3.2.1 Network architecture 00:40:18 3.3 Complexity 00:41:44 3.4 Size considerations 00:42:35 3.5 Space considerations 00:44:14 3.6 A solution to "basket of remotes" 00:45:24 4 Enabling technologies for IoT 00:45:51 4.1 Addressability 00:47:43 4.2 Short-range wireless 00:49:23 4.3 Medium-range wireless 00:49:48 4.4 Long-range wireless 00:50:31 4.5 Wired 00:51:08 4.6 Standards and standards organizations 00:51:31 5 Politics and civic engagement 00:52:37 6 Government regulation on IoT 00:57:08 7 Criticism and controversies 00:57:19 7.1 Platform fragmentation 00:58:55 7.2 Privacy, autonomy, and control 01:04:34 7.3 Data storage 01:05:39 7.4 Security 01:13:01 7.5 Safety 01:15:16 7.6 Design 01:16:43 7.7 Environmental sustainability impact 01:17:46 7.8 Intentional obsolescence of devices 01:19:44 7.9 Confusing terminology 01:21:59 8 IoT adoption barriers 01:22:10 8.1 Lack of interoperability and unclear value propositions 01:23:00 8.2 Privacy and security concerns 01:25:44 8.3 Traditional governance structures 01:27:59 8.4 Business planning and models Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.853658961081484 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Internet of things (IoT) is the extension of Internet connectivity into physical devices and everyday objects. Embedded with electronics, Internet connectivity, and other forms of hardware (such as sensors), these devices can communicate and interact with others over the Internet, and they can be remotely monitored and controlled.The definition of the Internet of things has evolved due to convergence of multiple technologies, real-time analytics, machine learning, commodity sensors, and embedded systems. Traditional fields of embedded systems, wireless sensor networks, control systems, automation (including home and building automation), and others all contribute to enabling the Internet of things. In the consumer market, IoT technology is most synonymous with products pertaining to the concept of the "smart home", covering devices and appliances (such as lighting fixtures, thermostats, home security systems and cameras, and other home appliances) that support one or more common ecosystems, and can be controlled via devices associated with that ecosystem, such as smartphones and smart speakers. The IoT concept has faced prominent criticism, especially in regards to privacy and security concerns related to these devices and their intention of pervasive presence.
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Biometric | Wikipedia audio article
 
35:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biometrics 00:01:30 1 Biometric functionality 00:07:17 2 Multimodal biometric system 00:09:27 3 Performance 00:11:56 4 History 00:13:40 5 Adaptive biometric systems 00:15:06 6 Recent advances in emerging biometrics 00:16:30 6.1 Operator signatures 00:16:59 6.2 Proposed requirement for certain public networks 00:18:15 7 Issues and concerns 00:18:25 7.1 Human dignity 00:21:43 7.2 Privacy and discrimination 00:23:02 7.3 Danger to owners of secured items 00:23:37 7.4 Cancelable biometrics 00:26:10 7.5 Soft biometrics 00:27:49 7.6 International sharing of biometric data 00:28:42 7.7 Likelihood of full governmental disclosure 00:29:31 8 Countries applying biometrics 00:31:06 8.1 India's national ID program 00:32:42 8.2 Biometric authentication in the future 00:34:52 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8910005280584031 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biometrics is the technical term for body measurements and calculations. It refers to metrics related to human characteristics. Biometrics authentication (or realistic authentication) is used in computer science as a form of identification and access control. It is also used to identify individuals in groups that are under surveillance. Biometric identifiers are the distinctive, measurable characteristics used to label and describe individuals. Biometric identifiers are often categorized as physiological versus behavioral characteristics. Physiological characteristics are related to the shape of the body. Examples include, but are not limited to fingerprint, palm veins, face recognition, DNA, palm print, hand geometry, iris recognition, retina and odour/scent. Behavioral characteristics are related to the pattern of behavior of a person, including but not limited to typing rhythm, gait, and voice. Some researchers have coined the term behaviometrics to describe the latter class of biometrics.More traditional means of access control include token-based identification systems, such as a driver's license or passport, and knowledge-based identification systems, such as a password or personal identification number. Since biometric identifiers are unique to individuals, they are more reliable in verifying identity than token and knowledge-based methods; however, the collection of biometric identifiers raises privacy concerns about the ultimate use of this information.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Intelligence cycle management | Wikipedia audio article
 
40:54
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_cycle_management 00:01:18 1 Overview 00:01:27 1.1 Intelligence defined 00:02:19 1.2 Management of the intelligence cycle 00:05:29 1.3 Planning and direction overview 00:06:39 2 Requirements 00:07:23 2.1 National/strategic 00:08:46 2.2 Military/operational 00:10:35 3 Intelligence architecture 00:11:52 3.1 Budgeting 00:15:31 3.2 Policy factors 00:16:04 3.3 Balancing law enforcement and national security 00:19:26 3.4 Public versus private 00:23:05 4 Collection planning 00:23:49 4.1 CCIRM 00:28:31 5 Issuance of orders and requests 00:28:55 5.1 Prioritization 00:30:31 6 Other topics 00:30:40 6.1 Political misuse 00:31:32 6.2 Clandestine intelligence versus covert action 00:32:38 6.2.1 Coordination of HUMINT and covert action 00:35:06 6.2.2 Common risks and resources 00:37:24 7 Failures in the intelligence cycle 00:38:54 8 Other cycles 00:39:03 8.1 Boyd OODA loop Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8550057021048121 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Intelligence cycle management refers to the overall activity of guiding the intelligence cycle, which is a set of processes used to provide decision-useful information (intelligence) to leaders. The cycle consists of several processes, including planning and direction (the focus of this article), collection, processing and exploitation, analysis and production, and dissemination and integration. The related field of counterintelligence is tasked with impeding the intelligence efforts of others. Intelligence organizations are not infallible (intelligence reports are often referred to as "estimates," and often include measures of confidence and reliability) but, when properly managed and tasked, can be among the most valuable tools of management and government. The principles of intelligence have been discussed and developed from the earliest writers on warfare to the most recent writers on technology. Despite the most powerful computers, the human mind remains at the core of intelligence, discerning patterns and extracting meaning from a flood of correct, incorrect, and sometimes deliberately misleading information (also known as disinformation).
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Biometrics | Wikipedia audio article
 
35:44
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biometrics 00:01:32 1 Biometric functionality 00:07:23 2 Multimodal biometric system 00:09:35 3 Performance 00:12:07 4 History 00:13:53 5 Adaptive biometric systems 00:15:20 6 Recent advances in emerging biometrics 00:16:47 6.1 Operator signatures 00:17:16 6.2 Proposed requirement for certain public networks 00:18:33 7 Issues and concerns 00:18:43 7.1 Human dignity 00:22:07 7.2 Privacy and discrimination 00:23:27 7.3 Danger to owners of secured items 00:24:03 7.4 Cancelable biometrics 00:26:39 7.5 Soft biometrics 00:28:20 7.6 International sharing of biometric data 00:29:14 7.7 Likelihood of full governmental disclosure 00:30:04 8 Countries applying biometrics 00:31:41 8.1 India's national ID program 00:33:18 8.2 Biometric authentication in the future 00:35:30 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9407815725953922 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biometrics is the technical term for body measurements and calculations. It refers to metrics related to human characteristics. Biometrics authentication (or realistic authentication) is used in computer science as a form of identification and access control. It is also used to identify individuals in groups that are under surveillance. Biometric identifiers are the distinctive, measurable characteristics used to label and describe individuals. Biometric identifiers are often categorized as physiological versus behavioral characteristics. Physiological characteristics are related to the shape of the body. Examples include, but are not limited to fingerprint, palm veins, face recognition, DNA, palm print, hand geometry, iris recognition, retina and odour/scent. Behavioral characteristics are related to the pattern of behavior of a person, including but not limited to typing rhythm, gait, and voice. Some researchers have coined the term behaviometrics to describe the latter class of biometrics.More traditional means of access control include token-based identification systems, such as a driver's license or passport, and knowledge-based identification systems, such as a password or personal identification number. Since biometric identifiers are unique to individuals, they are more reliable in verifying identity than token and knowledge-based methods; however, the collection of biometric identifiers raises privacy concerns about the ultimate use of this information.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts