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Energy Success Stories New Coal: Innovations for Utah's Energy Future
 
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OED's latest installment, "Energy Success Stories New Coal: Innovations for Utah's Energy Future," travels below the earth's surface to explore the state's most resilient base-load source of power.  With more than 70 percent of Utah's power generated from coal, this prized natural resource continues to play a crucial role in fueling the state's nationally lauded economy and high quality of life.  Approximately 18 million tons of coal is produced in Utah each year (2014), and valued at $600 million.  Not only does Utah's low sulfur, high BTU coal have environmental and safety advantages, but the state's coal-fired power plants are also among the most efficient in the country. Featuring a key interview with the U.S. Department of Energy's David Mohler, this film chronicles Utah's coal journey from mining to new innovations, through Bowie Resource's Sufco Mine, Des Bee Dove Mine, Hunter Power Plant, the University of Utah's Coal and Gasification Lab, and Sustainable Energy Solutions.
Trucks and the SUFCO Mine
 
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Runbys and video footage of loading out truck at the mine. Created with Corel Pinnacle Studio
Views: 3566 Jimmy B
The County Seat - Discussing Coal Mining in Southern Utah
 
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We are on location this week and we at the Coal Hollow Mine which if part of Alton Coal and we are at the mine office on site today to bring you a firsthand look at the Alton Coal Operation. We are going to start by taking a look at what the coal mining process is from the day they first scratch the surface to the time they turn it over to the birds the bees and the critters. Watch again here: https://youtu.be/vUio0Vd1UEg Subscribe to our YouTube Channel here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thecountyseat To sign up to get interesting news and updates delivered to your inbox click here: http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/d.jsp?llr=5xgaaniab&p=oi&m=1108537776894&sit=s9dn94ngb&f=6eb166d3-69a2-4ef3-9b95-cbaf87858350 You can watch our most recent episode here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv Check out our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TheCountySeatTV Twitter: https://twitter.com/seattv Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/2/b/117932477921089703696/ YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/thecountyseattv The County Seat Website: http://TheCountySeatTV.com/ Also watch our other channel - At Your Leisure: https://www.youtube.com/user/Boothandcompany A Chadwick Booth & Co. Production 2469 E. 7000 S. Suite 110 Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 (801) 947-8888 Fax: (801) 947-9888 You can Contact us here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv/contactus.htmll You can watch the show on these fantastic channels: http://www.4utah.com/station/listings #TheCountySeat #TCSTV
Views: 162 The County Seat
11 Most Massive Mines in the World
 
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From the worlds largest gold mine found on the top of a mountain to the largest diamond mine in the world here are the most massive mines in the world! Subscribe to American EYE! 5.. Asbestos Mine, Canada Also known as the Jeffrey Mine, it’s located in Asbestos, Quebec and it was in operation until 2012. It’s a whopping 2 kilometers wide and 370 meters deep! Check out this thing on google maps and you can tell how completely massive this thing is! It’s the by far the largest asbestos mine in the world. For a long period of time, people would use this mineral to put into their walls and keep their homes from catching on fire! But recently there’s been a link with asbestos and a disease called mesothelioma, which is a lung condition. This is a toxic substance that people should avoid, so obviously this large mine went out of business. The lake at the bottom might look like an inviting blue, but you can bet your bottom dollar, it’s highly toxic! The small town that grew with the thriving asbestos industry feels like they’ve kind of lost their identity once the mine was forced to close, but people do still live there. 4. Mcarthur River Uranium Mine In case you were wondering which mine produces the most uranium in the world, that would be of course the Mcarthur River uranium mine in Saskatchewan Canada. This huge deposit was found in 1988 and finally a mining operation took place in 1997, when it began producing what’s known as Yellowcake. It’s not the kind of yellow cake you’d eat with your grandparents. This stuff has a horrific odor and basically what it is, is concentrated uranium powder which can then be used for powering nuclear reactors. We imagine this powdery substance is quite difficult to get ahold of. There aren’t a ton of photos of this place but, it does produce about 13 percent of the global uranium production across the globe. 3. Diavik Diamond Mine In case you thought it was Africa who had all the massive diamond mines, think again! The Diavik Diamond mine, found in the the northwest territories of Canada is one of the largest producers of diamonds in the Northern hemisphere and this place is pretty crazy! They annually produce 7 million carats of diamonds each year and you better believe it’s not easy to get here. The Diavik mine is found north of the arctic circle and it’s definitely cold! This photo here shows the subarctic landscapes that surround the diamond mine. You thought getting to work in the morning was tough for you? Imagine trying to get to work here! Just recently in 2015, this diamond produced what was known as the Diavik Foxfire 187.7 which is one of the largest rough gem quality diamonds ever produced. 2. Siberian Diamond Mine Also known as the Mirny Mine, The USSR began searching for ways to make to make themselves a more economical stable and independent union. In 1955 the Soviets discovered large diamond deposits at this site in the far away lands of Siberia and many people got to work very quickly in order to help bring wealth to the union. After about 20 years of operations, they finally decided that At one point this mine produced 10 million carats of diamonds a year and reaches a max depth of 524 meters or around 1700 feet making it the 2nd largest excavated hole in the world. The mine is so deep, airspace is closed over the hole due to helicopter crashes caused from the downward flow of air. The construction of this in the frigid conditions of Siberia must have been grueling and downright cruel. Sources state that the machinery used at this mine had to be covered at night or it would freeze Are the diamonds worth freezing to death?! It’s unoperational today but Some claim that there’s still a bunch of diamonds in this mine and the whole thing could be worth about 12 Billion dollars. It’s possible that controlling this diamond is mine is crucial to controlling the price of diamonds across the world. Bingham Copper Mine The bingham copper mine located near Salt Lake City Utah is home to the biggest pit in the world and it’s been in operation since 1903. It’s about 2.5 miles wide and if it were a stadium, it would be able to fit an estimated 9.5 million people. It keeps getting bigger and bigger too! Diligent workers can move about 250,000 tons of rock each day and it’s even become a tourist attraction in recent years before a massive landslide took place. Some claim that this was the biggest non volcanic landslide to take place in North American modern history. This photo we see here shows you the aftermath of this massive landslide and Bingham Copper mine and it makes you wonder how safe some of the conditions at these mines truly are. The landslides were so massive, that they actually triggered a few small earthquakes! Experts estimated that 165 tons of earth slide down from the top of the mine all the way to the bottom.
Views: 271907 American Eye
Remember Wilberg
 
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"Remember Wilberg" is a documentary produced by UTA's Department of Art and Art History about a December 1984 fire at the Wilberg Mine in Emery County, Utah. The fire killed 27 coal miners. The documentary took more than two years to produce. While it honors the victims of the disaster, it will also be used as a safety training tool for coal miners. A $1.3 million federal grant that was awarded to UTA's Division of Enterprise Development funded the project.
Views: 32038 USMRA 1
Energy Success Stories: Utah's Coal & Advanced Technologies Trailer
 
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Full video available in September on energy.utah.gov/videos
Search continues for six trapped Utah coal miners; presser
 
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AP Television Huntington, Utah - 7 August 2007 1. Tilt up from Sheriff's car to hill top 2. Close-up mine worker putting equipment in back of pick-up truck and getting into cab 3. Close-up two miners checking out after working shift 4. Pan, police checking vehicle as it is driven into site 5. Wide news conference at site by Bob Murray, chairman of Murray Energy Corporation 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bob Murray, chairman of Murray Energy Corporation: "Our people are back in there now, progressing towards the miners. The progress has been too slow, too slow. It will take, ladies and gentlemen, three days, if everything goes right, to get to these miners. At that time we will know whether they are alive or dead." 7. Close-up Murray speaking pan to reporters 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bob Murray, chairman of Murray Energy Corporation: "Now the Lord has already decided whether they are alive or dead and whether they were killed from the percussion from the earthquake, but it's up to Bob Murray and my management to get the access to them as quickly as we can." 9. Mid shot news conference 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bob Murray, chairman of Murray Energy Corporation: "The area where these men are is entirely surrounded by solid, firm, strong pillars of coal. There was no 'retreat' mining in the immediate vicinity of these miners." 11. Mid shot reporters talking to Julia Jones 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Julie Jones, whose son, Elam, works at the mine: "My son works with this mine, yes. And he's been with this mine two years and I briefly seen him for just a few moments last night and he said at times that they were just on their hands and knees digging with their hands to get... whatever they could do to get the guys out." 13. Close-up sign reading: Emery County Senior Citizens Huntington Centre (building where families are waiting for news) 14. Wide shot Centre where families are waiting AP Television - No Access Utah Huntington, Utah - 6 August 2007 15. Various aerial views of mine STORYLINE: Efforts continued on Tuesday to reach six coal miners trapped more than 1,500 feet (457 metres) underground in the US state of Utah. The chairman of one of the mining companies which owns the mine said it would take at least three days to reach the men, and only then would they know whether the men had survived the cave-in. Bob Murray, chairman of Murray Energy Corporation of Cleveland, which part owns the Crandall Canyon mine, told reporters: "Progress has been too slow, too slow." Crews worked through the night in shifts, with teams coming and going along the road leading to the Crandall Canyon mine in a forested canyon. Even then, rescuers will have only a 2-inch (5-centimetre) hole into the chamber through which to communicate with the miners and provide them food or air, Murray said. Murray said rescue crews moved only 310 feet (95 metres) closer to the miners in the first 30 hours after the cave-in. The trapped miners - at least three of whom are Mexican - were believed to be in a chamber 3.4 miles (5.5 kilometres) inside the mine. Rescuers were able to reach a point about 1,700 feet (518 metres) from that point before being blocked by debris. Workers in hard hats came and went along a road leading to the mine in a forested canyon among mountains. Dozens of trucks and cars headed in near dawn and several miners emerged with blackened cheeks after an all-night shift. Murray said there were 30 pieces of "massive" mining equipment in place and 134 people dedicated to the rescue. He insisted that an earthquake caused the cave-in and denied that a method called "retreat mining" was taking place at the time. In that method, pillars of coal are used to hold up an area of the mine's roof. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/999598d8788a30c0bc64f73bfbe22339 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 734 AP Archive
Rio Tinto Kennecott Copper Mine Utah Visitor Area
 
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Rio Tinto Kennecott Copper mine located in Bingham Canyon, Utah. The current company formed in 1898. Kennecott's Bingham Canyon Mine is one of the largest man-made open pit mines in the world.
Views: 265 RoadTrippinNomad
Fully Mechanized Longwall Coal Production
 
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Fully mechanized Longwall Coal Production
Views: 275106 mining videos
How Coal is Mined (2/2)
 
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Join award winning teacher Jonathan Bergmann as he explains how coal is mined.This video was made for his 9th grade students. |Uploaded with TubeShack http://www.shacksoftware.com
Views: 30468 Jon Bergmann
Bingham Canyon Mine, The Largest Open-Pit Mines in the World
 
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The Bingham Canyon Mine, also known as the Kennecott Copper Mine, is an open-pit mining operation extracting a large porphyry copper deposit southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, in the Oquirrh Mountains. The Bingham Canyon Mine is one of the largest open-pit mines in the world, measuring more than 4 kilometers or 2.5 miles wide and 1,200 meters or 3,900 feet deep. Since 1906, when the first steam shovels began removing waste rock from the sides of the mountain to reach the low-grade copper ore deposits,Bingham Canyon Mine has yielded more than 19 million tons of copper, 23 million ounces of gold, 190 million ounces of silver, plus other minerals. The value of the resources extracted from here is greater than the Comstock Lode, Klondike, and California gold rush mining regions combined! Bingham Canyon discovered in 1848 by two brothers, Sanford and Thomas Bingham. Although they reported the find to their leader, Brigham Young advised against pursuing mining operations because the survival and establishment of Mormon settlements was of greater importance at that time. It was not until 1863 that extraction of low-grade porphyry copper ore began. These nineteenth-century mines, though, were relatively small. However, in 1903, Daniel Jackling and Enos Wall organized the Utah Copper Company and began construction of a pilot mill at Copperton, just beyond the mouth of the canyon. Serious mining efforts got underway in 1906. The Kennecott Copper Corporation that operated mines in Kennecott, Alaska, acquired the company in 1936. this mine, which is on the National Register of Historic Sites, is just one of the two man-made objects on earth that can be seen by astronauts from outer space. The other is the Great Wall Of China. [source 1 2] On April 10, 2013, Bingham Canyon also produced the largest, non-volcanic landslide in the history of North America when 65–70 million cubic meters of dirt and rock thundered down the side of the pit. The event was large enough that seismic networks designed to record earthquakes detected the rumble of sliding debris. [source] Today, the mine is owned by Rio Tinto Group, an international mining and exploration company headquartered in the United Kingdom. The copper operations at Bingham Canyon Mine are managed through Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation (KUCC) which operates the mine, a concentrator plant, a smelter, and a refinery. As of 2010, KUCC is the second largest copper producer in the United States and meets about 13-18% percent of the country’s needs for copper. [source] A big tire from one of the mine's 190-ton capacity dump trucks that serves as a photo op, and a tape loop that spouts facts 'n figures about the mighty hole in English, Spanish, German, and Japanese. "The Bingham Canyon Mine produces a quarter-millions tons of copper annually," it announces. "The mine has been dubbed, 'The Richest Hole on Earth'." Image credit Stephanie Ip
Views: 4650 World Punjabi News
Utah mine disaster -- angry mine CEO
 
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CNN coverage of Mr. Murray, mine company CEO, giving a press conference. He's unhappy with the press and some of their sources.
Views: 29680 shavedape777
The County Seat - Mining In Utah
 
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Today we are going to center our discussion around the importance of mineral extraction in the state. Utah has a diverse portfolio and there are all kinds of minerals both common fuel and energy based and rare earth minerals that come out of our state and we are going to take an impact on that has in Utah’s rural communities and the importance to our portfolio overall. Watch again here: https://youtu.be/kr10-YMuNJ0 Subscribe to our YouTube Channel here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thecountyseat To sign up to get interesting news and updates delivered to your inbox click here: http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/d.jsp?llr=5xgaaniab&p=oi&m=1108537776894&sit=s9dn94ngb&f=6eb166d3-69a2-4ef3-9b95-cbaf87858350 You can watch our most recent episode here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv Check out our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TheCountySeatTV Twitter: https://twitter.com/seattv Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/2/b/117932477921089703696/ YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/thecountyseattv The County Seat Website: http://TheCountySeatTV.com/ Also watch our other channel - At Your Leisure: https://www.youtube.com/user/Boothandcompany A Chadwick Booth & Co. Production 2469 E. 7000 S. Suite 110 Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 (801) 947-8888 Fax: (801) 947-9888 You can Contact us here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv/contactus.htmll You can watch the show on these fantastic channels: http://www.4utah.com/station/listings #TheCountySeat #TCSTV
Views: 205 The County Seat
In Search of The Utah Railway - From Midvale to Helper
 
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We follow the tracks of the Utah Railway from Helper to Midvale and wander through the shops. A fun look at Helper, a 1950 era gas station and a Rockolla juke box! A bit of Utah railroad history, the coal mines of Carbon County and some major screwing around! ****************************************************************** Utah Railway has operated coal trains from mines in east central Utah to a connection with Union Pacific at Provo, Utah, since 1917. Many writers over the years have assumed that since Utah Railway operated Union Pacific-design locomotives, cars, and cabooses, Union Pacific must have been either full or part owner of this coal hauling line. This has never been the case. Utah Railway was organized in 1912 as the Utah Coal Railway, and construction began immediately. Utah Railway's parent company was United States Fuel Co., a subsidiary of United States Smelting, Refining & Mining Co., which owned extensive coal lands in east central Utah. The line was completed in 1914, and between 1914 and 1917 the railroad was operated under contract by Denver & Rio Grande. In 1917, Utah Railway took over its own operations due to the company's dissatisfaction with the level of service that D&RG was providing. The main difficulty was D&RG's inability to provide sufficient empty coal cars to fill the shipping needs of Utah Railway's parent company, United States Fuel Co. Union Pacific's involvement came because Utah Railway was a major source of interchange traffic for UP subsidiary San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake at Provo, Utah. To replace the D&RG operations, Utah Railway approached Union Pacific for help in setting up its operational and maintenance organizations, including designing and purchasing rolling stock. When Utah Railway began operating its own trains on November 1, 1917, after giving a one year notice as required under the D&RG contract, its new operating department put into use six 2-10-2 and three 2-8-8-0s built to Union Pacific design. The new equipment also included 1,500 Utah Coal Route drop bottom gondolas, jointly owned between Utah Railway and the newly renamed Los Angeles & Salt Lake (then still jointly owned by UP's OSL subsidiary, and the line's original organizer, Senator William Clark). http://utahrails.net ********************************************************************* See more at http://oscaleguys.com/oscaleguys.html http://guyshobbyshop.com/ eBay store Toy Man Television -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "The Trains of Santa Cruz California" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nv0S8Sa18mY -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 10356 Toy Man Television
Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining
 
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The Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining created this video to educate and inform Utah residents about what the Division does and how it benefits our quality of life.
Views: 729 Utah DOGM
Utah’s three largest coal mines have been sold to a group led by Murra
 
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The largest coal company in Utah, which employs about 840 people at three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to a consortium led by Murray. The largest coal company in Utah, which employs about 840 people at three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to a consortium led by Murray. Salt Lake Tribune: The largest coal company in Utah, which employs about 840 people at three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to a. Real E News: The largest coal company in Utah, which employs about 840 people at three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to. The largest coal company in Utah, which employs about 840 people at three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to a consortium led by Murray. Via Salt Lake Tribune: The largest coal company in Utah, which employs about 840 people at three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to a.. Utah's largest newspaper.. You always have the option to delete your Tweet. Utah's three largest coal mines have been sold to a group led by Murray. business Utah's three largest coal mines have been sold to a group led by Murray Energy Not a Topix user yet? Sign Up. Utah's three largest coal mines have been sold to a group. three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to a consortium led by Murray. Your neighbors at the Utah Chapter, Sierra Club are. Utah's largest mines sold to Murray Energy. Utah's three largest coal mines have been sold to a group led. Topix › Emery County › Utah's three largest coal mines have. Utah's three largest coal mines have been sold to a group led by Murray Energy. and ever-stricter air pollution regulations have led to a wave of coal. the five mines being sold to the. 5 Coal Mines To Murray. Utah's Three Largest Coal Mines Sold to Group Led by. at three central Utah mines, has been sold for an undisclosed price to a consortium led by Murray. Murray moves on western coal m
Views: 11 USA News
COP24 environment summit being held in Polish coal mining city
 
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(27 Nov 2018) Poland, Europe's largest source of coal, will host this year's global climate summit in Katowice, the main city in Silesia, an area with a centuries-old mining tradition. The two-week conference starting December 2 will see governments, scientists and campaigners from around the world haggle over how to implement the Paris climate accord. The 2015 agreement set a goal of keeping global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), which experts say requires sharp cuts in carbon emissions that can only be achieved by getting rid of coal-fired power plants. Poland's government argues that Katowice is a showcase for how a colliery centre can be transformed into a modern, environment-friendly city. The venue is a closed mine turned into a museum and culture centre. But despite the creation of a green technology hub and numerous new parks in recent years, Katowice and the surrounding region remains heavily reliant on coal. For Tomasz Mlynarczyk who operates heavy extraction machinery at the Wujek mine in Katowice, coal is a "treasure." "If there was no coal there would be no jobs," he said. Climate activists believe it is time for Poland to move away from the industry. However the mining industry has long been a source of pride and employment for generations of Silesians and 83 percent of Poland's energy still comes from coal. Consecutive governments have been assuring miners in Silesia, home to some 4 million people, that coal will remain important, if not leading, energy source until 2050. "The industry is still present in our city but no longer to such a significant degree as it used to be," said Katowice's mayor Marcin Krupa. Engineer and environmental activist Patryk Bialas plans to drive home that message during next month's climate conference in Katowice. "Coal and mining industry is a very strong element of our regional and local identity, for sure, but people are ready for change - and what they expect from politicians: they expect hope, new jobs and growth," Bialas said. At the same time, Poland's rollout of renewable energy, which provide about 15 percent of its electricity, has stalled, in part due to legislation that protects traditional, state-owned energy companies. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/07c9fc01b5b31d604eba4e2d8cec1d5f
Views: 495 AP Archive
Giant shovels in open pit copper mine in Uath.
 
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Giant shovels in open pit copper mine in Utah. The dump trucks fully loaded can weigh over 1 million Pounds. The visitor center will be close until 2014 at least due to the ground shifting so I will not be able to get any new footage this year bummer I am so sad I love going to watch these great machines in action. Music from videoblocks.com
Views: 45945 RiverRockPhotos
Utah Copper Company-Bingham Canyon
 
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Excerpts from the 1955 film "American Harvest" showing operations of the Utah Copper Company's open-pit Bingham Canyon Mine. "American Harvest" is from the Prelinger Archives, Library of Congress, and as a holding of a federal institution is released to the public domain. Original file downloaded from Archive.org
Views: 538 RebeloftheRockies
Coal_1
 
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Dan Baker, CEO and President of the Bronco Utah Mine, talks about the mine near Emery on Mar 29, 2017.
Views: 863 Jeffrey Allred
Canyon Fuel Company’s Sufco mine - Earth Day 2015 Award Recipient
 
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Each year the Utah Board of Oil, Gas and Mining recognizes companies or individuals who exceed regulatory requirements in protecting the environment while extracting essential natural resources.
Views: 385 Utah DOGM
OPEN PIT MINING OF COPPER IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST 1960s MOVIE  57284
 
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Produced by the Marion Power Shovel Company, this fascinating movie looks at copper and copper mining in the 1960s, when the American mines were at peak production and financial troubles loomed. The film looks at the future of mining, including the development of efficiencies to keep mines in business. Open pit mining techniques are shown, with a focus on the Southwest. At 2:00, Bingham Canyon and the Utah Mining Company pit (also known as the Kennecott Copper Mine) is seen. At 2:40, various open pit mines are seen which use either trucks or trains to remove ore. Although they are not named, it's likely that one of them is the Phelps-Dodge mine at Bisbee, Arizona. At 5:40, exploratory core drilling is shown. At 6:30, exploration programs are shown including at 6:43, an engineering team that maps mine development. Various drill systems are seen at 9:00, including the rotary drill. At 10:30, preparations are seen towards using explosives with the burying of dynamite and detonators for excavation. At 12:12, loading of explosives is seen with an emphasis on safe handling. At 14:51, a cage drill is shown in use allowing rocks to be drilled in the field (without being moved by shovels) for explosive removal. At 16:00, a small 4.5 yard bucket shovel is shown being used to move blast debris. At 16:00, a 6-yard loading shovel is seen. At 17:49, overburden waste from the pit is loaded on a train so that it can be moved and dumped at a remote area. At 18:50, a 13-yard shovel is seen in use with a large truck also in use. As the narrator explains, these large size equipment is needed to lower unit costs of copper, and are an economic necessity given the modern financial conditions. At 19:52, the motorized wheel principle of new types of mining trucks is seen, and the narrator comments that next generation trucks will carry over 100 tons of ore. At 22:55, a grader is seen working the mine roads, and the narrator comments about how tires wear out so quickly on the job that they account for up to 1% of mining costs. At 24:30, railroad trains are shown on the move at a mine, moving 60-125 ton per car loads. The narrator comments further on the use of railroads in pit mining. At 26:30, a large shovel is seen loading a train, sprinkling the loads with water to hold down dust. The large boulders in the loads make this type of work dangerous. At 27:16, ore loads are dumped into a crusher at a mill site. At 27:40, a rail waste dump into a slag pile is seen. At 28:00, a train-based grader is used to clear tracks of debris. The narrator notes that the mining railroads are some of the busiest in the USA and the world. At 28:44, new tracks are installed due to various demands, and mechanized railroad ballast systems are used for fast track installation. At 31:20, a skip hoist is seen being used to take ore from a deep, small pit to the surface. At 32:50, a series of leeching ponds is seen, with water percolated through the ponds to precipitate copper. At 34:00, a machine shop is seen at the mine, providing repair and maintenance services at the mine. At 35:40, a heavy repair part is unloaded at the mine using a power shovel. At 36:00, a research laboratory is seen at work, developing new uses of copper in the atomic and other industries. At 36:40, the IBM Ramac computer is seen. The IBM 305 RAMAC was the first commercial computer that used a moving-head hard disk drive (magnetic disk storage) for secondary storage. The film ends with a shot of a heap of pennies, with the narrator noting that the industry is working hard to expand production to fulfill future needs. The Bingham Canyon Mine, more commonly known as Kennecott Copper Mine, is extracting a large porphyry copper deposit southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, in the Oquirrh Mountains. The mine is the largest man-made excavation in the world and produced more copper than any other mine in history – more than 19 million tons. The mine has been in production since 1906, and has resulted in the creation of a pit over 0.6 miles (970 m) deep, 2.5 miles (4 km) wide, and covering 1,900 acres (770 ha). Marion Power Shovel Company was an American firm that designed, manufactured and sold steam shovels, power shovels, blast hole drills, excavators, and dragline excavators. The company was a major supplier of shovels for the construction of the Panama Canal. Founded in Marion, Ohio in August, 1884 as the Marion Steam Shovel Company, the company grew through sales and acquisitions throughout the 20th century. The company changed its name to Marion Power Shovel Company in 1946 to reflect the industry's change from steam power to diesel power. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 5532 PeriscopeFilm
There could be tears today on Capitol Hill as the families of six coal miners presumed to have died
 
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EM4594 HEADLINE: Family of mine victims call for tougher laws CAPTION: Family members of those buried in the Utah mine collapse say more needs to be done to protect miners from accidents and help families get information when accidents do happen. (Oct. 3) 2007 14:33:54 00:02:48 [Notes:ANCHOR VOICE] Video: Open with wide shot of families with pictures in front of them Track: They brought pictures of their loved ones Video: pix of mine who remain trapped underground--in Utah's Crandall Canyon Mine. Video: cover video of Sheila Phillips and spoke of the heartache and the pain SOT Sheila Phillips, mother of miner Brandon Phillips (holding her grandson Gage) 11:06 a.m. ''It's just hard to have hope and have your heart broke everyday and watch your grandson grow up without a dad. Video: wide shot of hearing A year after congress approved new mine safety laws, Family members said more is needed: Cesar Sanchez, brother of miner Manuel Sanchez 11:03 a.m. ''The company's goal is production over safety--with this company the number one goal is cut coal.'' Wendy Black, wife of miner Dale 'Bird' Black 11:15 a.m. ''it would have taken just msha official or one official from the company to have saved my husband's life. which one wasn't doing their job. Video: video of mine The hearing comes a day after it was revealed that one federal agency was unaware of another agency's concerns about structural problems at the mine. -0-0-0-0-0-0-MIGHT WANT TO INCLUDE THIS AS WELL, THOUGHT IT ADDS SOME TIME : wide shot of hearing; Family members also said what they believe was a warning sign 5 months earlier--a spontaneous explosion caused by pressure--went unheeded: Kristin Kimber, ex-wife of Brandon Phillips SOT: 11:37 ''they were told to go mining, and so I feel there was a lot this mountain was telling these people that this is not right. 06 SECS END OPTIONAL MATERIAL Video: wide shot of hearing A Mine industry officials says the industry is moving toward a culture of prevention: Bruce Watzman, v-p of safety and health, National Mining Association: 1:09 p.m. ''This industry does put the safety of its people first and foremost.'' standup close But lawmakers made clear they are skeptical of that claim--noting there are huge gaps in the safety upgrades they approved and what's actually been implemented. The nine deaths at the Utah mine are more than a third of the coal mining deaths that have occurred in the u-s this year jb the ap capitol hill STORYLINE You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/264993d7b3c4ae221bedee1b5e3a79b6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 31 AP Archive
Touring the Utah Midland Railway
 
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The Utah Midland is a twenty mile shortline that hauls coal from the mines in Spring Canyon. The HO scale occupies 13 by 30 feet of Al Lindop’s basement. The extraordinary three times around dogbone track allows for an excessive amount of track in a dense area. The track plan is unbelievable, and Al continues to improve it. Over the past 20 years, the layout has been revised and remodeled several times. Following the Voyage of the Utah Midland In part two of the 7-part Utah Midland Railway series, Allen Keller narrates the journey of an engine as it begins its motion out of Spring Canyon. The engine makes its way through Tanner’s Cut, Miller Pass, and Lockwood. The engine passes by several large coal mines, a miner supply company, miner shacks, and a few stores before the line loops under itself and returns Spring Canyon Yard. Allen provides a first-hand look into the Utah Midland. You’ll get a glimpse at the track, the scratch built mines, and the sandstone cliffs. In the part three of the 7-part Utah Midland series, Allen recounts the operations of the Utah Midland as it travels the lines throughout the day. For more of our model railroad videos, visit http://bit.ly/2dJQYFV
2017 Inductee, Gary Goldberg, Amer. Mining Hall of Fame
 
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The Mining Foundation of the Southwest is pleased to announce that Gary J. Goldberg, President, CEO & Director, Newmont Mining Corporation, was inducted into the American Mining Hall of Fame on 2 December 2017 in Tucson, Arizona. Gary J. Goldberg was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer and joined the Board of Directors of Newmont Mining Corporation on March 1, 2013. He previously served as President and Chief Operating Officer since July 2012 and as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer since December 2011. Newmont is a leading mining company with gold and copper operations in the United States, Australia, Ghana, Peru and Suriname. The company is headquartered in Denver, Colorado, and has about 28,000 employees and contractors worldwide. Goldberg is credited with turning Newmont’s performance around through a disciplined focus on value over volume. The company now leads the gold sector in value creation and growth potential. This performance is the result of successful efforts to improve underlying costs, efficiencies and technical performance; to optimize the company’s asset portfolio and growth pipeline; and to strengthen the balance sheet. Newmont has also reduced its injury rates by 52 percent, improved its social and environmental standards and practices, and increased female and national representation in its workforce under Goldberg’s leadership. He received a lifetime achievement award for his contribution to safety in the mining industry from the Society of Metallurgical Engineers in 2014. Prior to joining Newmont, Goldberg gained more than 30 years’ experience in the mining industry through leadership roles in coal, gold, copper and industrial minerals businesses. Before joining Newmont, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Rio Tinto Minerals (RTM), where he was responsible for 19 mines and 29 processing facilities producing industrial mineral products. During his time at RTM, he improved earnings by 50 percent and reduced workplace injuries by 40 percent. He also served as Chairman of the National Mining Association in the United States from 2008 to 2010, where he led the CEO's Safety Task Force and launched the CORESafety® initiative, with an aggressive goal of eliminating fatalities and reducing mining’s injury rate by 50 percent over the next five years. Prior to this appointment, Goldberg served as President and CEO of US Borax. During his tenure, Borax was twice named the safest large mining operation in the United States by the federal Mine Safety & Health Administration and became the first mining company to receive the California Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Award. He was also appointed to the Board of Directors of the California Climate Action Registry following Borax being named the first mining company to report its emissions and one of only 40 companies statewide to earn the distinction of Climate Action Leader™ under this rigorous program. Before joining the industrial minerals sector, Goldberg was Managing Director of Coal & Allied Industries Limited in New South Wales, Australia, one of the world’s leading coal businesses. Under Goldberg’s direction, Coal & Allied received a national environmental award for its work to restore native habitats and achieve sustainable land use in Australia. He served as director of Port Waratah Coal Services in Newcastle as well as the Australian Coal Association Sustainable Development Program Ltd., and as a member of the New South Wales Minerals Council. Goldberg was also appointed to the Australian Government’s Business Roundtable on Sustainable Development. Prior to his appointment as head of Coal & Allied, Goldberg was President and Chief Executive Officer of Kennecott Energy, headquartered in Gillette, Wyoming. He held numerous other leadership roles throughout the Rio Tinto Group, including Mining Manager for Kennecott Utah Copper; General Manager of Colowyo Coal Company; and Mining Executive reporting to the Chief Executive of Rio Tinto’s Gold and Other Minerals product group based in London, England. Goldberg holds a bachelor’s of science degree in Mining Engineering from the University of Wisconsin – Platteville, and a master’s of business administration degree from the University of Utah.
Views: 397 MiningFoundationSW
Utah Mining ads with Rod Taylor
 
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(Re-uploading with correct file!) In 1977, Rod Taylor took part in a promotional campaign for Utah Development Company, a U.S.-controlled operation that was the biggest exporter of coal from Australia. He made four television commercials with the theme "Utah: We are backing Australia" that started airing on Jan. 16, 1977. However, the ads were not received well and were pulled. Utah's mining operations and financial dealings were the subject of an hour-long Australian news program, "Four Corners," on Nov. 4, 1977. This video is a combination of clips from the "Four Corners" broadcast and segments from 35mm workprints without audio. For more information, please visit http://www.rodtaylorsite.com/utah.shtml
Views: 62 Rod Taylor Site
EXCLUSIVE: CCTV footage from Soma mining disaster - BBC News
 
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This is some of the video evidence that will be used in the trial of 45 people accused over Turkey's worst mining disaster, obtained exclusively by BBC Turkish. The CCTV footage shows how some of the victims were preparing for work that day, and it also shows how the rescue operation took place. The BBC's Rengin Arslan was the first reporter on the site a year ago when the accident took place and describes the footage. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Views: 20924 BBC News
Underground Coal Mining
 
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A view from the drivers seat going into a mine where they use the room & pillar mining technique and another clip showing the longwall mining operation.
Views: 123158 MineralsInYourLife
Kennecott Copper railroad at Bingham Canyon open pit mine, Utah, 1995
 
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Video shots, taken in May, 1995, of railroad train activity in and around the world's largest open pit strip mine of the Kennecott Copper Co. Kennecott ceased removing copper ore by rail from the Bingham mine in 2001 when a conveyor belt system was put into operation to transport the ore to nearby processing facilities. The diesel locomotives seen are Electro Motive (EMD) GP39-2 models.
Views: 7474 Dan Uscian
Coal 2
 
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Blaine Fillmore talks about working at the Bronco Utah Mine near Emery on Mar 29, 2017.
Views: 130 Jeffrey Allred
MIKE DMITRICH, DOGM Statewide Oral History Project
 
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Born into a family of miners and raised in a coal mining community, Mike's long involvement with the mining industry in Utah began as an underground miner, moved into the role of government affairs specialist for a variety of mining companies, and finally included several decades in the State Legislature. Mike discusses his government affairs role and his concern over the possible impacts federal rules could have on Utah's coal industry. He also talks about how he was able to influence state and federal rules from his chair in the legislature. Among the discussion points are MSHA rules, taxes on coal production, compliance with the Surface Mining Act and Environmental Protection Agency regulations, the marketability of Utah coal, and the establishment of the current Abandoned Mines Program within the Utah Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining. Interspersed throughout the interview are Mike's observations about growing up in coal-rich Carbon County, Utah. For more visit our Mining History page: http://linux3.ogm.utah.gov/WebStuff/wwwroot/amr/miningHistory.html
Views: 292 Utah DOGM
Driving up to Sufco Coal Mine near Emery Utah Empty.
 
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I drove up that hill 13 times starting at 11:30pm and ending my shift at 1:00pm. Most of the night it was about 10 degrees.
Crews drill to within few hundred feet of 6 trapped miners
 
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1. Wide of a truck driving through darkness inside mine 2. Shot of the mine's walls as the truck drives in tunnel 3. Medium shot of the red lights on the top of the truck, another vehicle's lights in front 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bob Murray, Chairman of Murray Energy Corporation: "Again I want to emphasise to you, the fact that we don't get to the miners for say a week doesn't mean anything to their welfare. These bore holes hopefully will access them in six hours, and the larger bore hole tomorrow, and through those bore holes we will provide communications, ventilation, sustenance, anything they need to keep them alive indefinitely." 5. Driving tight shot of the roof of the mine with light playing on it, another vehicle passes by 6. Mine owner Bob Murray talking to journalists being given a tour of the mine 7. Rear shot Murray walking through the mine 8. Vehicle driving in the mine 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Bob Murray, Chairman of Murray Energy Corporation: "No mistakes have been made at all so far in this recovery, it's just going too slow, just too slow." 10. Murray and journalists walking in the mine 11. Medium shot of coal on a mining vehicle 12. Wide shot of coal on a mining vehicle 13. Medium of man driving a mining vehicle 14. Tight shot of a hand turning a knob on a vehicle 15. Tight shot of coal 16. Various pans of mine wall STORYLINE: Efforts continued on Thursday to make two boreholes to reach six miners trapped underground at a mine in Huntingdon, in the US state of Utah. Rough, uneven terrain has extended by nearly 400 feet (121 metres) the distance rigs must drill to reach the location where the six miners were believed to be trapped, but rescuers were still expecting to make contact by Thursday, officials said. The drill had reached 1,530 feet (466 metres) by Thursday morning, said Bob Murray, chairman of Murray Energy Corporation, which has a 50 per cent ownership stake in the Crandall Canyon mine. "These bore holes hopefully will access them in six hours, and the larger bore hole tomorrow, and through those bore holes we will provide communications, ventilation, sustenance, anything they need to keep them alive indefinitely," said Murray. "Again I want to emphasise to you, the fact that we don't get to the miners for say a week doesn't mean anything to their welfare," he said. Allyn Davis of the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) said the smaller bore hole, which is to bring a microphone and camera into the cavity, must be drilled 1,869 feet (569 metres), not 1,500 feet (457 metres) the depth of the trapped miners. A larger hole, just under 9 inches in diameter, to bring food and water, must be drilled 1,886 feet (575 metres), Davis said. That drill had advanced at least 355 feet (108 metres). Davis said families were being briefed after a night of significant progress. Efforts to clear rubble blocking a tunnel to the miners also made steady progress, advancing 180 feet (33 metres), said Richard Stickler, the head of MSHA. The miners were believed to be about 3.25 miles (5.2 kilometres) from the entrance to the mine. The miners' families have been receiving private briefings from Murray, who said he took two relatives of the trapped men underground on Wednesday to show them the rescue efforts. Murray's company has 19 mines in five states, according to an Associated Press review of federal records. At Crandall Canyon mine, the safety record was remarkably good, said R. Larry Grayson, a professor of mining engineering at Penn State University. In a narrow canyon surrounded by the Manti-La Sal National Forest, two parallel shafts lead deep into the mine, linked by smaller tunnels about every 130 feet (40 metres). You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ef57baf8998e3ed427975c84d87af615 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 685 AP Archive
J. Brett Harvey: Coal and Gas for the Future
 
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Carnegie Mellon University's top-ranked College of Engineering continued its successful Leadership Speakers Series by hosting CONSOL Energy Inc.'s Chairman and CEO J. Brett Harvey, who discussed "CONSOL Energy's Approach to Powering America: Coal and Gas for the Future." Prior to joining CONSOL, Harvey was president and chief executive officer of PacificCorp Energy Inc., a subsidiary of PacifiCorp, one of the nation's largest electric utility companies. A fourth-generation coal miner, Harvey began his career in 1979 with Kaiser Steel Company as a longwall supervisor at the company's Sunnyside Mine in Utah. He advanced to mining superintendent in 1980 and became the mine's general manager in 1982. Two years later, he was elected vice president and general manager of Kaiser Coal of New Mexico. He is now chairman of CONSOL Energy's Board of Directors. In 2003, Harvey received the prestigious Percy Nicholls Award jointly conferred by the Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Inc. and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He holds a bachelor's degree in mining engineering from the University of Utah and in 2000 was the recipient of the John E. Willson Distinguished Alumnus Award. Following Harvey's keynote speech, an expert energy panel discussed critical energy issues. Pradeep K. Khosla, the Dowd University Professor and dean of CMU's College of Engineering, moderated the panel which included: Scott Klara, deputy director of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); CMU's Kelvin Gregory, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering; and CMU's Edward S. Rubin, the Alumni Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science and a professor of engineering and public policy and mechanical engineering. The Carnegie Mellon Engineering Leadership Speakers Series serves as a catalyst for bringing international industry leaders to campus to discuss critical issues from energy and the environment to public policy and cybersecurity. For more, visit: www.cmu.cit.edu
Joy 100: Innovating the shuttle car | Komatsu
 
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Joy has been an innovative brand that has been dedicated to serving the underground mining industry for the past century. As the brand celebrates its 100-year anniversary, we take a look back on some of game-changing innovations, like the shuttle car, brought to you by Joy. Learn more about the 100 year history of Joy - https://mining.komatsu/company/our-company/who-we-are/our-brands/joy
Views: 1348 Komatsu Mining Corp.
2017 Inductee, Gary J. Goldberg, Amer. Mining Hall of Fame
 
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The Mining Foundation of the Southwest is pleased to announce that Gary J. Goldberg, President, CEO & Director, Newmont Mining Corporation, was inducted into the American Mining Hall of Fame on 2 December 2017 in Tucson, Arizona. Gary J. Goldberg was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer and joined the Board of Directors of Newmont Mining Corporation on March 1, 2013. He previously served as President and Chief Operating Officer since July 2012 and as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer since December 2011. Newmont is a leading mining company with gold and copper operations in the United States, Australia, Ghana, Peru and Suriname. The company is headquartered in Denver, Colorado, and has about 28,000 employees and contractors worldwide. Goldberg is credited with turning Newmont’s performance around through a disciplined focus on value over volume. The company now leads the gold sector in value creation and growth potential. This performance is the result of successful efforts to improve underlying costs, efficiencies and technical performance; to optimize the company’s asset portfolio and growth pipeline; and to strengthen the balance sheet. Newmont has also reduced its injury rates by 52 percent, improved its social and environmental standards and practices, and increased female and national representation in its workforce under Goldberg’s leadership. He received a lifetime achievement award for his contribution to safety in the mining industry from the Society of Metallurgical Engineers in 2014. Prior to joining Newmont, Goldberg gained more than 30 years’ experience in the mining industry through leadership roles in coal, gold, copper and industrial minerals businesses. Before joining Newmont, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Rio Tinto Minerals (RTM), where he was responsible for 19 mines and 29 processing facilities producing industrial mineral products. During his time at RTM, he improved earnings by 50 percent and reduced workplace injuries by 40 percent. He also served as Chairman of the National Mining Association in the United States from 2008 to 2010, where he led the CEO's Safety Task Force and launched the CORESafety® initiative, with an aggressive goal of eliminating fatalities and reducing mining’s injury rate by 50 percent over the next five years. Prior to this appointment, Goldberg served as President and CEO of US Borax. During his tenure, Borax was twice named the safest large mining operation in the United States by the federal Mine Safety & Health Administration and became the first mining company to receive the California Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Award. He was also appointed to the Board of Directors of the California Climate Action Registry following Borax being named the first mining company to report its emissions and one of only 40 companies statewide to earn the distinction of Climate Action Leader™ under this rigorous program. Before joining the industrial minerals sector, Goldberg was Managing Director of Coal & Allied Industries Limited in New South Wales, Australia, one of the world’s leading coal businesses. Under Goldberg’s direction, Coal & Allied received a national environmental award for its work to restore native habitats and achieve sustainable land use in Australia. He served as director of Port Waratah Coal Services in Newcastle as well as the Australian Coal Association Sustainable Development Program Ltd., and as a member of the New South Wales Minerals Council. Goldberg was also appointed to the Australian Government’s Business Roundtable on Sustainable Development. Prior to his appointment as head of Coal & Allied, Goldberg was President and Chief Executive Officer of Kennecott Energy, headquartered in Gillette, Wyoming. He held numerous other leadership roles throughout the Rio Tinto Group, including Mining Manager for Kennecott Utah Copper; General Manager of Colowyo Coal Company; and Mining Executive reporting to the Chief Executive of Rio Tinto’s Gold and Other Minerals product group based in London, England. Goldberg holds a bachelor’s of science degree in Mining Engineering from the University of Wisconsin – Platteville, and a master’s of business administration degree from the University of Utah.
Views: 728 MiningFoundationSW
From Sago to Utah, a History of Mine Disasters
 
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The accident in Montcoal, West Virginia, is the latest in a history of fatal mine disasters in the United States, the worst of which also took place in West Virginia and claimed the lives of 362 people. (April 6)
Views: 2453 Associated Press
WRAP Mining company: 'It's likely miners may not be found' reax, families
 
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AP Television Huntington, Utah - 19 August, 2007 1. Family members walking to news conference 2. Miners' families 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sonny Olsen, spokesman for the families: "We are at the mercies of the officials in charge and their so-called experts. Precious time is being squandered here, and we do not have time to spare. We must utilise the rescue capsule." 4. Wide shot of news conference 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sonny Olsen, spokesman for the families: "We feel that they've given up and that they are just waiting for the six miners to expire." Pool - Earlier this month 6. Underground camera video ABC - No Access North America/Internet Huntington, Utah - 19 August 2007 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rob Moore, Vice President of company that co-owns mine: "With the information from the data that we have received from the air readings, as well as the video, it is disappointing, and it's likely that these miners may not be found." AP Television Price, Utah - 19 August 2007 8. Wide pan of fundraiser for families of missing miners 9. Close up of flags at fundraising event 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kim Martino, Vox Pop: "Well, I think they're all very heroic. Anyone that would put their life on the line to go underground into an already dangerous situation, to try and help their friends and co-workers, I think they're great. It took a lot of courage." 11. Various close-ups of signs posted around fundraiser area 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Michelle Anderson, husband works as a miner: "We as Americans don't realise that every time we turn on a light switch, it's because somebody mined the coal, somebody hauled the coal, so the power plant could burn it, to make electricity for us to turn on our lights, to heat our homes, to be able to live day to day with our computers. We wouldn't have any of that." 13. Various of US flags 14. People buying tickets for fundraiser 15. Mid of woman giving out yellow ribbon bracelet STORYLINE: Six coal miners trapped in a roof-fall in Utah may never be found, officials conceded on Sunday, abandoning the optimism they've maintained publicly for nearly two weeks. Relatives responded by accusing federal officials and the mine owners of giving up too easily, to leave the men for dead. "We feel that they've given up and that they are just waiting for the six miners to expire," said Sonny Olsen, a spokesman for the families, reading from a prepared statement as about 70 relatives of the trapped miners stood behind him. The families of the missing miners demanded that rescuers immediately begin drilling a 30-inch hole into which a rescue capsule could be lowered. "We are at the mercies of the officials in charge and their so-called experts. Precious time is being squandered here, and we do not have time to spare. We must utilise the rescue capsule," Olsen said. Air quality readings from a fourth hole drilled more than 1,500 feet (457 metres) into the mountainside found insufficient oxygen to support life, and the latest efforts to signal the men were again met by silence. "It's likely these miners may not be found," said Rob Moore, vice president of Murray Energy Corporation, co-owner of the Crandall Canyon Mine. Workers have gained limited access to the mine through four boreholes in which video cameras and microphones were placed. Rescuers banged on a drill bit and set off explosives on Saturday, hoping to elicit a response from the men, but heir efforts were met with silence. Despite the setbacks, officials were planning to begin drilling a fifth borehole into the mountain, more than 2-thousand feet (609 meters) down, in another effort to find the men. "I think they're all very heroic," said Kim Martino, who attended the event. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7bac1bfea37872b47c20566485ec2620 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 2 AP Archive
Mine Diasaster 2007
 
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Utah mine accident...Six killed in collapse
DOGM JOHN MARINONI Oral History Interview
 
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Name of Informant: GIOVANNI (JOHN) MARINONI Age at Time of Interview: 100 years old Name of Mines and Dates Worked: MAPLE CREEK MINE, Carbon County, 1931-1934 SOLDIER CREEK MINE, Carbon County, 1945-1974 Summary of Interview: John's first experience with mining occurred at the Maple Creek Mine west of Helper, Utah. The coal mine was owned by Greek-Americans and 12-year old John was an Italian immigrant. After a break from mining during World War II, when John worked as a welder in the naval shipyard at Bremerton, Washington, he returned to Carbon County in 1945 to help his father and brothers at the Soldier Creek Mine. They jointly operated until 1957 when John and his brothers bought out their father and ran the mine under the name Premium Coal Company. John's mining career ended in 1974 when they sold the mine. By his admission, John did not excel at digging coal, but he was good with equipment and solving mechanical problems. The interview emphasizes learning to mine and John's efforts to improve mine processes, and provides a few stories of his experiences. For more visit our Mining History page: http://linux3.ogm.utah.gov/WebStuff/wwwroot/amr/miningHistory.html
Views: 703 Utah DOGM
Mining Claims To Open In Land Stripped From Utah National Monuments
 
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WASHINGTON — More than 2 million acres of Utah wilderness — land that President Donald Trump cut from a pair of protected national monuments — will be opened early Friday to new mining claims. Trump signed a pair of proclamations to dismantle the 1.35 million-acre Bears Ears National Monument and the 1.87 million-acre Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in December. The move is the largest reduction of national monuments in history. According to Reuters, the protections that banned new hard-rock mining claims will lift at 6 a.m. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/utah-national-monuments-mining-claims-trump_us_5a738a53e4b0905433b280dc?section=us_green http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
Views: 196 Wochit News
Coal Mining Song-Blood By The Ton 2010
 
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Blood by The Ton by Stephen Davis written about a mine disaster in Eccles WV in the early 1900's. The photos in this video are all original. They are from our family who have all been touched by Coal mining. With the disaster last week it appears not much has changed over time. The miners are sacrificed for money as the big companies continue to avoid regulations and fines. They bury towns in sludge and lethal gas as they destroy the earth and people who need it. This song is about such a disaster which happened in the early 1900's. The images are of a mining settlement , company store and the area near the mine where people lived under control of the company. They were paid in script and always ended up owing money at the end of the month. I will begin on a book soon about the life I remember as a child growing up in West Virginia. It will be tied to a series of songs about the experiences. You will be amazed at how much people stayed together in spirit through the best and the worst of times. The truly paid with Blood By The Ton.
Views: 26343 mumbleypeysteve
Montana coal mine owner announces bankruptcy filing
 
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The Westmoreland Coal Company announced Tuesday it will file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.
Views: 388 KPAX-TV
Utah Business Culture & History
 
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http://www.rockymountainbusinessculture.com/ - What is the overall business culture of the state of Utah? This video summarizes some of the state’s industry history and the current Utah business culture. Since the early 1800s, Utah residents have been heavily involved in mining. Coal mining was a very lucrative industry, especially in Carbon County. Today, the mining legacy continues as Utahns continue to mine for a wide variety of minerals including silver, gold, copper, lead, and zinc. The state has also made a name for itself with Kennecott Copper Mine. This mine is currently one of the largest open pit mining locations worldwide. Other industries, besides mining, are starting to become a growing facet of the Beehive State’s business culture. These industries include service businesses and retail. These kind of industries come in a wide variety of specializations, from contact lenses to online retailing to essential oils. The majority of these are springing up in the Wasatch Front, near the state’s capital, Salt Lake City. These businesses aren’t just making a splash on a city level or state level; many of these companies’ products and services have become popular on a national and even an international level. For more information regarding Utah business culture, visit us online.
Views: 16 John Jones
Springhill Coal Mine Disaster Nova Scotia Canada 1956
 
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This clip describes the November 1, 1956 explosion in the No. 4 mine. Fire and a methane gas explosion hindered rescue efforts so that while 88 miners were rescued, 39 died. This was the second of three major disasters in the Springhill Mines over the years beginning with the Explosion on February 21, 1891 , with a loss of 121 men and boys. The last was the Bump on October 23, 1958 which saw the loss of 75 men. The Springhill Mining Company began coal mining in Springhill Nova Scotia in 1873. By the 1880s Springhill had 5 mines in operation. The mines employed many men and young boys. Boys as young as eight years old worked in the mines until an act was passed in1923 prohibiting boys under the age of sixteen from working in the mines. A total of 424 men and boys lost their lives in the Springhill Mines from 1873 until the final closure in 1970. This is clipped from a November 5, 1956 newsreel available at the Internet Archives. For more on this mine and these disasters, go to http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/sos/002028-2100-e.html . Folksingers Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl wrote a song about the 1958 disaster titled, Springhill Mine Disaster and recorded recently by U2 and on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5iSvhoowUY . An excellent book, Last Man Out, written by Mellissa Fay in 2003 describes the final 1958 disaster and its affect on the miners and their families.
Views: 13565 markdcatlin
When coal mining companies buy a town and buy a Govt: $700k donated to LNP by New Hope
 
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10/05/14 When coal mining companies buy a town and buy a Govt: $700k donated to LNP by New Hope
Views: 497 Greenshack Dotinfo
Factory Butte Coal Mine Utah
 
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Boondocking Utah Wasn't sure what to do with this, don't want to use music too often so listen to the late Floyd Westerman speak on the world... Get your vanlife/offgrid essentials and luxuries https://www.amazon.com/ideas/amzn1.account.AG5N5H6V6ORVMUSMU4P7VQJNMF5Q/IRK3K1ABA285?ref=idea_share&_encoding=UTF8&tag=mmltravel-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=896e011021b9505e8148374916386929&camp=1789&creative=9325 Support the channel by supporting globalism consumerism here: https://www.amazon.com//ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ll2&tag=mmltravel-20&linkId=d09995088cdf3b0b0115016c1b923be0 Able bodied man #ebegging Cool kids do it so: Tag thingies?: #CamperVan #VanLife #RVLife #MMLtravels
6.5 Creedmoor Shooting 1500 Yards Uintah Precision UPR-10
 
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The Uintah Precision bolt Action AR10 upper at a distance of 1500 yards in the Utah desert. factory Hornady Match ammunition with a 140g ELD-M projectile. The rifle has a proprietary bolt and upper receiver made from one piece of 4140 steel machines by the experts with years of machinery experience from the coal mining industry. Uintah Precision is a Utah based company and uses all American materials to manufacture their uppers, from the aluminum blocks for their receiver with an integrated 20 MOA picatinny rail to the steel used on their 3 lug engaged bolts. The upper works with standard AR10 magazines and any short Action cartridge that will fit in the magazine well. Currently they offer a rifle chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor, 6 Creedmoor, .308 Winchester, and 243 Winchester. The barrels used are shillen match hand lapped barrels. The 6.5 creedmoor is offered in the 26” length with a 1:8 twist. It comes threaded with a thread protector for easy installation of a muzzle brake or suppressor. Find out more at http://uintahprecision.com/ On facebook at, https://www.facebook.com/Uintah-Precision-764878197020400/ On Instagram http://instagram.com/uintah_precision Email [email protected] Find West Desert Shooter Instagram here; http://instagram.com/westdesertshooter Amazon affiliate links anything bought from these links helps my channel and you get a great product! Doesn’t cost you extra! Scopes My #1 pick for a LR scope! Only 300$ ! SWFA SS 12X MOA https://amzn.to/2Lpxlln ! ! SWFA SS 12X MIL https://amzn.to/2LnAsdq ! My Vortex scope https://amzn.to/2SadJ78 New model PST scope https://amzn.to/2R3IOft Rifle accessories Vortex bubble level https://amzn.to/2S4mWOt Caldwell pivot bipod https://amzn.to/2BpjuXA Fake atlas https://amzn.to/2SbryCC Nikon 4k rangefinder https://amzn.to/2GqKoUU Camo paint https://amzn.to/2BwXt99 Muzzle brakes https://amzn.to/2Sb8vIj Reloading Highly recommend! Digital reloading scale https://amzn.to/2BrexgP only 18$! Lee complete reloading kit https://amzn.to/2UUtjpl Lee ultimate dies https://amzn.to/2QBrRcW Lyman chamfer tool kit https://amzn.to/2rJB0RO Universal Reloading tray https://amzn.to/2BvZsdQ Target shoot n see targets https://amzn.to/2Buu4fV How I survive the Desert climate! Personal Favorite! Carhartt hoodie https://amzn.to/2QIUOE9 Carhartt Full swing steel Coat https://amzn.to/2LtpB1S Carhartt coveralls https://amzn.to/2Ls6vZC Backpack Velox 2 https://amzn.to/2Cl2WBQ Edge glasses https://amzn.to/2S7F9up Shemagh scarf https://amzn.to/2BwX8mT Sun hat https://amzn.to/2BrbN37
Views: 6317 West Desert Shooter
Innovation in mining
 
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A brief 2 minute introductory video of EnviroLeach's revolutionary technology and how it can benefit the mining sector. #DirsuptMining 2018 Website: https://enviroleach.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnviroLeach Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnviroLeach
Views: 122731 EnviroLeach Technologies
Sego Canyon and Coal Mines - on the way to Zion
 
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Sego has a history unlike most ghost towns in Utah. Its history is surrounded by coal and not gold or silver. A rancher named Harry Ballard made the discovery in the early 1890s. Ballard bought the land surrounding his find and started operations on a small scale. In 1911, Ballard sold the mine to a group of Salt Lake City investors. Production started with grand plans for a long and prosperous run of coal production. The new owners built a store, a boarding house and other buildings all with their own water supply. Trouble started almost immediately when the water supply started to dry up. There were other problems as well, all of which contributed to little or no profit for the investors. Some miners were not paid for as long as a year but received script, which enabled them to buy food and other necessities for their families from the company store. In 1933, the miners agreed to become members of the United Mine Workers Union. On November 1,1947, the mine was closed and the property sold at auction. -http://climb-utah.com/Moab/sego.htm
Views: 93 Jeff Dillavou