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Search results “Breccia pipe uranium mining”
"Tourmaline Breccia Pipes Project" Greg McCoach and David Kelley of Chakana Copper Corp.
 
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Greg McCoach, The Mining Speculator and David Kelley, CEO, President & Director of Chakana Copper Corp. sit down at the May 2018 Metals Investor Forum in Vancouver. ________________________________________________________________ The companies presenting at the Metals Investor Forum are as vetted as it gets – they have already cleared the high hurdle of earning the coverage from the newsletter writers’ as companies with excellent management teams, great financials and promising properties. All newsletter writers’ stress that the first quality on that list – excellent management – is essential to the success of a junior mining company. The problem is that it’s hard to assess management without being able to look them in the eye and ask the questions that matter to you. The Metals Investor Forum gives you that time. Subscribe to our channel to stay up to date on the latest insights moving the metals markets. For more breaking news, visit https://metalsinvestorforum.com Follow us on social media: Twitter - https://twitter.com/metalsinvestorf LinkedIn - https://ca.linkedin.com/company/metals-investor-forum Don’t forget to sign up for Metals Investor Forum’s Video Library: https://www.metalsinvestorforum.com/videos Stay connected by subscribing to Metals Investor Forum’s Newsletter: https://www.metalsinvestorforum.com/newsletter-subscribe
AZ Mining Review 06-24-2015 (episode 30)
 
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Table of contents: 00:00 Arizona Mining Update with Nyal Niemuth 5:30 New Breccia Pipe Compilation Databases for Northwestern Arizona with Jon Spencer (AZGS Senior Geologist) 19:10 U.S. Mineral Resources & Needs – George Love (former Pennsylvania State Geologist)
Orphan Mine Uraninite Crystal and Vintage NCA Scaler
 
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This is a demonstration of my NCA General Scaler-Ratemeter Model RCR-1 and a large uraninite crystal that I found in an Orphan Mine dump outside the Grand Canyon. The famous Orphan Mine near the Visitor Center at the Grand Canyon National Park is off limits now, though in its mining days from the 1900's till 1969, it produced some of the highest grade ore in Arizona. This ore is also very colorful and is associated copper minerals as well. The Orphan Mine is a breccia pipe filled with copper minerals and also large amounts of uranium leached out of the Triassic Era Chinle formation. Not much of the Chinle remains today as it was eroded away ages ago, but sedement from it was deposited in a so called "pipe" in the Permian era limestone beneath it. The result is a plethora of amazing minerals, but the most amazing to me is what the mine is famous for... uranium. In this demo, I am showing the activity of one of my best finds. A 1" x 1" x 7/8" uraninite crystal coated with malachite. This is an exceptionally large crystal for this type of uranium, and is very rare in this size. It is also very "hot."
Views: 378 SRSchoner
Atlantic Gold Is The Lowest Cost Gold Producer in the Sector
 
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Atlantic Gold (TSX-V: AGB)(OTC: SPVEF) Chairman Steven Dean touts his company’s low cost production, expansion from 90,000 to 250,000 ounces of annual gold production, and discusses the current expansion drilling and whether the company will be acquired.
Views: 894 Outsider Club
Excelsior Mining expects pivotal 2019 as project moves towards production
 
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Excelsior Mining President and CEO Stephen Twyerould spoke with Steve Darling from Proactive Investors at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference. The company is advancing the Gunnison Copper Project in Cochise County, Arizona.
“Exciting findings from hole 26 & 30” Joe Mazumdar talks to John Black, CEO of Regulus Resources.
 
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John Black, CEO & Director of Regulus Resources and Joe Mazumdar of Exploration Insights discuss the company’s flagship project - AntaKori, located in Peru at the Metals Investor Forum on May 24-25, 2019 in Vancouver, BC. TSX.V REG ____________________________________________________________ The companies presenting at the Metals Investor Forum are as vetted as it gets – they have already cleared the high hurdle of earning the coverage from the newsletter writers’ as companies with excellent management teams, great financials and promising properties. All newsletter writers’ stress that the first quality on that list – excellent management – is essential to the success of a junior mining company. The problem is that it’s hard to assess management without being able to look them in the eye and ask the questions that matter to you. The Metals Investor Forum gives you that time. Subscribe to our channel to stay up to date on the latest insights moving the metals markets. For more breaking news, visit https://metalsinvestorforum.com Follow us on social media: Twitter - https://twitter.com/MetalsInvtForum LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/metals-investor-forum/?originalSubdomain=ca Don’t forget to sign up for Metals Investor Forum’s Video Library: https://metalsinvestorforum.com/media/
CEO Interview Series, PDAC 2018 in Toronto , Mickey Fulp with Gold Mining’s Amir Adnani
 
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Mickey Fulp, the Mercenary Geologist sits down with Gold Mining's Chairman & Founder Amir Adnani at the Toronto PDAC 2018.
Views: 5515 MiningClips
Geology professor confirms Zenyatta's graphite deposit is 'special and rare'
 
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March 14, 2014 -- Dr. Andrew Conly, associate professor at the Department of Geology at Lakehead University, spoke to Tracy Weslosky, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of InvestorIntel, about the unique Albany deposit in central Ontario, being developed by Zenyatta Ventures (TSXV: ZEN | OTCQX: ZENYF). Dr. Conly has advised Zenyatta since 2011 and the Government of Canada has awarded a collaborative research grant through the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council ('NSERC') to assist Dr. Andrew Conly's study of the Albany deposit. Zenyatta was also recently granted support from the National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program for metallurgical testing. Dr. Conly observed, "The Albany deposit is what we call a 'breccia' graphite deposit; to the best of my knowledge, there's nothing else out there. This is a potential world-class deposit; it is unique in terms of its geological simplicity and how it's formed; it is unique compared to any other graphite deposit." The research at the Albany hydrothermal deposit will help to create the first genetic model for this special variety of graphite. The importance of the Albany deposit's characteristics for investors, who may not be geologists, is that it has a very high carbon graphitic content; in other words, it is pure enough to compete with synthetic graphite. Dr. Conly confirms that Zenyatta's target customers are the ones who have, until recently, had no alternative to synthetic graphite. "That's the market they would be going after, replacing the synthetic graphite market with a natural occurring, high grade, high purity natural graphite. When you look at it, the benefits of that are phenomenal; is that it's cheaper to produce natural graphite....So far the processing has been highly successful in getting a nice high-grade, pure product with minimal cost and minimal detrimental environmental effects." Indeed, compared to synthetic graphite, which is a petroleum by-product with "astronomical" costs to process, the graphite from Zenyatta's Albany deposit is difficult to beat. Dr. Conly adds that most graphite deposits involve amorphous or flake type, and that they are making many efforts to show that graphite companies are trying to show how their graphite could be purified to reach Zenyatta's purity. However, that would require more refining and may still lack the quality of Zenyatta's deposit. Quality and purity are very important to the targeted end users in the green technology and clean-tech sectors. The Albany deposit's purity, therefore, allows Zenyatta to set ambitious sales targets, lithium-ion batteries, pebble nuclear reactors, solar power capacitors, wind power generators and graphene. Dr. Conly suggests that the very uniqueness of the Albany deposit has compelled Zenyatta to perform a lot of 'homework' to provide investor confidence. He says "that's something they've done from their academic studies with me to all their testing and their product and they have taken a very systematic approach to ensure what they're saying is backed up by sound science...and investors in today's climate still seem weary, but you have a company that is really doing its homework to ensure that this will go to development". For investors, this means that Zenyatta's graphite will command high prices. Disclaimer: Zenyatta Ventures is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel. To access the full Disclaimer for ProEdge Media Corp., please go to the following URL: disclaimer link: http://investorintel.com/?disclaimer=1
Views: 2965 InvestorIntel
#Vuglife What its like to find crystals
 
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Got into a Vug of crystals at Hansen creek! Please Subscribe to my Channel and also follow me - Cowboywade on Instagram, I have an Ebay Page ( https://www.ebay.com/usr/r2ws ) set up too For some of my finds, some of my art and some Logo accessories!
Views: 257 Skunklchuck
Gyeongju
 
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Gyeongju, historically known as "Seorabeol", is a coastal city in the far southeastern corner of North Gyeongsang Province in South Korea. It is the second largest city by area in the province after Andong, covering 1,324 km2 with a population of 264,091 people Gyeongju is 370 km southeast of Seoul, and 55 km east of the provincial capital, Daegu. The city borders Cheongdo and Yeongcheon to the west, Ulsan to the south and Pohang to the north, while to the east lies the coast of the Sea of Japan. Numerous low mountains—outliers of the Taebaek range—are scattered around the city. Gyeongju was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Silla which ruled about two-thirds of the Korean Peninsula between the 7th and 9th centuries. A vast number of archaeological sites and cultural properties from this period remain in the city. Gyeongju is often referred to as "the museum without walls". Among such historical treasures, Seokguram grotto, Bulguksa temple, Gyeongju Historic Areas and Yangdong Folk Village are designated as World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. The many major historical sites have helped Gyeongju become one of the most popular tourist destinations in South Korea. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 99 Audiopedia
Tuff
 
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Tuff is a type of rock made of volcanic ash ejected from a vent during a volcanic eruption. Following ejection and deposition, the ash is compacted into a solid rock in a process called consolidation. Tuff is sometimes called tufa, particularly when used as construction material, although tufa also refers to a quite different rock. Rock that contains greater than 50% tuff is considered tuffaceous. Tuff is a relatively soft rock, so it has been used for construction since ancient times. Since it is common in Italy the Romans used it often for construction. The Rapa Nui people used it to make most of the moai statues in Easter Island. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 339 Audiopedia
В ЭТО НЕВОЗМОЖНО ПОВЕРИТЬ. Патомский Кратер Это Новая Тайна Сибири. 4K Video
 
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В это невозможно поверить не увидев. Огромный Патомский Кратер Это Новая Тайна Сибири. 4K Video. ГРЕЧКА С КУРИЦЕЙ:► https://youtu.be/X7h8qf4ZsNE ✫Все Тайные Знания Мира:►https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYKlPklrpxk&list=PLeOU_cvnnH-aI5iDy9-QueLJWWhGEvmO9 ✫Подписаться на канал:►https://goo.gl/1fvEiz Патомский кратер это странный конус из раздробленных известняковых глыб на склоне горы Патомского нагорья в Бодайбинском районе Иркутской области. Среди местного населения носит название «Гнездо огненного орла» известен также под названиями «Конус Колпакова», «Джебульдинский кратер», «Явальдинский кратер». Патомский кратер, уникальный по своим характеристикам геологический объект, представляет собой кольцевую структуру центрального типа с насыпным конусом, сложенным известняками и другими горными породами. Патомский кратер формировался в течение продолжительного времени около 500 лет назад. Тайные Знания для вас! Поделитесь моим видео в соц сетях, с родными, друзьями и знакомыми. Люди имееют право знать все точки зрения. #Патомский #кратер #TainaRVB Источник: https://goo.gl/TbnnYD https://goo.gl/56yeZ2 Интересное на канале Тайные Знания:► КОМНАТНЫЙ АТОМНЫЙ ГЕНЕРАТОР: https://youtu.be/BTQvLtLHCZI ЗАПРЕЩЕННЫЙ ГЕНЕРАТОР: https://youtu.be/I6ZhE8Zq6hQ Правда о КРЕЩЕНИИ Руси: https://youtu.be/Jd9c38ZvdVA ЧТО ЕЛИ ДРЕВНИЕ РУСЫ: https://youtu.be/HBxgG1qbeRs ★Я в Социальных сетях!↓★ FaceBook:► https://www.facebook.com/groups/1632724023442748/ Наш Телеграм:► https://t.me/TainaRVB Яндекс.Дзен:► https://zen.yandex.ru/id/5ab8e529bcf1bced9ad25917 12+
Andrew Hall: Electric Earth | EU2017
 
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The surface of the Earth is a canvas that portrays the artistry and power of the forces that created it. Electric Earth presents a theory of the mechanisms of past cataclysm and how they relate to the forces we see at work in nature today. Through the unfiltered lens of Electric Universe cosmology, the raw workings of nature will be examined, and evidence presented to show its effect on the land. Lightning bolts of immense proportion, arcs from the interior of the Earth, shock waves caused by whirlwinds of supersonic velocity left their mark for us to see. This presentation will show you how to see this for yourself. Andrew Hall is a natural philosopher, engineer, and writer. A graduate of the University of Arizona’s Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering College, he spent thirty years in the energy industry. He has designed, consulted, managed and directed the construction and operation of over two and a half gigawatts of power generation and transmission, including solar, gasification and natural gas power systems. From his home in Arizona, he explores the mountains, canyons, volcanoes, and deserts of the American Southwest to understand and rewrite an interpretation of Earth’s form in its proper electrical context. He is writing a book online titled “Trailer Park Cosmology” that he welcomes EU enthusiasts to preview and comment as it is written. https://andrewdhall.wordpress.com/ If you see a CC with this video, it means that subtitles are available. To find out which ones, click on the Gear Icon in the lower right area of the video box and click on “subtitles” in the drop-down box. Then click on the subtitle that you would like. Become a Producer through the PATREON Rewards program -- https://www.patreon.com/tboltsproject Subscribe to Thunderbolts Update newsletter: http://eepurl.com/ETy41 The Thunderbolts Project Home: http://www.thunderbolts.info Essential Guide to the Electric Universe: http://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/eg-contents/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thunderboltsproject Twitter: @tboltsproject Electric Universe by Wal Thornhill: http://www.holoscience.com/wp/ Electric Universe T-shirts and Gifts: http://stickmanonstone.com/
Views: 24819 ThunderboltsProject
Metals Investor Forum May 2018 - David Kelley, CEO, President & Director of Chakana Copper
 
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Company Presentation at the MIF May 25-26, 2018 Forum in Vancouver: David Kelley, CEO, President & Director of Chakana Copper. ________________________________________________________________ The companies presenting at the Metals Investor Forum are as vetted as it gets – they have already cleared the high hurdle of earning the coverage from the newsletter writers’ as companies with excellent management teams, great financials and promising properties. All newsletter writers’ stress that the first quality on that list – excellent management – is essential to the success of a junior mining company. The problem is that it’s hard to assess management without being able to look them in the eye and ask the questions that matter to you. The Metals Investor Forum gives you that time. Subscribe to our channel to stay up to date on the latest insights moving the metals markets. For more breaking news, visit https://metalsinvestorforum.com Follow us on social media: Twitter - https://twitter.com/metalsinvestorf LinkedIn - https://ca.linkedin.com/company/metals-investor-forum Don’t forget to sign up for Metals Investor Forum’s Video Library: https://www.metalsinvestorforum.com/videos Stay connected by subscribing to Metals Investor Forum’s Newsletter: https://www.metalsinvestorforum.com/newsletter-subscribe
Inside USGS, No. 2, Patrick Muffler, Yellowstone
 
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http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/846 USGS emeritus geologist Patrick Muffler describes his career working on Yellowstone geysers and hydrothermal systems from the 1960's through 2014. Patrick's work along with his USGS colleagues revealed the details of Yellowstone's explosive volcanic past and how its spectacular geysers and other hydrothermal features work.
Views: 4524 USGS
Rare-earth elements | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare-earth_element 00:01:52 1 List 00:02:24 2 Abbreviations 00:02:56 3 Discovery and early history 00:03:00 3.1 Spectroscopy 00:06:01 3.2 Early classification 00:10:13 3.3 Light versus heavy classification 00:11:43 4 Origin 00:13:59 5 Geological distribution 00:14:45 6 Geochemistry applications 00:22:31 7 Global rare-earth production 00:26:55 7.1 China 00:29:30 7.2 Outside of China 00:32:43 7.2.1 Malaysian refining plans 00:36:15 7.3 Other sources 00:38:38 7.3.1 Recycling 00:40:16 8 Uses 00:41:13 9 Environmental considerations 00:43:22 9.1 Consequences and remediation 00:45:50 9.2 Environmental pollution 00:48:00 9.2.1 Impact on vegetation 00:48:30 9.2.2 Impact on human health 00:50:13 9.2.3 Impact on animal health 00:53:13 10 Geo-political considerations 00:54:53 11 See also 01:00:02 12 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9636042857170163 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A rare-earth element (REE) or rare-earth metal (REM), as defined by IUPAC, is one of a set of seventeen chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the fifteen lanthanides, as well as scandium and yttrium. Scandium and yttrium are considered rare-earth elements because they tend to occur in the same ore deposits as the lanthanides and exhibit similar chemical properties, but have different electronic and magnetic properties. Rarely, a broader definition that includes actinides may be used, since the actinides share some mineralogical, chemical, and physical (especially electron shell configuration) characteristics.The 17 rare-earth elements are cerium (Ce), dysprosium (Dy), erbium (Er), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), lanthanum (La), lutetium (Lu), neodymium (Nd), praseodymium (Pr), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), scandium (Sc), terbium (Tb), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb), and yttrium (Y). Despite their name, rare-earth elements are – with the exception of the radioactive promethium – relatively plentiful in Earth's crust, with cerium being the 25th most abundant element at 68 parts per million, more abundant than copper. However, because of their geochemical properties, rare-earth elements are typically dispersed and not often found concentrated in rare-earth minerals; as a result economically exploitable ore deposits are less common. The first rare-earth mineral discovered (1787) was gadolinite, a mineral composed of cerium, yttrium, iron, silicon, and other elements. This mineral was extracted from a mine in the village of Ytterby in Sweden; four of the rare-earth elements bear names derived from this single location.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Rare earths | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare-earth_element 00:01:57 1 List 00:02:28 2 Abbreviations 00:03:02 3 Discovery and early history 00:03:06 3.1 Spectroscopy 00:06:14 3.2 Early classification 00:10:32 3.3 Light versus heavy classification 00:12:05 4 Origin 00:14:27 5 Geological distribution 00:15:13 6 Geochemistry applications 00:23:13 7 Global rare-earth production 00:27:44 7.1 China 00:30:23 7.2 Outside of China 00:33:42 7.2.1 Malaysian refining plans 00:37:20 7.3 Other sources 00:39:49 7.3.1 Recycling 00:41:28 8 Uses 00:42:25 9 Environmental considerations 00:44:37 9.1 Consequences and remediation 00:47:09 9.2 Environmental pollution 00:49:25 9.2.1 Impact on vegetation 00:49:55 9.2.2 Impact on human health 00:51:40 9.2.3 Impact on animal health 00:54:44 10 Geo-political considerations 00:56:26 11 See also 01:01:44 12 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9525295112954858 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A rare-earth element (REE) or rare-earth metal (REM), as defined by IUPAC, is one of a set of seventeen chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the fifteen lanthanides, as well as scandium and yttrium. Scandium and yttrium are considered rare-earth elements because they tend to occur in the same ore deposits as the lanthanides and exhibit similar chemical properties, but have different electronic and magnetic properties. Rarely, a broader definition that includes actinides may be used, since the actinides share some mineralogical, chemical, and physical (especially electron shell configuration) characteristics.The 17 rare-earth elements are cerium (Ce), dysprosium (Dy), erbium (Er), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), lanthanum (La), lutetium (Lu), neodymium (Nd), praseodymium (Pr), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), scandium (Sc), terbium (Tb), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb), and yttrium (Y). Despite their name, rare-earth elements are – with the exception of the radioactive promethium – relatively plentiful in Earth's crust, with cerium being the 25th most abundant element at 68 parts per million, more abundant than copper. However, because of their geochemical properties, rare-earth elements are typically dispersed and not often found concentrated in rare-earth minerals; as a result economically exploitable ore deposits are less common. The first rare-earth mineral discovered (1787) was gadolinite, a mineral composed of cerium, yttrium, iron, silicon, and other elements. This mineral was extracted from a mine in the village of Ytterby in Sweden; four of the rare-earth elements bear names derived from this single location.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
Diamond | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Diamond 00:02:00 1 Material properties 00:03:48 1.1 Thermodynamics 00:05:17 1.2 Crystal structure 00:06:12 1.3 Crystal habit 00:07:52 1.4 Mechanical properties 00:08:02 1.4.1 Hardness 00:09:39 1.4.2 Toughness 00:10:37 1.4.3 Yield strength 00:11:09 1.5 Electrical conductivity 00:11:56 1.6 Surface property 00:13:02 1.7 Chemical stability 00:13:38 1.8 Color 00:16:45 1.9 Identification 00:17:59 2 Geology 00:19:45 2.1 Surface distribution 00:22:06 2.2 Exploration 00:23:31 2.3 Ages 00:24:39 2.4 Origin in mantle 00:27:07 2.5 Carbon sources 00:28:36 2.6 Formation and growth 00:29:40 2.7 Transport to the surface 00:30:28 2.8 In space 00:31:30 3 Industry 00:31:53 3.1 Gem-grade diamonds 00:39:17 3.1.1 Cutting 00:42:05 3.1.2 Marketing 00:44:08 3.2 Industrial-grade diamonds 00:46:44 3.3 Mining 00:50:30 3.3.1 Political issues 00:52:13 4 Synthetics, simulants, and enhancements 00:52:24 4.1 Synthetics 00:54:46 4.2 Simulants 00:55:14 4.3 Enhancements 00:56:16 4.4 Identification 00:59:12 5 Stolen diamonds 01:00:41 6 History 01:02:14 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Diamond is a solid form of the element carbon with its atoms arranged in a crystal structure called diamond cubic. At room temperature and pressure, another solid form of carbon known as graphite is the chemically stable form, but diamond almost never converts to it. Diamond has the highest hardness and thermal conductivity of any natural material, properties that are utilized in major industrial applications such as cutting and polishing tools. They are also the reason that diamond anvil cells can subject materials to pressures found deep in the Earth. Because the arrangement of atoms in diamond is extremely rigid, few types of impurity can contaminate it (two exceptions being boron and nitrogen). Small numbers of defects or impurities (about one per million of lattice atoms) color diamond blue (boron), yellow (nitrogen), brown (defects), green (radiation exposure), purple, pink, orange or red. Diamond also has relatively high optical dispersion (ability to disperse light of different colors). Most natural diamonds have ages between 1 billion and 3.5 billion years. Most were formed at depths between 150 and 250 kilometers (93 and 155 mi) in the Earth's mantle, although a few have come from as deep as 800 kilometers (500 mi). Under high pressure and temperature, carbon-containing fluids dissolved minerals and replaced them with diamonds. Much more recently (tens to hundreds of million years ago), they were carried to the surface in volcanic eruptions and deposited in igneous rocks known as kimberlites and lamproites. Synthetic diamonds can be grown from high-purity carbon under high pressures and temperatures or from hydrocarbon gas by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Imitation diamonds can also be made out of materials such as cubic zirconia and silicon carbide. Natural, synthetic and imitation diamonds are most commonly distinguished using optical techniques or thermal conductivity measurements.
Views: 54 wikipedia tts
Rare-earth | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare-earth_element 00:02:06 1 List 00:02:40 2 Abbreviations 00:03:16 3 Discovery and early history 00:03:20 3.1 Spectroscopy 00:06:43 3.2 Early classification 00:11:18 3.3 Light versus heavy classification 00:13:00 4 Origin 00:15:29 5 Geological distribution 00:16:19 6 Geochemistry applications 00:24:48 7 Global rare-earth production 00:29:36 7.1 China 00:32:25 7.2 Outside of China 00:35:59 7.2.1 Malaysian refining plans 00:39:55 7.3 Other sources 00:42:32 7.3.1 Recycling 00:44:18 8 Uses 00:45:18 9 Environmental considerations 00:47:42 9.1 Consequences and remediation 00:50:23 9.2 Environmental pollution 00:52:45 9.2.1 Impact on vegetation 00:53:17 9.2.2 Impact on human health 00:55:09 9.2.3 Impact on animal health 00:58:23 10 Geo-political considerations 01:00:11 11 See also 01:05:49 12 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7990216364617967 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A rare-earth element (REE) or rare-earth metal (REM), as defined by IUPAC, is one of a set of seventeen chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the fifteen lanthanides, as well as scandium and yttrium. Scandium and yttrium are considered rare-earth elements because they tend to occur in the same ore deposits as the lanthanides and exhibit similar chemical properties, but have different electronic and magnetic properties. Rarely, a broader definition that includes actinides may be used, since the actinides share some mineralogical, chemical, and physical (especially electron shell configuration) characteristics.The 17 rare-earth elements are cerium (Ce), dysprosium (Dy), erbium (Er), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), lanthanum (La), lutetium (Lu), neodymium (Nd), praseodymium (Pr), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), scandium (Sc), terbium (Tb), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb), and yttrium (Y). Despite their name, rare-earth elements are – with the exception of the radioactive promethium – relatively plentiful in Earth's crust, with cerium being the 25th most abundant element at 68 parts per million, more abundant than copper. However, because of their geochemical properties, rare-earth elements are typically dispersed and not often found concentrated in rare-earth minerals; as a result economically exploitable ore deposits are less common. The first rare-earth mineral discovered (1787) was gadolinite, a mineral composed of cerium, yttrium, iron, silicon, and other elements. This mineral was extracted from a mine in the village of Ytterby in Sweden; four of the rare-earth elements bear names derived from this single location.
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Diamond | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond 00:02:01 1 Material properties 00:03:49 1.1 Thermodynamics 00:05:18 1.2 Crystal structure 00:06:13 1.3 Crystal habit 00:07:54 1.4 Mechanical properties 00:08:03 1.4.1 Hardness 00:09:41 1.4.2 Toughness 00:10:39 1.4.3 Yield strength 00:11:10 1.5 Electrical conductivity 00:11:57 1.6 Surface property 00:13:04 1.7 Chemical stability 00:13:40 1.8 Color 00:16:47 1.9 Identification 00:18:02 2 Geology 00:19:48 2.1 Surface distribution 00:22:10 2.2 Exploration 00:23:35 2.3 Ages 00:24:43 2.4 Origin in mantle 00:27:11 2.5 Carbon sources 00:28:40 2.6 Formation and growth 00:29:45 2.7 Transport to the surface 00:30:32 2.8 In space 00:31:34 3 Industry 00:31:57 3.1 Gem-grade diamonds 00:39:23 3.1.1 Cutting 00:42:12 3.1.2 Marketing 00:44:15 3.2 Industrial-grade diamonds 00:46:51 3.3 Mining 00:50:38 3.3.1 Political issues 00:52:21 4 Synthetics, simulants, and enhancements 00:52:32 4.1 Synthetics 00:54:54 4.2 Simulants 00:55:23 4.3 Enhancements 00:56:24 4.4 Identification 00:59:20 5 Stolen diamonds 01:00:50 6 History 01:02:23 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Diamond is a solid form of the element carbon with its atoms arranged in a crystal structure called diamond cubic. At room temperature and pressure, another solid form of carbon known as graphite is the chemically stable form, but diamond almost never converts to it. Diamond has the highest hardness and thermal conductivity of any natural material, properties that are utilized in major industrial applications such as cutting and polishing tools. They are also the reason that diamond anvil cells can subject materials to pressures found deep in the Earth. Because the arrangement of atoms in diamond is extremely rigid, few types of impurity can contaminate it (two exceptions being boron and nitrogen). Small numbers of defects or impurities (about one per million of lattice atoms) color diamond blue (boron), yellow (nitrogen), brown (defects), green (radiation exposure), purple, pink, orange or red. Diamond also has relatively high optical dispersion (ability to disperse light of different colors). Most natural diamonds have ages between 1 billion and 3.5 billion years. Most were formed at depths between 150 and 250 kilometers (93 and 155 mi) in the Earth's mantle, although a few have come from as deep as 800 kilometers (500 mi). Under high pressure and temperature, carbon-containing fluids dissolved minerals and replaced them with diamonds. Much more recently (tens to hundreds of million years ago), they were carried to the surface in volcanic eruptions and deposited in igneous rocks known as kimberlites and lamproites. Synthetic diamonds can be grown from high-purity carbon under high pressures and temperatures or from hydrocarbon gas by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Imitation diamonds can also be made out of materials such as cubic zirconia and silicon carbide. Natural, synthetic and imitation diamonds are most commonly distinguished using optical techniques or thermal conductivity measurements.
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