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Growing Bacteria - Petri Dish
 
04:03
Order now at http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/search?sSearch=agar&sClass=Product&sType=&submit.x=0&submit.y=0 You can smell a good science project a block away. In this case, multiply the fun by six and you have one of our most popular science fair project kits. You'll get six large Petri dishes, 10 cm (4 in) in diameter, a microwave safe plastic beaker, cotton swabs and the highest quality nutrient agar. This is the same nutrient agar used by microbiologists to grow really funky stuff in the lab. The instructions give you great suggestions for collecting samples and ways to gross out your parents.
Views: 555635 Sick Science!
Fermentation of Yeast & Sugar - The Sci Guys: Science at Home
 
04:18
Welcome to science at home in this experiment we are exploring the fermentation between yeast and sugar. Yeast uses sugar as energy and releases carbon dioxide and ethanol as waste. Yeast and fermentation have been used for thousands of years when making bread. At the end of this episode you will be able to demonstrate fermentation, explain why yeast and fermentation make a balloon grow and explain the chemical reaction that occurs during fermentation. Help support us to do more experiments by becoming a patron on patreon: http://www.patreon.com/thesciguys Equipment and Ingredients: Water Yeast Sugar Balloons Bottles Lab Coat or Apron Gloves Goggles Previous Episode: Leidenfrost Effect: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sgk4sY9Xn1U&index=3&list=PL7VnnL-CJ-z5fZDvjxy7TATkITyw32erX Next Episode: Copper Plating: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3qhqTVssoo&index=6&list=PL7VnnL-CJ-z5fZDvjxy7TATkITyw32erX Check out our website for more experiments, written explanations of the steps and the material list. http://www.thesciguys.ca If you enjoyed the video remember to subscribe, comment and like us to show us you care. Remember to like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thesciguys Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thesciguys
Views: 166899 The Sci Guys
זריעת בידוד לתרביות
 
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0:01As part of Module One it is important to understand the process of culturing microbes in the lab. 0:07When culturing microbes, especially bacteria, in the laboratory setting, there are five 0:11steps that are generally used. These steps are referred to as the 5 I's as each step 0:16starts with the letter I. The five steps are Inoculation, Incubation, Isolation, Inspection 0:24and Identification. The first step in cultivating microbes is 0:30to obtain a small sample, known as an inoculum and to introduce it to an new environment 0:36which allows the microbe to grow. In the lab we usually use a medium, such as an agar plate 0:42or a broth tube to grow the microbe. This process is known as inoculation. In the clinical 0:48setting, a specimen such as feces, saliva, blood or other human material, maybe used 0:53to obtain the inoculum. After the medium has been inoculated, we must 1:00allow it time to grow or to incubate. Microbes should be incubated at their optimal conditions. 1:06Such conditions as temperature, Oxygen, etc. need to be considered. 1:13After incubating your microbes the growth you see on the plate or in the broth is known 1:17as the culture. Cultures are classified by the number and type of species present. If 1:23the culture only has one type of microbe from a known origin it is called a pure culture. 1:31If there are two or more microbes that are identifiable then it is referred to as a mixed 1:36culture. However, if a culture contains unknown or unwanted microbes, it is contaminated. 1:47When looking at a culture, many times you need to separate one of the masses or group 1:52of cells, called a colony, from the others. This is especially true if you used a human 1:58specimen to inoculate the media, as it will contain many microbes. To separate a colony 2:05from a group is called isolation, and there are several methods of isolation. 2:12The three methods for isolation are the streak plate, pour-plate and the spread plate. In 2:19all three methods, the purpose is to dilute the sample. 2:26You will perform a streak plate technique in lab. In this procedure an inoculum is spread 2:31across the plate in 3 to 4 sectors, bacteria are obtained from the previous sector and 2:39streaked across the agar, thus diluting the sample. In the Pour Plate method, a serial 2:50dilution method is used by diluting the specimen with each subsequent tubes of broth. The tubes 2:57are then poured into a petri dish and allowed to cool, so the agar will solidify. Colonies 3:04will grow throughout and on top of the media. In the spread plate method, a known amount 3:11of broth containing the specimen is distributed across an agar plate, using a spreader. This 3:18dilutes the specimen across the surface of the plate. 3:25After incubating your inoculum, you must inspect your cultures. When we inspect we do so in 3:32two ways, first we must inspect our cultures macroscopically, in other words using our 3:37eyes. We can learn a great deal of information from a macroscopic inspection, in particular, 3:44viewing the colonies morphology and color, help us determine if the culture is pure. 3:51If not, we may have to perform one of the isolation methods we just reviewed. When a 3:56culture appears macroscopically to contain only the species desired, we then must inspect 4:03microscopically.
Views: 886 Gilad Pelossof
Jody Adams: Fermentation, an Ancient Trend, Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series 2014
 
01:01:35
Enroll in Science & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science from HarvardX at https://www.edx.org/course/science-cooking-haute-cuisine-soft-harvardx-spu27x-0#.VPCXBbPF-YQ Top chefs and Harvard researchers explore how everyday cooking and haute cuisine can illuminate basic principles in physics and engineering, and vice versa. The recording of these lectures was supported by the Harvard MRSEC program of the National Science Foundation under award DMR-1420570 MRSEC (http://www.mrsec.harvard.edu/), SEAS (http://www.seas.harvard.edu/), and HarvardX.
Views: 49398 Harvard University
How to Inoculate a Tryptone Broth Tube for Indole Production - MCCC Microbiology
 
01:33
MCCC BIO201 Microbiology Laboratory Instructional Videos
Views: 6311 MCCC Microbiology
Tetanus symptoms in a goat at early stage
 
02:53
LIKE VIDEO, SUBSCRIBE THE CHANNEL Clinical Findings The incubation period varies from one to several weeks but usually averages 10–14 days. Localized stiffness, often involving the masseter muscles and muscles of the neck, the hindlimbs, and the region of the infected wound, is seen first; general stiffness becomes pronounced ~1 day later, and tonic spasms and hyperesthesia become evident. Because of their high resistance to tetanus toxin, dogs and cats often have a long incubation period and frequently develop localized tetanus; however, generalized tetanus does develop in these species. The reflexes increase in intensity, and the animal is easily excited into more violent, general spasms by sudden movement or noise. Spasms of head muscles cause difficulty in prehension and mastication of food, hence the common name, lockjaw. In horses, the ears are erect, the tail stiff and extended, the anterior nares dilated, and the third eyelid prolapsed. Walking, turning, and backing are difficult. Spasms of the neck and back muscles cause extension of the head and neck, while stiffness of the leg muscles causes the animal to assume a “sawhorse” stance. Sweating is common. General spasms disturb circulation and respiration, which results in increased heart rate, rapid breathing, and congestion of mucous membranes. Sheep, goats, and pigs often fall to the ground and exhibit opisthotonos when startled. Consciousness is not affected. In dogs and cats, localized tetanus often presents as stiffness and rigidity in a limb with a wound. The stiffness progresses to involve the opposing limb and may advance anteriorly. The appearance in generalized tetanus is similar to that described for horses except that the partially open mouth with the lips drawn back (as seen in people) is usually evident. Young, large-breed dogs seem to be most commonly affected. Usually, the temperature remains slightly above normal, but it may rise to 108°–110°F (42°–43°C) toward the end of a fatal attack. In mild attacks, the pulse and temperature remain nearly normal. Mortality averages ~80% (~50% in dogs in one study). In animals that recover, there is a convalescent period of 2–6 wk; protective immunity usually does not develop after recovery. Diagnosis The clinical signs and history of recent trauma are usually adequate for a clinical diagnosis of tetanus. It may be possible to confirm the diagnosis by demonstrating the presence of tetanus toxin in serum from the affected animal. In cases in which the wound is apparent, demonstration of the bacterium in gram-stained smears and by anaerobic culture may be attempted.
Role of the Laboratory in Antimicrobial Stewardship
 
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This presentation discusses the major roles of the clinical laboratory in antimicrobial stewardship and identifies when and how diagnostic tests should be incorporated in antimicrobial stewardship efforts. Dr. Diekema delivered this presentation during the Nebraska Antimicrobial Stewardship Summit held on June 1st, 2018.
Views: 68 Nebraska ASAP
Anammox activity test
 
38:46
A manometric approach is applied in this test to determine the activity of an Anammox culture.
Sri Lanka,ශ්‍රී ලංකා,Ceylon,Baby Sea turtles hatched the night before release
 
00:59
A privatly sponsored turtle hatching place shows visitors the fresh born seaturtles a few hours before their release back into nature.Sea turtles (superfamily Chelonioidea) are marine reptiles that inhabit all of the world's oceans except the Arctic.The superfamily Chelonioidea has a world-wide distribution; sea turtles can be found in all oceans except for the polar regions.Some species travel between oceans. The flatback sea turtle is found solely on the northern coast of Australia.Sea turtles are almost always submerged in water, and, therefore, have developed an anaerobic system of respiration. Although all sea turtles breathe air, under dire circumstances they may divert to anaerobic respiration for long periods of time. When surfacing to breathe, a sea turtle can quickly refill its lungs with a single explosive exhalation and rapid inhalation. Their large lungs have adapted to permit rapid exchange of oxygen and to avoid trapping gases during deep dives. However, sea turtles must emerge while breeding, given the extra level of activity.According to SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment, a lifespan of 80 years is feasible for sea turtles.It takes decades for sea turtles to reach sexual maturity. After mating at sea, adult female sea turtles return to land to nest at night. Different species of sea turtles exhibit various levels of philopatry. In the extreme case, females return to the beach where they hatched. This can take place every two to four years in maturity. They make from one to eight nests per season.The mature nesting female hauls herself onto the beach, nearly always at night, and finds suitable sand on which to create a nest. Using her hind flippers, she digs a circular hole 40 to 50 centimetres (16 to 20 in) deep. After the hole is dug, the female then starts filling the nest with a clutch of soft-shelled eggs one by one until she has deposited around 50 to 200 eggs, depending on the species. Some species have been reported to lay 250 eggs, such as the hawksbill. After laying, she re-fills the nest with sand, re-sculpting and smoothing the surface until it is relatively undetectable visually. The whole process takes thirty to sixty minutes. She then returns to the ocean, leaving the eggs untended.The hatchling's gender depends on the sand temperature. Lighter sands maintain higher temperatures, which decreases incubation time and results in more female hatchlings.Incubation takes about two months. The eggs in one nest hatch together over a very short period of time. When ready, hatchlings tear their shells apart with their snout and dig through the sand. Again, this usually takes place at night, when predators such as seagulls cannot fly. Once they reach the surface, they instinctively head towards the sea. If, as happens on rare occasions, hatching takes place during daylight, only a very small proportion of each hatch (usually 0.01%) succeed, because local opportunist predators, such as the common seagull, gorge on the new sea turtles. Thus there is an obvious evolutionary drive to hatch at night, when survival rates on the beach are much higher.The hatchlings then proceed into the ocean, where a variety of marine predators await them. In 1987, Carr discovered that the young of Chelonia mydas and Caretta caretta spent a great deal of their pelagic lives in floating sargassum beds, where there are thick mats of unanchored seaweed. Within these beds, they found ample shelter and food. In the absence of sargassum beds, sea turtle young feed in the vicinity of upwelling "fronts".In 2007, Reich determined that green sea turtle hatchlings spend the first three to five years of their lives in pelagic waters. In the open ocean, pre-juveniles of this particular species were found to feed on zooplankton and smaller nekton before they are recruited into inshore seagrass meadows as obligate herbivores.Instead of nesting individually like the other species, Ridley sea turtles come ashore en masse, known as an "arribada" (arrival). With the Kemp's ridley sea turtles this occurs during the day.Sea turtles, along with other turtles and tortoises, are part of the order Testudines.The seven living species of sea turtles are: flatback sea turtle, green sea turtle, hawksbill sea turtle, Kemp's ridley sea turtle, leatherback sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle and olive ridley sea turtle.All species except the leatherback are in the family Cheloniidae. The leatherback belongs to the family Dermochelyidae and is its only member.(wikipedia)
Views: 965 NickVenture1
THERMO 3310 INCUBATOR (3177J)
 
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Thermo 3310 SteriCult CO2 Incubator http://www.americaninstrument.com/equipment/product/?code=3177J-INCIncubators •Single 11.4 cubic foot chamber •Temperature range: ambient +5°C to 50°C •HEPA air filter provides Class 100 air quality •Ideal for cell culture •90 day warranty The Thermo 3310 SteriCult CO2 incubator is ideal for cell culture work. The Thermo 3310 SteriCult features integral 140°C high-temperature sterilization function that simplifies cleaning protocols and optimized airflow system that does not interfere with samples or incubator function, as well as in-chamber HEPA air filtration continuously removes particulates for Class 100 quality conditions. The Thermo 3307 allows users to carry out high-volume culturing with strict contamination controls. The on-demand 140°C sterilization cycle eliminates contamination from internal surfaces and an audible alarm activates if outer door is opened during the cycle or if temperature reaches 60°C (140°F) or greater. An access code prevents accidental initiation of the cycle. The in-chamber HEPA air filtration system reduces particulates in the chamber to Class 100 cleanroom levels and preserves the aseptic culturing environment. Even after the chamber door is opened during sample retrieval or addition, the optimized airflow system returns the chamber to Class 100 air quality within five minutes. The external humidification system reduces the risk of waterborne contamination in the chamber and culture area and allows for simple visual water level monitoring, eliminating the need to open the incubator door and thus further reducing the risk of any contamination of the samples. Our technicians test CO2 incubators using a calibrated digital chart recorder to verify the accuracy of temperature controls and readouts, as well as using a Fyrite indicator to measure CO2 levels in the chamber. We replace any hardware or parts as is necessary and clean all incubators thoroughly prior to shipment. Thermo 3310 CO2 Steri-Cult Incubator Specifications Disinfection Time: 14 hours total cycle, 140°C CO2 Concentration Range: 0 to 20% CO2 Sensor Technology: IR Humidity Delivery: External Reservoir Relative Humidity: Ambient to 95%, controlled Temperature Range: 5° to 50°C Weight: 410 lb. CO2 Concentration Control: ±0.1% at 5% Capacity: 11.4 cu.ft. Interior Dimensions (D x W x H): 20.6” x 28.8” x 32.8” CLICK LINK BELOW TO VIEW OUR COMPLETE INVENTORY OF OUR INCUBATORS http://www.americaninstrument.com/refurbished-Incubators.php FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT US AT American Instrument Exchange, Inc. 1023 Western Avenue Haverhill, MA 01832 Phone: 978-521-2221 Fax: 978-521-8822 EMAIL: [email protected] VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR ALL YOUR LABORATORY EQUIPMENT NEEDS http://www.americaninstrument.com/
Beautiful Sea Turtle
 
00:25
A Beautiful sea ​​turtle swims in the Mediterranean Sea! Una bellissima Tartaruga marina nuota nelle acque del mar Mediterraneo! Sea turtles (superfamily Chelonioidea) are marine reptiles that inhabit all of the world's oceans except the Arctic. Sea turtles are almost always submerged, and, therefore, have developed an anaerobic system of respiration. Although all sea turtles breathe air, under dire circumstances they may divert to anaerobic respiration for long periods of time. When surfacing to breathe, a sea turtle can quickly refill its lungs with a single explosive exhalation and rapid inhalation. Their large lungs have adapted to permit rapid exchange of oxygen and to avoid trapping gases during deep dives. However, sea turtles must emerge while breeding, given the extra level of activity. The mature nesting female hauls herself onto the beach, nearly always at night, and finds suitable sand on which to create a nest. Using her hind flippers, she digs a circular hole 40 to 50 centimetres (16 to 20 in) deep. After the hole is dug, the female then starts filling the nest with a clutch of soft-shelled eggs one by one until she has deposited around 50 to 200 eggs, depending on the species. Some species have been reported to lay 250 eggs, such as the hawksbill. After laying, she re-fills the nest with sand, re-sculpting and smoothing the surface until it is relatively undetectable visually. The whole process takes thirty to sixty minutes. She then returns to the ocean, leaving the eggs untended. The hatchling's gender depends on the sand temperature. Lighter sands maintain higher temperatures, which decreases incubation time and results in more female hatchlings. Hawksbill sea turtle from Black Hills, Honduras Incubation takes about two months. The eggs in one nest hatch together over a very short period of time. When ready, hatchlings tear their shells apart with their snout and dig through the sand. Again, this usually takes place at night. Once they reach the surface, they instinctively head towards the sea. If, as happens on rare occasions, hatching takes place during daylight, only a very small proportion of each hatch (usually 0.01%) succeed, because local opportunist predators, such as the common seagull, gorge on the new sea turtles. Thus there is an obvious evolutionary drive to hatch at night, when survival rates on the beach are much higher. The hatchlings then proceed into the ocean, where a variety of marine predators await them. In 1987, Carr discovered that the young of Chelonia mydas and Caretta caretta spent a great deal of their pelagic lives in floating sargassum beds, where there are thick mats of unanchored seaweed. Within these beds, they found ample shelter and food. In the absence of sargassum beds, sea turtle young feed in the vicinity of upwelling "fronts". In 2007, Reich determined that green sea turtle hatchlings spend the first three to five years of their lives in pelagic waters. In the open ocean, pre-juveniles of this particular species were found to feed on zooplankton and smaller nekton before they are recruited into inshore seagrass meadows as obligate herbivores. Instead of nesting individually like the other species, Ridley sea turtles come ashore en masse, known as an "arribada" (arrival). With the Kemp's ridley sea turtles this occurs during the day.!
Views: 7252 metocco
Neisseria
 
01:58
This video is part of the UOIT virtual lab, which is composed of a series of videos to demonstrate lab activities to med lab students.
Views: 1211 teachinglearninguoit
Tutorial on Chatacterization of wastes
 
28:10
This video contains the numerical problem on the Characterization of waste to the course Waste to Energy Conversion.
Culturing Microbes
 
06:20
Views: 15264 Becky Boone
Shelli Kramer - Nitrosomonas Eutropha and the Effects of Modern Hygienic Practices
 
22:03
Modern hygienic practices may affect the ability for the Nitrosomonas to colonize the skin's normal flora and negate it’s potentially benefits to humans. The potential benefits of reintroducing the Nitrosomonas artificially back into the skin's normal flora are explored in this research project. For more information on this and other happenings at the college, visit http://www.jccc.edu.
Views: 268 JCCCvideo
Soil Test - pH and NPK Nitrogen Phosphorus and Potassium
 
04:54
Visit http://www.jandjacres.net for more hobby farm activities. The results were - in a word - terrible. In two words, heart wrenching. In interpreting the results, the chart that came with my soil tester says I need to add the following pounds per 100 square foot of these nutrients: (N) Nitrogen: .64 (P) Potassium: .13 (K) Phosphorus: .28 This translates roughly in to a ratio of: N -5 P - 1 K - 2 I have found an organic fertilizer with the ratio of 7-1-2. Should I apply this organic fertilizer or is there something I can use that is on our property to fix the issue?
Views: 71729 J&J Acres
Sri Lanka,ශ්‍රී ලංකා,Ceylon,Baby Sea turtles at Kosgoda Beach (01)
 
04:22
A privatly sponsored turtle hatching place "Kosgoda Turtle Conservation Project" located beside the town of Kosgoda, shows visitors the fresh born seaturtles a few hours before their release back into nature.Sea turtles (superfamily Chelonioidea) are marine reptiles that inhabit all of the world's oceans except the Arctic.The superfamily Chelonioidea has a world-wide distribution; sea turtles can be found in all oceans except for the polar regions.Some species travel between oceans. The flatback sea turtle is found solely on the northern coast of Australia.Sea turtles are almost always submerged in water, and, therefore, have developed an anaerobic system of respiration. Although all sea turtles breathe air, under dire circumstances they may divert to anaerobic respiration for long periods of time. When surfacing to breathe, a sea turtle can quickly refill its lungs with a single explosive exhalation and rapid inhalation. Their large lungs have adapted to permit rapid exchange of oxygen and to avoid trapping gases during deep dives. However, sea turtles must emerge while breeding, given the extra level of activity.According to SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment, a lifespan of 80 years is feasible for sea turtles.It takes decades for sea turtles to reach sexual maturity. After mating at sea, adult female sea turtles return to land to nest at night. Different species of sea turtles exhibit various levels of philopatry. In the extreme case, females return to the beach where they hatched. This can take place every two to four years in maturity. They make from one to eight nests per season.The mature nesting female hauls herself onto the beach, nearly always at night, and finds suitable sand on which to create a nest. Using her hind flippers, she digs a circular hole 40 to 50 centimetres (16 to 20 in) deep. After the hole is dug, the female then starts filling the nest with a clutch of soft-shelled eggs one by one until she has deposited around 50 to 200 eggs, depending on the species. Some species have been reported to lay 250 eggs, such as the hawksbill. After laying, she re-fills the nest with sand, re-sculpting and smoothing the surface until it is relatively undetectable visually. The whole process takes thirty to sixty minutes. She then returns to the ocean, leaving the eggs untended.The hatchling's gender depends on the sand temperature. Lighter sands maintain higher temperatures, which decreases incubation time and results in more female hatchlings.Incubation takes about two months. The eggs in one nest hatch together over a very short period of time. When ready, hatchlings tear their shells apart with their snout and dig through the sand. Again, this usually takes place at night, when predators such as seagulls cannot fly. Once they reach the surface, they instinctively head towards the sea. If, as happens on rare occasions, hatching takes place during daylight, only a very small proportion of each hatch (usually 0.01%) succeed, because local opportunist predators, such as the common seagull, gorge on the new sea turtles. Thus there is an obvious evolutionary drive to hatch at night, when survival rates on the beach are much higher.The hatchlings then proceed into the ocean, where a variety of marine predators await them. In 1987, Carr discovered that the young of Chelonia mydas and Caretta caretta spent a great deal of their pelagic lives in floating sargassum beds, where there are thick mats of unanchored seaweed. Within these beds, they found ample shelter and food. In the absence of sargassum beds, sea turtle young feed in the vicinity of upwelling "fronts".In 2007, Reich determined that green sea turtle hatchlings spend the first three to five years of their lives in pelagic waters. In the open ocean, pre-juveniles of this particular species were found to feed on zooplankton and smaller nekton before they are recruited into inshore seagrass meadows as obligate herbivores.Instead of nesting individually like the other species, Ridley sea turtles come ashore en masse, known as an "arribada" (arrival). With the Kemp's ridley sea turtles this occurs during the day.Sea turtles, along with other turtles and tortoises, are part of the order Testudines.The seven living species of sea turtles are: flatback sea turtle, green sea turtle, hawksbill sea turtle, Kemp's ridley sea turtle, leatherback sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle and olive ridley sea turtle.All species except the leatherback are in the family Cheloniidae. The leatherback belongs to the family Dermochelyidae and is its only member.(wikipedia)
Views: 2415 NickVenture1
Sri Lanka,ශ්‍රී ලංකා,Ceylon,Baby Sea turtles at Kosgoda Beach (02)
 
04:00
A privatly sponsored turtle hatching place "Kosgoda Turtle Conservation Project" located beside the town of Kosgoda, shows visitors the fresh born seaturtles a few hours before their release back into nature.Sea turtles (superfamily Chelonioidea) are marine reptiles that inhabit all of the world's oceans except the Arctic.The superfamily Chelonioidea has a world-wide distribution; sea turtles can be found in all oceans except for the polar regions.Some species travel between oceans. The flatback sea turtle is found solely on the northern coast of Australia.Sea turtles are almost always submerged in water, and, therefore, have developed an anaerobic system of respiration. Although all sea turtles breathe air, under dire circumstances they may divert to anaerobic respiration for long periods of time. When surfacing to breathe, a sea turtle can quickly refill its lungs with a single explosive exhalation and rapid inhalation. Their large lungs have adapted to permit rapid exchange of oxygen and to avoid trapping gases during deep dives. However, sea turtles must emerge while breeding, given the extra level of activity.According to SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment, a lifespan of 80 years is feasible for sea turtles.It takes decades for sea turtles to reach sexual maturity. After mating at sea, adult female sea turtles return to land to nest at night. Different species of sea turtles exhibit various levels of philopatry. In the extreme case, females return to the beach where they hatched. This can take place every two to four years in maturity. They make from one to eight nests per season.The mature nesting female hauls herself onto the beach, nearly always at night, and finds suitable sand on which to create a nest. Using her hind flippers, she digs a circular hole 40 to 50 centimetres (16 to 20 in) deep. After the hole is dug, the female then starts filling the nest with a clutch of soft-shelled eggs one by one until she has deposited around 50 to 200 eggs, depending on the species. Some species have been reported to lay 250 eggs, such as the hawksbill. After laying, she re-fills the nest with sand, re-sculpting and smoothing the surface until it is relatively undetectable visually. The whole process takes thirty to sixty minutes. She then returns to the ocean, leaving the eggs untended.The hatchling's gender depends on the sand temperature. Lighter sands maintain higher temperatures, which decreases incubation time and results in more female hatchlings.Incubation takes about two months. The eggs in one nest hatch together over a very short period of time. When ready, hatchlings tear their shells apart with their snout and dig through the sand. Again, this usually takes place at night, when predators such as seagulls cannot fly. Once they reach the surface, they instinctively head towards the sea. If, as happens on rare occasions, hatching takes place during daylight, only a very small proportion of each hatch (usually 0.01%) succeed, because local opportunist predators, such as the common seagull, gorge on the new sea turtles. Thus there is an obvious evolutionary drive to hatch at night, when survival rates on the beach are much higher.The hatchlings then proceed into the ocean, where a variety of marine predators await them. In 1987, Carr discovered that the young of Chelonia mydas and Caretta caretta spent a great deal of their pelagic lives in floating sargassum beds, where there are thick mats of unanchored seaweed. Within these beds, they found ample shelter and food. In the absence of sargassum beds, sea turtle young feed in the vicinity of upwelling "fronts".In 2007, Reich determined that green sea turtle hatchlings spend the first three to five years of their lives in pelagic waters. In the open ocean, pre-juveniles of this particular species were found to feed on zooplankton and smaller nekton before they are recruited into inshore seagrass meadows as obligate herbivores.Instead of nesting individually like the other species, Ridley sea turtles come ashore en masse, known as an "arribada" (arrival). With the Kemp's ridley sea turtles this occurs during the day.Sea turtles, along with other turtles and tortoises, are part of the order Testudines.The seven living species of sea turtles are: flatback sea turtle, green sea turtle, hawksbill sea turtle, Kemp's ridley sea turtle, leatherback sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle and olive ridley sea turtle.All species except the leatherback are in the family Cheloniidae. The leatherback belongs to the family Dermochelyidae and is its only member.(wikipedia)
Views: 1324 NickVenture1
The whole of AQA Biology Paper 1 in only 63 minutes!! GCSE 9-1 Science revision
 
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These videos are a revision summary for your 9-1 GCSE science, covering biology, chemistry and physics. To get all the quick-fire questions, Knowledge checklists, key words, equations and units sheets and 190 pages of FREE awesomeness head to my website and download your revision guide https://www.primrosekitten.com/collections Amazon will kindly print it off for you http://amzn.to/2kw8DGb or you can treat yourself to the extended version, http://amzn.to/2g1OdTN with another 100 pages of science questions. These are all available over on TuitionKit http://bit.ly/2yYIxxG where you can schedule your revision videos with a timetable that fits in with your life. AQA Biology Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7O6CcKg0HaGnykp12D8yVee_SEQdaEHH AQA Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7O6CcKg0HaGhn5E_LwNPH69bagsYQaJs AQA Physics Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7O6CcKg0HaFYC_J92AxS1pfepJJK8kxt GCSE Maths in only 2 hours https://youtu.be/dYPwEyeyPLA AQA P1 in only 40 minutes https://youtu.be/xtw-Z0nllA4 The whole of AQA P2 in only47 minutes https://youtu.be/X1aMXCr75Kw I want to help you achieve the grades you (and I) know you are capable of; these grades are the stepping stone to your future. Even if you don't want to study science or maths further, the grades you get now will open doors in the future. TuitionKit allows you to schedule your revision videos, mine and loads of other great YouTubers! http://bit.ly/2yYIxxG To help you get even better grades I’ve written a lot of e-books, packed full of loads of awesome questions to help you study. Because the best thing you can to is practice. Visit my website for e-books, flashcards and extension questions https://www.primrosekitten.com My exam predictions are just GUESSES!! I don't have any insider knowledge just years of looking at exam papers. Use this as a starting point, but revise EVERYTHING fully. The best way to revise is to get your hands on the past papers and marks schemes (freely available on the exam board website) and look at what questions have been asked and how to answer them. I have lots of notes and exam papers on here to help you. Disclaimer; You should not carry out any of these practical’s without carrying out a full risk assessment of your own first. Just watching these video will not guarantee to get you a good grade, you’ll also need hard work, this is not a quick fix. I am human and I make mistakes, please point out any that you find and there is no need to follow that with a load of abuse. Some of the links in here are affiliate links, where is get a small percentage of any money spent, if you like my channel and want to support my work, clicking these is an easy way to do it. The 'whole of topic in xxx minutes' videos DO NOT comprehensively cover everything you need to know for your exams. it would be impossible to cover 2 years of teaching in under 45 minutes. These should NOT be your only source of revision https://youtu.be/K6d4oOq-pmU xoxox PhET Interactive Simulations University of Colorado Boulder https://phet.colorado.edu Music; Something Elated by Broke For Free. From the Free Music Archive, CC BY Images from; Classroom Core (TpT), Hidesy Clipart (TpT), The Cher Room (TpT), The Triple Point (TpT), Ninja Woman (TpT), The Painted Crew (TpT) Shutterstock
Biochemical oxygen demand
 
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Biochemical oxygen demand or B.O.D is the amount of dissolved oxygen needed by aerobic biological organisms in a body of water to break down organic material present in a given water sample at certain temperature over a specific time period. The term also refers to a chemical procedure for determining this amount. This is not a precise quantitative test, although it is widely used as an indication of the organic quality of water. The BOD value is most commonly expressed in milligrams of oxygen consumed per litre of sample during 5 days of incubation at 20 °C and is often used as a robust surrogate of the degree of organic pollution of water. BOD can be used as a gauge of the effectiveness of wastewater treatment plants. It is listed as a conventional pollutant in the U.S. Clean Water Act. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 12408 Audiopedia
Mysterious Microbes - Full Episode
 
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They are some the ocean's tiniest inhabitants. On coral reefs, microorganisms are copious creatures. But in a world that's invisible to the naked eye, drastic changes are taking place. Throughout Florida, scientists painstakingly work to identify key players within this microbial community. Recent breakthroughs revealed a direct link between a human pathogen and a devastating coral disease. With corals under immense stress, experts are using advanced genetic tools and a former aquarium "pest" to better comprehend these microscopic organisms. With experimental sites in the lab and in the sea, what will microbes reveal about coral health? How do human activities impact the microbial balance on the reef?
Views: 619 ChangingSeasTV
Mbraun Glove Box Labmaster 130 3 ports
 
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goo.gl/ZzO6af MBraun Labmaster 130 3 ports For Sale from http://www.HiTechTrader.com http://www.priceondock.com ( Item 006160916 ) MBraun Labmaster Model 130 glove-box, this was manufactured in 2002, the glove box maximum pressure is 20 mbar, the minimum pressure is -20 mbar. This MBraun manufactured glove box has Humidity and O2 sensors. The Antechamber is rated for 10 -4 mbar for total vaccum. The integral leak rate is 10 -5 mbar sec, process gas that can be used are N2 / Ar / He. The temp range is 15 C to 30 C, the blower flow rate maximum is 20 m3 / h. The blower is also a single stage blower. The maximum gas purification is less than 1 ppm H20 / O2. Glove Boxes Glove boxes are designed to handle objects in experiments with a change in pressure or vacuum. The Glove Box provides a researcher with the ability to conduct experiments with varying the temperature vacuum level or pressure level. Inert Gas gas also be introducted to reduce the risk in hazardous material work. Configurations of Gloveboxes Boxes can come with 2 ports or more. Some have a stainless steel inside, while others have a coated plastic interior. HiTechTrader.com buys, has for sale and trades used MBraun, VAC, Vacuum Atmosphere, Terra, Thermo, Labconco and other great top manufacturers of glove boxes and other laboratory equipment. Don't forget to purchase new gloves for your new glove box! It is always important to purchase fresh gloves for your glove box! And a good vacuum pump is also recommended to achieve best results. Hitechtrader.com has been a leader in the sales of used laboratory equipment for over 34 years. HiTechTrader.com is a division of Theta Enterprises Incorporated.Founded in 1982 by Dr. Miguel A. Hnatow, our company provides customers an economical solution to the high cost of new scientific and pilot plant equipment. By selling previously owned / refurbished laboratory and scientific equipment, customers have been able to reduce the overall cost of their capital purchases. Family owned and operated, our company prides itself on selling quality equipment and fast delivery. As a leader in the laboratory equipment industry for over 34 years, HiTechTrader's limited warranty provides customer the comfort of knowing they are purchasing their equipment from a reputable dealer and the convenience of being able to evaluate their equipment for 30 days. Hi Tech Trader services a wide spectrum of industrial markets that include; chemical, biological, pharmaceutical, petrochemical, plastics, semiconductor and electronics. We ship used laboratory equipment worldwide, but can also arrange pick up at our Mount Holly New Jersey Facility. Lower prices are available for pick up through our clearance website: http://www.priceondock.com. The “Price On Dock” term (in summary) refers to an AS-IS / WHERE IS purchase transaction where the buyer is responsible for removing, packaging, and transportation costs. The seller is responsible for delivering the item to the edge of the dock. This replicates an auction setting in which the buyer can control and optimize low cost packaging and transportation cost. Find our facility at: goo.gl/3aWnCg Hitechtrader.com 136 Hulme Street Mount Holly, NJ 08060 Phone: (609) 518-9100 Fax: (732) 879-0389 Website: https://www.hitechtrader.com Find us at: goo.gl/3aWnCg Facebook: goo.gl/Sy4jMa LinkedIn: goo.gl/YEbkED Youtube: goo.gl/tFXDDr Google+: goo.gl/s79jnT Twitter: goo.gl/HYDfm1
Views: 341 HiTechTrader.Com
Bacillus
 
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Bacillus is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped (bacillus), bacteria and a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Bacillus species can be obligate aerobes (oxygen reliant), or facultative anaerobes (having the ability to be aerobic or anaerobic). They will test positive for the enzyme catalase when there has been oxygen used or present. Ubiquitous in nature, Bacillus includes both free-living (non-parasitic) and parasitic pathogenic species. Under stressful environmental conditions, the bacteria can produce oval endospores that are not true spores but which the bacteria can reduce themselves to and remain in a dormant state for very long periods. These characteristics originally defined the genus, but not all such species are closely related, and many have been moved to other genera of Firmicutes. Many species of Bacillus can produce copious amounts of enzymes which are made use of in different industries. Some Bacillus species can form intracellular inclusions of polyhydroxyalkanoates under certain adverse environmental conditions, as in a lack of elements such as phosphorus, nitrogen, or oxygen combined with an excessive supply of carbon sources. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3449 Audiopedia
Characterization of wastes-3
 
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This video contains the third part of the Characterization of waste to the course Waste to Energy Conversion. It includes discussion on the following: • Characterization of waste water
Lecture 18
 
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This lecture describes the microbial ecosystems and the water based diseases.
Sulphate reduction test
 
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The sulfate reduction activity of an activated sludge is estimated by applying a sacrificial bottle test.
Multi-contaminant interactions at aquifer-river interfaces
 
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Presented by Stefan Krause - Professor and Chair or Ecohydrology and Biogeochemistry at the University of Birmingham, UK - at the 2018 Emerging Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment Conference. Hyporheic zones at the interfaces between aquifers and rivers are characterized by the spatially and temporally dynamic mixing of groundwater and surface water resources. The mixing of these diverse water sources creates streambed hotspots where different types of legacy and emerging contaminants meet, potentially react or compete for reaction partners. This demands the development of integrated management strategies for groundwater and surface water resources. This talk investigates the organizational principles of drivers and controls of multiple contaminant interactions in hyporheic zones, including examples of different diffuse and point source legacy pollutants as well as emerging contaminants such as engineered nanoparticles and microplastics. The environmental impacts of multiple pollutants on ecosystem functioning (whole stream metabolism, biofilm primary production) are furthermore analyzed in relation to other stressors, such as increasing water temperatures, flood or drought conditions.
Landfill Methane Emissions and Oxidation
 
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Presented by Dr. Jean Bogner, Research Professor, Dept. of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois - Chicago; and President, Landfill +, Inc.
UIC Campus Insights 2014: John Edel
 
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UIC alumnus John Edel describes The Plant, an initiative to transform a vacant meatpacking plant in Chicago's Back of the Yards neighborhood into a zero-emissions indoor hydroponic farm.
Views: 288 thisisUIC