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The 33 - Official Trailer [HD]
 
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The 33 - in theaters November 13th. http://the33movie.com https://www.facebook.com/the33movie --- From Alcon Entertainment and Phoenix Pictures comes the unforgettable true story of “The 33.” In 2010, the eyes of the world turned to Chile, where 33 miners had been buried alive by the catastrophic explosion and collapse of a 100-year-old gold and copper mine. Over the next 69 days, an international team worked night and day in a desperate attempt to rescue the trapped men as their families and friends, as well as millions of people globally, waited and watched anxiously for any sign of hope. But 200 stories beneath the surface, in the suffocating heat and with tensions rising, provisions—and time—were quickly running out. A story of resilience, personal transformation and triumph of the human spirit, the film takes us to the Earth’s darkest depths, revealing the psyches of the men trapped in the mine, and depicting the courage of both the miners and their families who refused to give up. Based on the gripping true story of survival—and filmed with the cooperation of the miners, their families and their rescuers—“The 33” reveals the never-before-seen actual events that unfolded, above and below ground, which became nothing less than a worldwide phenomenon. The international cast is led by Antonio Banderas, Rodrigo Santoro, Academy Award winner Juliette Binoche (“The English Patient”), James Brolin, and Lou Diamond Phillips, with Bob Gunton and Gabriel Byrne. The main cast also includes Mario Casas, Jacob Vargas, Juan Pablo Raba, Oscar Nuñez, Tenoch Huerta, Marco Treviño, Adriana Barraza, Kate Del Castillo, Cote de Pablo, Elizabeth De Razzo, Naomi Scott, Gustavo Angarita, and Alejandro Goic. Patricia Riggen directed “The 33” from a screenplay by Mikko Alanne, Oscar nominee Craig Borten (“Dallas Buyers Club”) and Michael Thomas, based on the screen story by Jose Rivera and the book Deep Down Dark by Hector Tobar. The film was produced by Oscar nominee Mike Medavoy (“Black Swan”), Robert Katz and Edward McGurn. Carlos Eugenio Lavin, Leopoldo Enriquez, Alan Zhang and José Luis Escolar served as executive producers. The behind-the-scene creative team included cinematographer Checco Varese, production designer Marco Niro, editor Michael Tronick and Oscar-nominated costume designer Paco Delgado (“Les Misérables”). The Academy Award-winning team of Alex Henning and Ben Grossman (“Hugo”) supervised the visual effects. The score was composed by Oscar winner James Horner (“Titanic”). “The 33” was filmed on location in Chile’s harshly remote yet stunningly beautiful Atacama desert just kilometers away from where the event took place, and deep within two mines located in central Colombia. A presentation of Alcon Entertainment and Phoenix Pictures, “The 33” is slated to open on November 13, 2015 and will be distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.
Views: 6357129 Warner Bros. Pictures
Sago Mine Disaster
 
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Thirteen men sat in the best barricade they could build, enduring...hoping. They had used their single hour of oxygen from the only Self Contained Self Rescuer issued to them by the company. Their families waited outside living through one of the most difficult times of their lives, praying to see their loved ones once again. As time wore on, we would learn the ultimate fate of those men, those husbands, those fathers, those grandfathers, brothers, uncles, nephews. One was alive, barely holding on…the others had perished in the thick poisoned air of the mine. The miners of Sago were like so many of us. They took one of the few jobs available to them, jobs that would allow them to live in the places they had long called home, jobs that would pay enough to support their families. If only the company had given them more than one SCSR—if only there had been a law—but we know how much power money holds over the hearts of men. It would be the suffering and tragic loss of life of those 12 brave souls—the pain of constant loss felt by their families—that would finally see to it that every coal miner in the United States would never face the same crisis. Millions of Americans became outraged at the events that played out on their televisions, and the ensuing public outcry would accomplish a feat that has seldom been accomplished in the history of US coal mining—the power of coal industry lobbyists was outweighed by the voice of the public in the halls of government. Laws were passed and now additional SCSRs must be purchased by coal companies, underground safe havens must be built and supply miners with three day of oxygen, food, and water. Each time my crew passed a safe haven and SCSR stash on our way to the section, I would think of those men, I would think of their final hours. I would pay my respects to them in my own way and wish that the corruption of the coalfields had not taken their lives. I hope that other miners do the same and remember the day the miners of Sago perished and the hearts of their families were forever broken. May you all rest in peace. God Bless.
Views: 147451 Nick Mullins
A Miner Miracle: Five Years After the Chilean Rescue (2015)
 
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Five years after the collapse of the San Jose gold and copper mine that trapped 33 miners for 69 days, CNN correspondent Rosa Flores travels to Chile to speak with three of the miners. She also speaks with the drillers who worked around the clock on their improbable and miraculous rescue. The hour-long CNN Special Report, A Miner Miracle: Five Years After the Chilean Rescue airs Tuesday, August 4, at 9pmET/PT on CNN and via CNNgo. Jorge Galleguillos can’t shake the tragedy from his mind. He was one of the 33 men trapped a half-mile beneath the hard rock of Chile’s Atacama Desert. He remembers praying to live while preparing to die. Finally, a small drill broke through to the men, allowing them to send an astounding message: ‘All 33 of us are alive.’ Their 69 days underground and their triumphant rescue stunned the world who watched it live on television. The men became globe-trotting celebrities with multiple movie and book offers; however, five years later, Galleguillos and most of the miners still live very humble and difficult lives. Many of the men battle demons and have trouble keeping steady work. And no one was ever held accountable for the collapse of the San Jose gold and copper mine. During the CNN Special Report, Flores interviews former Chilean President Sebastian Pinera, whose optimism for their rescue rallied a nation and the world. She also speaks with Jeff Hart, the drilling expert who successfully carved a tunnel through the earth and helped save the 33 courageous men.
Views: 172460 ConstantlySporadic
The 33 Chilean miners have now been trapped underground for a full month, and they have to deal with
 
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HEADLINE: Chile mine disaster exposes old family feuds CAPTION: The 33 Chilean miners have now been trapped underground for a full month, and they have to deal with their confinement for weeks, or perhaps months, until they can be rescued. The strain also has shaken the fault lines in their families above. (Sept. 5) Many families of the 33 trapped miners in Northern Chile live in this small mining town, called Copiapo. Like in families the world over, sometimes certain relationships can be difficult. Now those strains are starting to manifest themselves at the mine where the men are trapped, about a 45-minute drive through the Atacama desert. TRACK: While a fire warms their campsite, the icy feeling between Cristina Macias and her mother-in-law is as chilling as the desert nights. Both women are here to support the same man, Claudio Yanez, one of the trapped miners. But the women have never gotten along. And now they are fighting over who should get Yanez's salary and donations that have come from all over Chile. Cristina says she needs the money to support the couple's two daughters. She worries about her mother-in-law trying to get the donations, but says she won't get cheated. To handle such disputes, the local government has been forced to institute several measures. The miners were asked to send up a note designating who could get their $1,600 salary for August. Separate bank accounts have been set up for each miner, which no family member can touch. And social workers help settle disputes about which family members should get donations like food and household cleaners. Pamela Leiva, the head social worker at the camp, says settling disputes has required digging into the lives of the miners before the accident. And those those lives, just like lives the world over, can be complicated. There are brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers on both sides of a miner who don't get along, or who depended on his salary to survive. And of course, some miners have skeletons in their closets, which have been unexpectedly open. A few weeks ago one miner's wife and his lover were both keeping vigil at the camp. When the two realized they were both praying for the same man, they had a very public argument, and the wife tore down a poster with the miner's photo that the mistress had set up. Still, for all the difficulties, this tragedy has also brought families together. When it comes to their loved ones, everybody has the same hope that they will get out alive. Peter Prengaman....The Associated Press......Copiapo, Chile APTN STORY NUMBER: 656699 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1a5d70b202800849cb0dd86266c0a4c3 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 274 AP Archive
'The 33' Captures Drama of Chilean Mining Accident
 
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"The 33" is a dramatized account of the 2010 collapse of the San Jose Mine near Copiapó, Chile, that trapped 33 miners 700 meters underground. The film tries to revisit 69 days of agony for the miners below and their families above. VOA’s Penelope Poulou reports. Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/media/video/the-thirty-three-captures-drama-chilean-mining-accident/3062153.html
Views: 967 VOA News
Chilean miners rescue film draws crowds in Santiago
 
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Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe Hundreds of Chileans gathered outside a theater in Santiago for the preview of “The 33”, a Hollywood film based on the true story of 33 Chilean miners trapped underground for 69 days. Follow AFP English on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AFPnewsenglish Latest news on AFP English Twitter: https://twitter.com/AFP Share your top stories on Google+ http://bit.ly/AFP-Gplus
Views: 246 AFP news agency
70 Days Underground  -
 
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70 Days Underground, Surviving 700 m under the Earth saltanat.org Omar Reygada and Dario Segovia two of the 33 Chilean miners are giving a full coverage of the mine accident
Views: 754 yahya333
After more than two months underground, the 33 miners trapped in a Chilean mine may have trouble adj
 
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HEADLINE: Major adjustment ahead for freed Chilean miners CAPTION: After more than two months underground, the 33 miners trapped in a Chilean mine may have trouble adjusting to life on the outside and the inevitable changes they face. (Oct. 13) Just hours after the rescue of 33 men trapped in a Chilean mine began, signs emerged that adjusting to life at the surface may not be easy. Being stuck underground for two months, and a first-of-a-kind rescue to free them, have converted the miners from men who toil in obscurity into limelight sensations. Some, like Claudio Yanez, appear to be embrace the attention. After being rescued, he arrived to a hospital in nearby Copiapo. Much like a rock star, he waved to onlookers and journalists. However, his mother, who was waiting outside, was already worried about the next chapter in his life. She said she just hoped he wouldn't waste his new fame on what she called "stupid things." Beyond rock star status, for some there will likely be real difficulty adjusting to normal life. That is already the case for 19-year-old Jimmy Sanchez, the youngest of the miners. Hours after being rescued, Dr. Guillermo Swett evaluated Sanchez at the hospital. Swett said Sanchez spoke little, and appeared to be have trouble coming to grips with all that had happened. To be sure, there are also indications that the experience underground fortified some of the miners in ways that go beyond money. Swett, the doctor, also evaluated Mario Sepulveda. He says Sepulveda told him about feeling the presence of the devil during the ordeal. According to the doctor, Sepulveda says he fought with the devil, and won. SIGN OUT, in Copiapo. Of course, these men didn't ask to be trapped in a mine, or sign themselves up for a part in an incredible survival story. Just like everything in life, how they adjust will likely be a mixed bag, with some doing well and others less than well. But no matter what the future holds, their lives have undoubtedly been changed forever. APTN STORY NUMBER: 661333 SHOTLIST CHILE POOL 12 October 2010 1. Video showing capsule carrying first rescuer Manuel Gonzalez reaching miners for the first time, Gonzalez steps out of capsule and hugs miners, UPSOUND: cheers CHILE POOL 12 October 2010 2. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera praying 3. Close of screen showing the first miner to be rescued Florencio Avalos getting into capsule ++NIGHT SHOT++ 4. Cutaway of pulley on surface 5. Screen showing rescue capsule leaving underground chamber CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 6. Travelling shot as capsule moves up tunnel CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wife of Florencio Avalos, Monica Araya, standing with Pinera, First Lady Cecilia Morel and Avalos' 7-year-old son Bairo watching rescue capsule coming out of shaft, UPSOUND clapping 8. Close of capsule arriving at surface 9. Cutaway of son crying 10. Avalos emerging from capsule, UPSOUND cheers 11. Various of Avalos emerging and greeting son and wife 12. Pinera and wife embracing Avalos' wife, UPSOUND cheering CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 13. Set up shot of Pinera with first lady on one side, Chilean Mining Minister Laurecen Golborne on the other 14. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Sebastian Pinera, Chilean president: "Florencio told me of his gratitude, the gratitude not only he felt but also the other men who have been trapped those 69 days felt, the gratitude towards Chile, towards the Chileans, they felt from the first moment they weren't alone." CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 15. Video showing capsule ascending into tunnel with miner Mario Sepulveda Espina inside, other miners watching ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 16. Sepulveda's wife Elvira Valdivia with first lady and Atacama Governor Ximena Matas ++NEW ++NEW You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/382b77712de485c1138364d5e372e5a0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 4905 AP Archive
Camp Hope the morning after the miners 33 are rescued
 
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(14 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Wide of San Jose mine 2. Wide of Camp Hope at mine 3. Zoom out of tent 4. Pull-out from poster with picture of miner to wide of Camp Hope 5. Various of woman sweeping camp area 6. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Nanci Lobo, relative of rescued miner: "I am very happy with a comfortable peace that everything is finished and this (the camp) is no longer important." 7. Wide of tents at Camp Hope 8. Pan right of man cleaning up 9. Man taking down flag of Chilean football team Colo-Colo 10. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Dina Barre, friend of rescued miner: "Yes, of course (we'll miss the camp) but for now we are going home happy that the outcome was good and good for him." 11. Mid of a sign reading (Spanish) 'Welcome' 12. Wide of camp STORYLINE A day after the rescue of 33 miners from an underground cavern in a Chilean mine, the media hoard that descended on the rural region is leaving town and the families of the miners, who have held vigil outside the mine, are looking forward to going home. "I am very happy with a comfortable peace that everything is finished and this (the camp) is no longer important," said Nanci Lobo, a relative of one of the trapped miners. Many of the reporters and television cameras have already left the encampment at the San Jose mine. Signs for the rescued miners still cover the walls and fences of the area, as relatives with an air of calm, pick up their belongings and prepare to leave. As the celebration fades, several key questions await resolution. Officials at the copper and gold mine whose collapse trapped the 33 men for more than two months still have to answer why it was allowed to operate at all. Attention will also focus in coming days on the rescued miners themselves, their emotional scars must be tended - and, eventually, it remains to be seen how many will want to return to the underground profession that nearly killed them. President Sebastian Pinera was unequivocal after Wednesday's rescue that the San Jose mine would never open again. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d4a882217a1410334f460f29665a1c9f Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 220 AP Archive
The tension is building for 33 trapped Chilean miners and their families.  With all eyes on Chile's
 
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HEADLINE: Tense final hours ahead for Chilean miners CAPTION: The tension is building for 33 trapped Chilean miners and their families. With all eyes on Chile's effort to make sure that all of the miners are soon lifted to safety, the miners' physical and mental health is being fastidiously monitored. (Oct. 10) In only a few days, rescuers will try to free 33 men who have been trapped in a Chilean mine for more than two months. As that moment approaches, the mood of families at the surface has shifted from euphoria to anxiousness. The euphoria came Saturday, when a drill was able to blast a hole that will be wide enough to pluck the men out. Now comes the waiting, while engineers and rescuers put the final touches on the operation to start sometime next week. For Fernando Carrizo, who has two nephews among the miners, that means trying not to imagine the worst. He says he turns on the television and hears about things that could go wrong. Trying to avoid such a scenario, engineers are reenforcing parts of the the hole. STANDUP By all accounts, the casing process is going smoothly. Mining Minister Laurence Goldbourne says three of 16 pieces of casing have already been put in place. With every piece, the rescue gets closer. Brandon Fisher, president of the company that owns the drill that broke through to the men, nicely sums up the general feeling about the rescue. FISHER SOT SIGN OUT Peter Prengaman, The Associated Press, San Jose Mine, Chile APTN STORY NUMBER: 660979 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4acfc0714928f933e17dbc328b3aa789 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 49 AP Archive
Pipes that will form a tunnel for rescue capsules for 33 trapped miners in Chile arrived at the mine
 
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HEADLINE: Trapped Chilean miners prepare for escape --------------------------------------- CAPTION: After nearly two months trapped underground, 33 miners begin training Monday for their escape. Pipes that will form a tunnel for rescue capsules arrived at the mine on Sunday. (Sept. 27) --------------------------------------- [Notes:ANCHOR VOICE] NEW HOPE FOR THE FAMILES OF 33 MINERS TRAPPED DEEP UNDERGROUND IN CHILE. PIPES THAT WILL FORM A TUNNEL FOR RESCUE CAPSULES FOR THE MEN ARRIVED AT THE MINE ON SUNDAY. THE MAN-SIZED CAPSULE WILL BE USED TO PULL THE MINERS OUT ONE BY ONE. TEAMS ARE STILL DRILLING THREE RESCUE HOLES IN ORDER TO LOWER THE CAPSULE. THE GOVERNMENT SAYS AT LEAST ONE OF THOSE HOLES SHOULD BE FINISHED BY EARLY NOVEMBER. (nat--family sound in spanish) THE MINERS RELATIVES SAY THAT SEEING THE PIPES AND THE RESCUE CAPSULES GIVES THEM HOPE THAT THEIR LOVED ONES WILL BE SAFELY RESCUED. A MICROPHONE INSIDE THE CAPSULE WILL ALLOW EACH MINER TO STAY IN TOUCH WITH PEOPLE INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE MINE WHILE BEING PULLED UP. IN AN EMERGENCY, THE BOTTOM OF THE CAPSULE CAN BE OPENED WITH LEVERS INSIDE SO THE MINER CAN BE LOWERED BACK DOWN BY CABLE. NW, The Associated Press. APTN STORY NUMBER: 659287 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/63e5d1c7a1a9421a93f2c64a9fbd8bee Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 87 AP Archive
Colleagues aid miners' families, food sent down by tube
 
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(26 Aug 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Various wides of mine site 2. Wide of workers at shaft where rescuers are sending supplies in capsules to miners 3. Various of workers putting supplies in capsule 4. Wide of workers lowering supplies to trapped miners 5. Close of lowering 6. Mid workers 7. Mid of equipment lowering cable 8. Mid of workers gathered around vehicle 9. Wide drill tower 10. Supplies donated by other miners for the families of trapped miners being unloaded from trailer 11. Various of supplies being unloaded 12. Chilean Health Minister Jaime Manalich walking through mine site 13. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Chilean Health Minister: "What they were told exactly, and what President (Sebastian) Pinera said, is that this won't be finished before September 18 and could finish before Christmas. The window is pretty wide - we are talking somewhere around three months. The end of November is the likely date that we need to tell them they will have to wait." 14. Lawyer for one of miners, Remberto Valdez talking with reporters 15. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Remberto Valdez, lawyer representing the miner Raul Bustos: "I can't imagine why, when the mine hasn't met the minimum safety requirements of the Chilean miner code, a specialised service for the Chilean government would allow the mine to operate against the interest of the miners." 16. Wide of miners and families STORYLINE Chile's 33 trapped miners received further supplies of food and water on Wednesday, sent down to them half a mile underground by 6-inch-wide (15-centimetre) shafts. They were getting more nutritious food in the form of cans of a milk-like drink that has been enriched with calories and protein, and tastes like chocolate with vanilla. But it will be days before their digestive systems can handle solid food. Meanwhile, fellow Chilean miners delivered supplies to help support the families of their trapped colleagues. Workers from the "Radomiro Tomic" mine brought diapers, food and other goods to the so-called "Hope Camp," where families of the 33 miners are waiting until their loved ones are rescued. Chilean officials don't want the miners to know exactly how long it may take to rescue them, for fear that they might be discouraged. The miners have a general idea that their rescue will take time, they haven't been given the details, Interior Minister Rodrigo Hinzpeter said on Wednesday. Health Minister Jaime Manalich said the miners had been told that it will take until at least September 18 before the tunnel being drilled to rescue them will be completed. "The window is pretty wide, we are talking somewhere around three months. The end of November is the likely date that we need to tell them they will have to wait," he added. He also said rescuers are implementing a health plan to support the miners' well-being during the months it may take to carve out the tunnel, including exercise and other activities to keep them from gaining weight. The miners have been told they can't be bigger than 35 inches (90 centimetres) around the waist, otherwise they won't be able squeeze through the escape tunnel, the health minister said. The escape tunnel will be about 26 inches (66 centimetres) wide - the diameter of a typical bike tire - and stretch for more than 2,200 feet (688 metres) through solid rock. Rescuers also have to account for the space of the basket that will be used to pull the miners to safety, leaving little margin for error. The miners are believed to have lost significant weight during the 17 days it took for the outside world to re-establish contact. The shafts are currently serving as the miners' "umbilical cords" - one for supplies, another for communications and a third to guarantee their air supply. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/def027b523deb421e67f855c5b41d5c6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 27 AP Archive
Families celebrate miners' return to surface, Camp Hope scenes
 
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(14 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Wide of family and friends of miner Franklin Lobos celebrating and throwing confetti the moment he is brought out as the 27th miner to be rescued, media around them, zoom in 2. Mid of family and friends chanting: (Spanish) "Chile, the miners of Chile" 3. Zoom in to faces of emotional family members 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Patricia Lobos, Niece of Miner Franklin Lobos (27th rescued miner): "It's very emotional; I thank God that he was rescued, we are all very content and happy, there is not much more to say." 5. Wide of relatives of rescued miners preparing to leave "Camp Esperanza (Hope)" 6. Wide of woman arranging the mattress to leave 7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Blanca Rojas Carrizo, Sister of Miner Esteban Rojas Carrizo (18th rescued miner): "We are happy, now we are leaving, we are removing the tent because we are going to the hospital to see my brother." 8. Family of Rojas Carrizo packing things to leave 9. Blanca Rojas Carrizo waving good-bye 10. Wide of empy tents in "Camp Hope" 11. Mid of man placing bags in the back of a truck 12. Relative removing a Chilean flag STORYLINE Relatives and friends of Franklin Lobos, the 27th miner to be rescued, celebrated on Wednesday when the former professional soccer player exited the capsule after 69 days underground. Lobos' niece Patricia said it was "very emotional" to see her uncle emerge from the rescue shaft. Meanwhile, families of rescued miners were leaving the Camp Esperanza (Hope) site to meet the miners at Copaipo hospital. By early evening, 31 of the 33 miners had been pulled to freedom, and officials said they might even be able to bring everyone out by midnight. With remarkable speed - and flawless execution - miner after miner climbed into a cramped cage deep beneath the Chilean earth, was hoisted through 2,000 feet (609 metres) of rock and saw precious sunlight Wednesday after the longest underground entrapment in history. After 69 days underground, including two weeks during which they were feared dead, the men emerged to the cheers of exuberant Chileans and before the eyes of a transfixed globe. The operation picked up speed as the day went on, but each miner was greeted with the same boisterous applause from rescuers. The miners made the smooth ascent inside a capsule called Phoenix - 13 feet (3.9 metres) tall, barely wider than their shoulders and painted in the white, blue and red of the Chilean flag. It had a door that stuck occasionally, and its wheels needed lubricating at least once, but it worked exactly as planned. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6809510223294929edcd9f2bb91235d7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 50 AP Archive
Mass at mine where 33 workers trapped
 
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(29 Aug 2010) Copiapo 1. Exterior of church 2. Various of worshippers at Sunday mass 3. Wide of priests 4. Priest talking about miners ++AUDIO NOT USABLE++ 5. Worshippers at mass San Jose mine 6. Wide of camp site 7. Fire engine passing by pile of rubble 8. Various of relatives listening to Pope Benedict XVI's speech about trapped miners 9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Rossana Gomez, wife of trapped miner: "It was a good thing, excellent, for us, we rely a lot on our faith and it is important that he, who I think is closer to God, is supporting us and sending us such a beautiful message." 10. Various of other relatives listening to Pope's speech 11. Various of Chilean Mining Minister Laurence Golborne with experts sending down capsules to miners 12. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Roberto Bravo, Chilean pianist: "It is a privilege to be here accompanying you. I want to share with you this moment of hope and through the music unite us in a loving feeling." 13. Bravo giving concert for miners' relatives 14. Cutaway of audience 15. Wide of Bravo playing STORYLINE: Relatives of the 33 trapped Chilean miners welcomed the news on Sunday that Pope Benedict XVI was praying for them and their loved ones. The pontiff delivered his message to pilgrims gathered for his traditional Sunday blessing in the courtyard of the papal summer residence in Castel Gandolfo in the Alban hills south of Rome. Benedict assured the 33 men and their families that he was spiritually close to them and was praying for a "happy conclusion" to their ordeal. The families of the trapped miners listened to his message through the Internet. "It was a good thing, excellent, for us, we rely a lot on our faith and it is important that he, who I think is closer to God, is supporting us and sending us such a beautiful message," said one of the miners' wives. A special Sunday mass was also held for the miners in the town of Copiapo near the mine. The men have been trapped in the San Jose mine below the Atacama desert since 5 August. On Sunday, Chile's Mining Minister, Laurence Golborne, reiterated the government's estimate of three to four months to rescue the men, rejecting local reports citing engineers who said it could be done in much less time. The federal and local government have been working together to provide entertainment for the family members camped out at the mine, in efforts to boost their spirits. Each morning, a government worker organises and supervises games for the children in the camp, giving weary parents a few hours of rest. On Sunday afternoon, Chilean piano virtuoso Roberto Bravo gave an impromptu performance to lift spirits. The chief engineer in charge of drilling said on Sunday the miners would have to aid their own escape by clearing thousands of tons of rock that will fall as a rescue hole is drilled. After drilling three small bore holes in recent weeks to create lines of communication with the miners and deliver basic food and medicine, Chile's state-owned Codelco mining company will begin boring a rescue hole on Monday afternoon that will be wide enough to pull the men up through 2,300 feet (700 metres) of earth. The first step will be to drill a "pilot hole" similar in size to the other three. Then much larger machine cutters will slowly grind through that hole, forcing crushed rock to fall down into the mine shaft area near the trapped men. Failure to keep the bottom clear of debris could quickly plug the hole, delaying a rescue that officials say could take four months. In all, the trapped miners will have to clear between three-thousand and four-thousand tons of rock, work that will require crews of about a half-dozen men working in shifts 24 hours a day. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ccf8df359e7d48b6e55942608d9fff12 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 2 AP Archive
Families of the 33 miners trapped in Chile marked on Tuesday the end of the second month since the m
 
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HEADLINE: Chile miners mark 2 months trapped underground --------------------------------------- CAPTION: Families of the 33 miners trapped in Chile marked on Tuesday the end of the second month since the miners became trapped, a day after the country's president said they were "very close" to being rescued. (Oct. 5) ---------------------------------------- [Notes:ANCHOR VOICE] Even though two months have passed since 33 miners became trapped at the San Jose mine in northern Chile, excitement is building for the families who are praying for their rescue. Chile's president said his government is getting closer to pulling the miners to safety -- and he hopes to see the rescue in-person before he makes an overseas trip to Europe in the middle of the month. This family member says it's been two months that we have been waiting for them. She says, we are hopeful that they will be brought out any moment now. When the miners were found alive in early August, the government initially predicted the miners would not be rescued until December. But the drilling has gone well enough to move the date ahead -- and just last week, the government predicted a late October rescue. Meanwhile -- Chile's Interior Minister objected to claims that politics would take priority over rescuing the men safely. Tuesday, he said the decision on when to start the operation has nothing to do with politics. The only criteria are the well being of the miners and their health, he said --- and what the technicians and professionals recommend. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/af19646525fa4a41930512be9725a113 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 71 AP Archive
Jubilant miners emerge from below ground to waiting family
 
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(13 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST CHILE POOL 12 October 2010 1. Video showing capsule carrying first rescuer Manuel Gonzalez reaching miners for the first time, Gonzalez steps out of capsule and hugs miners, UPSOUND: cheers CHILE POOL 12 October 2010 2. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera praying 3. Close of screen showing the first miner to be rescued Florencio Avalos getting into capsule ++NIGHT SHOT++ 4. Cutaway of pulley on surface 5. Screen showing rescue capsule leaving underground chamber CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 6. Travelling shot as capsule moves up tunnel CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 7. Wife of Florencio Avalos, Monica Araya, standing with Pinera, First Lady Cecilia Morel and Avalos' 7-year-old son Bairo watching rescue capsule coming out of shaft, UPSOUND clapping 8. Close of capsule arriving at surface 9. Cutaway of son crying 10. Avalos emerging from capsule, UPSOUND cheers 11. Various of Avalos emerging and greeting son and wife 12. Pinera and wife embracing Avalos' wife, UPSOUND cheering CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 13. Set up shot of Pinera with first lady on one side, Chilean Mining Minister Laurecen Golborne on the other 14. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Sebastian Pinera, Chilean president: "Florencio told me of his gratitude, the gratitude not only he felt but also the other men who have been trapped those 69 days felt, the gratitude towards Chile, towards the Chileans, they felt from the first moment they weren't alone." CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 15. Video showing capsule ascending into tunnel with miner Mario Sepulveda Espina inside, other miners watching ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 16. Sepulveda's wife Elvira Valdivia with first lady and Atacama Governor Ximena Matas 17. Capsule emerging from tunnel 18. Valdivia clapping 19. Close-up of Mario Sepulveda inside capsule 20. Valdivia watching, walking towards capsule 21. Wide of capsule 22. Sepulveda getting out of capsule 23. Sepuleda hugs his wife 24. Close-up of Sepulveda, tilt down as he opens bag 25. Various of Sepuleda taking rocks out of bag 26. Sepuleda handing rocks to Pinera and other rescue officials, embracing Pinera 28. Sepuleda embracing men in crowd, leading cheer: UPSOUND: rescuers "Chi Chi Chi, Le Le Le, long live the Chilean miners" 29. Wide of Sepuleda 30. Valdivia and Pinera watching and smiling CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 ++NIGHT SHOT++ 31. Various of Valdivia celebrating, Pinera watching and smiling CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 ++NIGHT SHOT++ 32. Sepuleda being carried towards triage unit, waving to crowd CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 33. Various of 2nd miner to be released Mario Sepulveda arriving at triage unit, hugging family members CHILE POOL 34. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Mario Sepulveda, second Chilean miner to be released: "I'm very happy for all the lovely things you have done for us, I'm happy, the truth is I'm touched that I'm up here again and I just buried 40 years of my life and I'm going to live a lot more to do a new awakening." CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 35. Various of rescue workers adjusting capsule after rescuing fifth miner CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 36. Video showing capsule carrying ninth Chilean miner to be rescued Mario Gomez beginning journey to surface 37. Wide early morning shot of mine AP TELEVISION 13 October 2010 38. Various of Gomez family and friends with balloons and banner awaiting rescue near to mine head CHILE POOL 13 October 2010 39. Capsule carrying Gomez emerging from underground UPSOUND Cheering, clapping 40. Gomez's wife, Lilianette Ramirez, waiting to be reunited with husband, wiping away tears 41. Various of Gomez coming out of capsule, waving Chilean flag 42. Gomez hugging wife CHILE POOL You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f6da32bf40212e23f48becc79bf81f01 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 193 AP Archive
WRAP All nine trapped miners rescued
 
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POOL Night shots: 1. Mid shot, rescue workers lifting yellow metal cage, bringing first rescued miner to the surface, applause as miner arrives at surface 2. Miner on stretcher 3. Second miner brought to surface 4. Wide shot miner placed onto stretcher 5. Various shots as miners are brought to the surface 6. Wide shot scene 7. Miner carried away on stretcher 5. Helicopter overhead 6. Various shots as miners are brought to surface and taken on stretchers 7. Wide shot, zoom in as miner is brought to surface 8. Various shots as miners are brought to surface and taken on stretchers 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Schweiker, Governor of State of Pennsylvania: "I know we've been working for a long long time, 77 hours. And I just want to say a few things, but first: Nine for Nine. (applause) We committed ourselves to the standard of Nine for Nine, we're going to bring everybody up. And I tell you what - the medical assessment team, the drillers, the assemblers, the people that secured the site: Give yourselves a big hand here. (applause)" 10. Cutaway wide of site 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Schweiker, Governor of State of Pennsylvania: "All the guys and the girls who've been cranking for 77 hours: I said to my kids, I'm never going to meet or never going to see a more engaged, determined, hardworking, successful group of people, teammates, American workers, Pennsylvanians. (applause)" 12. Pull out to wide shot STORYLINE: Rescue workers in the US state of Pennsylvania on Sunday pulled nine miners from a watery, 240-foot-deep (72-meter-deep) shaft where they had been trapped for three days. The rescue was a jubilant reward for an effort that had been fraught with one gut-wrenching setback after another. After three grim days of frantic drilling delayed by broken bits and busted seals, the rescuers broke through to the trapped men at 2216 local time (0315 GMT) on Saturday. The breakthrough allowed workers to drop a telephone line to the miners through a small air pipe. Then the word came from an unidentified, mud-caked rescue worker who shouted up from the pit near where they dropped the communication device: "They're all down there. They're waiting to come up. There's nine of them. We talked to them on the telephone." The first words from the miners were blunt. "What took you so long?" one of the miners asked, according to a rescuer. The Sipesville Fire Hall, where the families had been gathering, erupted in celebration. Families cried and hugged and many were in the street with hands in the air. Randy Fogle, 43, the first miner pulled from the 26-inch (66-centimeter) wide hole, was dropped onto a stretcher to the wild applause of rescuers. After that, miners were brought up in roughly 15-minute intervals. The miners needed little medical attention after the three-day ordeal. All nine men were all taken to hospitals, where they were to remain for 24 hours and where they would be reunited with their families, officials said. The miners became trapped in the flooded Quecreek Mine on Wednesday evening, when they inadvertently broke into an abandoned, water-filled mine that maps showed to be 300 feet (90 meters) away. As much as 60 (M) million gallons (227 (M) million liters) of water rushed into the shaft where they were working, and they were able to warn a second crew, which escaped. Reaching the men was sometimes painfully slow. Drilling a rescue shaft to the men, age 30 to 55, didn't begin until more than 20 hours after the accident, because workers had to wait for a drill rig to arrive from West Virginia. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/dcc87ca4f7cc04a1a07f01d671316265 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 4008 AP Archive
WRAP Drill reaches escape shaft to rescue miners ADDS family, minister reax
 
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(9 Oct 2010) 1. Members of the rescue teams at the mine ringing bell to announce break through 2. Relatives and media climbing hill to get to the closest point to the drilling machines 3. Relatives of the miners clapping 4. Relative of miner running with a Chilean banner 5. Relatives of miner hugging each other 6. Relatives of miners posing for the media with Chilean flags and shouting (Spanish): "Chile, the Chilean miners!" 7. Female relatives of the miners hugging each other and shouting hysterically, UPSOUND: (Spanish) "They will get out." 8. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chile Mining Ministry: "This morning at 8:05 we finally broke in the gallery with the hammer with the right size which is 26 inches wide. " 9. Members of the rescue team shouting (Spanish) "Viva Chile" STORYLINE: A drilling rig has punched through to the underground hole where 33 miners have been trapped for 66 agonising days under the Chilean desert, raising cheers, tears and hopes. Relatives waiting at "Camp Hope" on the surface waved Chilean flags and shouted with joy as word spread of the breakthrough, and one man frantically rang a bell even before a siren sounded to officially confirm that the escape shaft had reached the miners. They are still several days away from rescue: Engineers must first check the shaft and decide whether to reinforce it before pulling them to the surface. The "Plan B" drill won a three-way race against two other drills to carve a hole wide enough for an escape capsule to pull the miners out one by one. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/caa170695fbba3f59b06011a690930fb Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 61 AP Archive
Miner tells how he narrowly escaped being trapped with 33 others
 
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(11 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST Copiapo - 11 October 2010 1. Wide of rundown area where Jhonny Quispe lives with his family 2. Quispe entering his house 3. Quispe walking towards camera holding paper with the story about him 4. Quispe reading paper 5. Close-up of article on his story 6. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Jhonny Quispe, miner: "I am still scared, I could have been a victim of that collapse (the one that trapped the 33 miners) The entrance to that area was forbidden. They wouldn't even have found my body. I don't want to find myself in that kind of situation again, I regret having put myself in that kind of situation inside the mine." 7. Cutaway of Quispe standing during interview 8. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Jhonny Quispe, miner: "The owners were putting us at risk. They only cared about making money. They are people who have not shown any humanity." San Jose Mine, Copiapo - 10 October 2010 9. Various of pictures of Carlos Mamani son in law trapped miner Carlos Mamani at "Camp Hope" Copiapo - 11 October 2010 10. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Jhonny Quispe, miner: "He is in good spirits. He sends us letters on a daily basis and he says that he is allright. He is also in good health, thank God." Copiapo - 11 October 2010 12. Various exteriors of Copiapo hospital STORYLINE A Chilean miner who narrowly escaped the 5 of August collapse which trapped 33 of his colleagues inside a mine in Chile has blamed the owners of the pit for putting their employees at risk. "They only cared about making money. They are people who have not shown any humanity," Jhonny Quispe told AP Television. Thirty-nine-year-old Quispe got out of the mine in Copiapo, Chile, minutes before the rock fall stranded the miners more than 600 metres (1,968 feet) underground. He was driving a truck with water outside the mine when he heard a noise and then saw dust coming from the tunnel. His son-in-law, Carlos Mamani, wasn't as lucky. He is among those who in Chile are now called the "33 heroes", but according to Quispe he is in good health and spirits. Quispe and his wife Sabina live in a rundown area on the outskirts of Copiapo and their daughter Verki Veronica lives a couple of doors away with Carlos Mamani and their one-year-old baby. "He sends us letters on a daily basis and he says that he is alright," Quispe said. Quispe added he was too afraid to work in a mine again. He moved from his native Oruro in Bolivia to Arica when he was 12, and arrived in Copiapo in 2005. He had only been employed at San Jose mine for three mines before the accident. The miners are expected to be lifted from the mine early on Wednesday if all goes well with the rescue operation. On Monday, workers successfully tested the rescue capsule along the escape route raising hopes for the miners and their relatives. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/fbf83282a885d672d6cf3c0e0ec05528 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 65 AP Archive
Arrivals for mass in celebration of rescued miners
 
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(17 Oct 2010) 1. Wide of entrance to tent where mass will be held 2. Various of miner Juan Aguilar talking with his family and police officers 3. Red van arriving with Bolivian miner Carlos Mamani and his family 4. Zoom in to Mamani helping his young child and wife out of van, waving to media 5. Wide of media outside entrance to mass tent 6. Wide of Aguilar family talking with Mamani family 7. Aguilar and Mamani talking to each other, with relatives 8. Wide pan right of Mamani family STORYLINE: Miners Juan Aguilar and Carlos Mamani were the first to arrive on Sunday for a morning mass at Chile's San Jose mine in the Atacama desert where they were trapped underground for more than two months. The two men were accompanied by their families and spent some time talking outside the tent where the mass is to be held. Carlos Mamani is the only Bolivian in the group. Medical officials have said that most of the 33 miners are doing well after their ordeal, but need to take steps to reach some form of closure after the trauma of being trapped for so long. The government has promised to track the miners' mental and physical health for at least the next six months. Sunday morning's mass above the site of their entombment is the first major step of many more to come on their path to recovery. Most of the miners headed home over the weekend from the hospital where they were taken after being pulled through a narrow, 2,040-foot (622-metre) deep shaft to the surface on Wednesday in a stunning rescue broadcast live around the world. They are getting substantial offers of money for their story, but made a pact to say little about their 69-day ordeal while negotiating movie and book rights. Chile's government has promised to look out for the rescued miners, and each has received about 12-thousand US dollars in donations, but their futures remain uncertain. The San Jose mine where the men worked is inoperable following the cave-in. At month's end, a judicial arbiter will decide on its bankruptcy. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera has already said it must remain closed as a safety hazard, with 700,000 tons of fallen rock in danger of collapsing still further into the bottom of the mine. Some of the men have new opportunities outside mining. Franklin Lobos, a former professional soccer player who drove trucks at the San Jose mine, is wanted by the world soccer body FIFA to give motivational talks, Chilean soccer director Harold Mayne-Nicholls said. And Bolivian President Evo Morales has offered Mamani a job in his government. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/182f804a8e8234088077fc597edb4527 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 17 AP Archive
Ordeal for 33 trapped miners continues as rescuers progress
 
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(5 Oct 2010) 1. Wide of mine site, AUDIO: bells ringing 2. Wide of police car at mine site, AUDIO: bells and sirens ringing 3. Wide of boy in blue T-Shirt ringing a bell at mine site, AUDIO: bells ringing 4. Mid of family members of trapped miners chanting 5. Various of family members of trapped miners 6. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Griselda Godoy, family member of a trapped miner: "Excited, because it's been two months that we have been waiting for them (the miners). We are hopeful that they will be brought out any moment now." 7. Mid of banner with photos of 33 miners, reading (Spanish) "Strength to the 33 miners!" 8. Close of photos of 33 trapped miners on banner 9. Various of press conference 10. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Cristian Barra, Interior Minister of Chile: "The decision on when to start the operation has nothing to do with politics. The only criteria are the well-being of the miners and their health; and the technical needs, as far as the Keissing (referring to one of the machines they are using in the rescue) is concerned, and the timing, are what the technicians and the professionals recommend." 11. Various of drilling site 12. Wide of mine site 13. Wide of camp site for families of trapped miners 14. Mid of family member of a trapped miner 15. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Mar�a Segovia, family member of a trapped miner: "I feel fine and at least happy that we are on the point of rescuing them. We are happy and have faith as never before." 16. Wide of family members of miners 17. Mid of family members writing letters to trapped miners 18. Close of letter 19. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Lili Gomes, family member of a trapped miner: "I hope everything goes well and that it (the rescue of miners) happens soon." 20. Mid of family members of trapped miners 21. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Doris Contreras, family member of a trapped miner: "Now we are happy, because there is the machine that will rescue them. We hope that it will be successful, that there will be no accidents, that nothing goes wrong with the machines, and we are hoping and praying for a successful rescue." 22. Wide of Chilean flags at camp site STORYLINE: Families of the 33 miners trapped in Chile marked on Tuesday the end of the second month since the miners became trapped, a day after the country's president said they were "very close" to being rescued. Sebastian Pinera said that his government was getting closer to pulling the miners trapped in the San Jose mine to safety and hoped to be there in person to see the rescue before leaving on a trip to Europe. The announcement has given the families renewed hope that their ordeal, which started on the 5th of August when they went missing, will soon be over. "I hope everything goes well and that it (the rescue of miners) happens soon," said Lili Gomes, a family member of a trapped miner. Another family member of a trapped miner said they were waiting and praying for the rescue of the trapped miners, hoping that there will be no accident and nothing goes wrong with the machines. If the miners are released this month it will come considerably earlier than the initial predictions by Pinera, who said when they would be saved before Christmas when the miners were first found alive on 22 August. Meanwhile, Interior Minister of Chile Christian Barra objected to claims that politics would get in front of rescuing the men safely. "The decision on when to start the operation has nothing to do with politics. The only criteria are the well-being of the miners and their health; and the technical needs," added Barra. The Chilean government has assembled a team of hundreds to support them while three simultaneous drilling operations pound escape shafts through a half-mile of rock. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/be8ac2ab555b60fb5a0b8ea8c47bfc58 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 23 AP Archive
First light at mine, miners' relatives at 'Camp Hope'
 
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(10 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Various of mine site with cranes and drilling rigs 2. Mid of entrance to mine 3. Flags, 33 - one for each trapped miner, shrouded in fog 4. Wide of tribute to miners 5. Close of sign with photo of one miner, reading (Spanish) "Richard Villaroel G. We are waiting for you." 6. Relatives of miners at tribute 7. Close of coals being fanned to ignite fire 8. Mid of relative fanning fire 9. Close of photo of miner 10. Wide of mine and camp 11. Mid of tents 12. Pull out of camp 13. Wide of mine site STORYLINE After more than two months trapped deep in a Chilean mine, 33 miners are enjoying Sunday tantalisingly close to rescue. Drillers have completed an escape shaft, and Chile's mining minister says a video inspection shows the hole's walls are firm enough to allow the men to be hoisted out as early as Wednesday. Officials said late on Saturday that workers first must reinforce the top few hundred feet (almost 100 meters) of the tunnel and had begun welding steel pipes for that purpose. The completion of the 28-inch (71-centimetre)-diameter escape shaft on Saturday morning caused bedlam in the tent city known as "Camp Hope," where the miners' relatives had held vigil for an agonising 66 days since a cave-in sealed off the gold and copper mine on 5 August. Miners videotaped the piston-powered hammer drill's breakthrough at 2,041 feet (622 meters) underground and could be seen cheering and embracing, the drillers said. On the surface, the rescuers chanted, danced and sprayed champagne so excitedly that some of their hardhats tumbled off. Later, a video inspection of the shaft gave rescuers enough confidence in the tunnel's stability that they decided they will encase only its first 315 feet (96 meters). The plan is to insert 16 sections of half-inch (1.27 centimetre)-thick steel pipe into the top of the hole, which curves like a waterfall at first before becoming nearly vertical for most of its descent into the chamber deep in the mine. That work would begin immediately, Mining Minister Laurence Golborne said. Then an escape capsule built by Chilean naval engineers, its spring-loaded wheels pressing against the hole's walls, can be lowered into it via a winch and the trapped miners brought up one by one. Golborne and other government officials had insisted that determining whether to encase the whole shaft, only part of it, or none of it, would be a technical decision, based on the evidence and the expertise of a team of eight geologists and mining engineers. Encasing the full shaft would have added another week or so before the rescue could begin - if it could actually be done. The political consequences were inescapable. Chile's success story would evaporate if a miner should get stuck on the way up for reasons that might have been avoided. Some miners' families wanted the entire shaft lined with pipe, but some engineers involved said the risk of the capsule getting jammed in the un-reinforced hole was less than the risk of the pipes getting jammed and ruining their hard-won exit route. Many experts doubted whether encasing the entire shaft was even possible. Health Minister Jaime Manalich said the miners' anxiety is growing about starting their rescue, an operation that should take about a day-and-a-half to complete as they are pulled out one by one in a specially built capsule. Manalich also confirmed that a list has been drawn up suggesting the order in which the 33 miners should be rescued. The final order will be determined by a Navy special forces paramedic who will be lowered into the mine to prepare the men for their journey. The completion of the escape shaft thrilled Chileans, who have come to see the rescue drama as a test of the nation's character and pride. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/fcfe184dd66f40444b6d4d5d69adb3e3 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 40 AP Archive
See Antonio Banderas in the Trailer for Chilean Mining Movie 'The 33'
 
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On August 5, 2010, the San José copper-gold mine in Copiapó, Chile caved in, trapping 33 miners underground.The story made international headlines as Chilean authorities scrambled to devise a plan to rescue the men.For 69 days, the men survived underground, awaiting rescue, until finally, on October 13, all 33 were brought to safety.That story heads to the big screen this fall in The 33, starring Antonio Banderas as Mario Sepúlveda, a miner who hosted many of the videos the group sent to the surface during their time underground.The trailer captures the heightened drama of the ordeal for not only the miners—one an expectant father and another just weeks away from retirement—but also their distressed families, waiting above ground for good news.
Views: 198 Daily Gist
The first three rescued Chilean miners out of the hospital celebrated their new lives as national he
 
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HEADLINE: Details of Chile miners ordeal closely guarded CAPTION: The first three rescued Chilean miners out of the hospital celebrated their new lives as national heroes Friday, as word emerged that the 33 want to closely guard their story. (Oct. 15) The first of the rescued miners down in Chile are going home. Three of the 33 men who were pulled out from deep underground earlier this week were released from a hospital Friday. (NAT SOUND SPANISH) The director of the hospital says all of the men are progressing well and adds he expects even more to be released in the coming days. (NAT SOUND SPANISH) This brother of one of the miners says his brother looks as good today as he did before the incident started back in August. (NAT SOUND OF CHEERING) As expected the men who were released were mobbed by friends and family as well as the media. However, all of the miners have apparently agreed to closely guard their story so they can divide all of the money they may garner from it. And so far none of them have spilled many details about their 69 days under ground. That being said, we have learned a little more about life underground. Family members say the rationing of food was even more severe than what's been told and that the water they had down there tasted of oil. It's not clear though when the rest of the story will emerge. APTN STORY NUMBER: 661621 1. Wide of rescued miner Edison Pena walking out of his home with brother Rafael, both wearing yellow jackets, with father Fernando in front 2. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Edison Pena, rescued miner: "Every moment was difficult, when we were trapped I thought we were going to die. Do you know what that is like?" 3. Close of Pena's face 4. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Edison Pena, rescued miner: "This has to happen. It could have been avoided. Why do these things have to happen? Because the employer, to make money, and what happens? The worker, what happens with the workers? No, just go on in, but no the mountain is making noises, but no, go on in, go on in. That's what!" I do not want to be polemical, but I am really angry. That's why I came down to talk. That's why I came down." 5. Mid of brother Rafael and father Fernando watching the interview 6. Close of Chilean flag with writing on it: "Welcome neighbour Edison Pena" 7. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Edison Pena, rescued miner: "You think I was waiting for the drill to break through? No, my friend, I was running, I was running! And that's why I am so skinny, I am normally much heavier." 8. Neighbour with arm around Pena 9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Edison Pena, rescued miner: "These things have to happen as a lesson, I think in the telethon, I really want to go to it and give my message of life, because this, I assure you was very difficult. No, no, it was very difficult." 10. Pena waving goodbye as he walks back up to his home 11. Wide of hospital officials standing on a podium during a news conference 12. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Health Minister: "We just finished a very emotional meeting. Dr Dias could not stop crying and in this very emotional meeting we realised what the significance of all of this is. We discussed the possibility of the miners returning to the mine and giving thanks -- to express it somehow." 13. Wide of media 14. Mid of hospital officials standing on podium 15. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Health Minister: "We've always been considering the psychological issues they are going to face in the weeks to come, they are very difficult ones. Many of them will have problems and will need help and your hands are reaching out to them. When things start to slow down, that's when we think the anguish and other more complex feelings are going to surface." 16. Close of cameras You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d3289f69bae6312d98997da78e66794d Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 131 AP Archive
Latest from mine where 33 miners are trapped
 
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(23 Aug 2010) 1. Various of trucks carrying drilling devices to San Jose gold and copper mine outside Copiapo in north-central Chile 2. Trapped miners' relatives and friends waving Chilean flags 3. Person showing newspaper front page with headline reading (Spanish) "They are alive." 4. Man reading newspaper at mine site 5. Miners' relatives reading newspapers 6. Truck with Chilean flag on top carrying drilling supplies 7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "Today we are waiting for the first equipment to arrive, one truck arrived now, four more will arrive later on so that we can finish mounting the equipment once we have determined the exact place to place the machinery and its digging direction." 8. Truck arriving at mine site 9. Miners' relatives applauding 10. Wide of equipment on truck arriving at mine site as miners' relatives and friends applaud 11. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Andres Sougarret, mine manager: "We managed to secure what we are calling the 'umbilical cord' so now we can start with the supply of food and communication with the trapped miners." 12. Wide of mine site with Chilean flags 13. Policemen playing football with children of miners' relatives 14. Car with writing on dusty back window reading (in Spanish): "Thanks God the 33 are alive" 15. Tent at "Camp Hope" with banner reading (in Spanish): "God is great" 16. Various of clown cheering up children of relatives of trapped miners STORYLINE: The first equipment needed to set up the machinery to get to 33 trapped miners in the San Jose gold and copper mine outside Copiapo in north-central Chile, arrived on Monday, the 17th day of their ordeal. Engineers reinforced a lifeline on Monday to the miners preparing to keep them supplied with food, water, medicine and communications during the four months it may take to carve a tunnel wide enough to pull them out. A team of doctors and psychiatric experts also arrived on Monday at the remote mine, implementing a plan to maintain the miners' sanity as well. Engineers worked through the night to reinforce the six-inch (15 cm) wide bore-hole that broke through to the miners' refuge on Sunday, more than 2,257 feet (688 meters) below the surface. Using a long hose, they coated the walls with a metallic gel to decrease the risk of more rock falls in the unstable mine and make it easier to pass material in capsules nicknamed "palomas," or doves. The first capsules - which take about an hour to descend from the surface - will include water and food in the form of a high-energy glucose gel to miners who have almost certainly lost significant weight since they were trapped with limited food supplies on August 5. Also being sent down are questionnaires to determine each miners' condition, along with medicines and small microphones to enable them to speak with their families during their long wait. Authorities said the communications equipment could begin working within hours, and that officials were organising the families into small groups to make their talks as orderly as possible. An enormous machine with diamond-tipped drills capable of carving a person-sized tunnel through solid rock at a velocity of 20 metres a day was on its way on Monday to the San Jose gold and copper mine. Engineers also were boring two more narrow shafts to the trapped men to ensure that their lifelines would remain intact while the larger tunnel is being carved. Euphoria that their men survived the collapse and anxiety for what's coming next meant for a sleepless night for the miners' families, who shivered through a cold, foggy night in Chile's Atacama desert. The men already have been trapped underground longer than all but a few miners rescued in recent history. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/04273e42ee1220f52d082b8baf15dc26 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 117 AP Archive
Latest on attempts to rescue 33 men  trapped in a mine for more than a month
 
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(22 Sep 2010) 1. Tents at Camp Hope (families encampment) 2. People in tents 3. Wide of Camp Hope 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Andre Sougarret, chief rescue operation engineer: "One of the four hammers on this drill got dislodged from its base. This is most likely due to a lithological change, since it changed from a harder surface to a softer one." 5. Medium of T-130 Plan "B" drill 6. Medium of Rigs 421 Plan "C" drill 7. Wide of Strata 950 Plan "A" drill 8. Wide of area 9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Andre Sougarret, chief rescue operation engineer: "Today marks the first month of work here (referring to rescue mission.) We have taken a series of additional measures, which have allowed us to change the original release date. The original date was estimated at three to four months, some time between November 22 to December 22. We believe that we will have the miners out within the first days of November." 10. Wide of people decorating for party 11. Close up of clown putting up balloons 12. Wide of Chilean flags STORYLINE: As rescue efforts to release 33 trapped miners in Chile's San Jose mine continue, search and rescue workers told reporters one of the hammers on a drill being used in the mission became detached early on Wednesday. According to the rescue mission's chief engineer Andre Sougarret, one of the T-130 drill's four hammers came loose at around 6:00 am local time (1000 GMT). He blamed a change in ground conditions, as the drill, referred to as the 'Plan B' drill, moved through harder rock into softer strata. But he reassured journalists in Copiapo that rescue workers are still looking at early November as the likely release date, which is six weeks earlier than the initial estimates. The biggest drill, a Strata 950 called "Plan C", 150-foot-tall (45-metre) high, is capable of much faster speed, and the deeper it gets, the faster engineers plan to drill. It can break through 60 to 90 feet (20 to 30 metres) of rock a day toward a point nearly 2,000 feet (600 metres) below the surface, not far from the area where the men have been trapped. And while the other machines must first bore narrower holes and gradually expand their diameter, the Rig 24 can carve a 28-inch-wide (71 centimetre) shaft, just wide enough to pull a man through, in a single pass. Barring unforeseen complications, it could break through to the miners at a point nearly 2,000 feet (597 metres) underground in the second week of October. Sougarret has said it would then take eight days to insert a steel sleeve in the 28-inch-wide hole to prevent rock falling while miners are being pulled out. In another indication of the rescue effort's progress, Sougarret said the rescue capsule, named Phoenix after the mythical bird that rises from the ashes of its own funeral pyre, must be ready within 10 to 12 days after they decide on a final design this week. With that in mind, engineers were viewing prototypes of the capsules on Tuesday at a Chilean navy shipbuilding operation in Talcahuano, where three of the capsules will be built to provide backups in case anything goes wrong. The specifications are elaborate. Each capsule will be equipped with tanks to provide three hours of oxygen, wheels mounted on shock absorbers to maintain contact with the pipe's walls, an internal harness to prevent injury to the miners and a wireless communication system so the men can remain in touch with people inside and outside the mine during the 15- to 20-minute journey to the surface. It also must fit through a tube just 23 inches (58.4 centimetres) in diameter, while also providing just enough room to squeeze inside for the largest man trapped below, a miner whose shoulders measure 19 inches (48 centimetres) across. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6c5eedd584ba3516031bba1fe879a2de Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 1947 AP Archive
Preparations ahead of the rescue of the 33 trapped miners
 
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(8 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Mid of officials walking into portable room (which has been nicknamed "the reuniting room") where the miners will be reunited with their families 2. Wide of room and officials walking around 3. Wide of empty room with blinds on window down 4. Close of windows with blinds down 5. Zoom in on windows 6. Chilean Mining Minister Laurence Golborne and other officials walking around the room 7. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Chilean Health Minister: ++SOUNDBITE STARTS ON MID OF MANALICH THEN ZOOMS IN++ "We set aside this place that we are calling "the reuniting room" for those miners that are in good enough health to stand and walk, and are also calm enough to meet their families and loved ones. Then they will be transported to the helicopters that will be made available to us by the Chilean Air Force and they are not going to be far from here. From there, they will be flown to the hospital in Copiapo." 8. Wide exterior of portable room 9. Mid exterior of room with two men standing at the door 10. Tracking shot along the outside walls of the room 11. Wide of officials around the room 12. Driving wide of the mine STORYLINE: Chilean officials were inspecting the room on Friday where trapped 33 miners will be taken after they are rescued from the depth of the earth after being trapped for more than two months. After they are reunited with their families in what officials have called "the reuniting room", the miners will be taken by the Chilean Air Force helicopter to a hospital in Copiapo. The actual rescue is expected to take 48 hours as the miners are pulled out one by one, a spectacle that has drawn nearly 800 journalists to the isolated San Jose mine in the Chilean desert. Jaime Manalich, the Chilean Health Minister, gave the media a tour of the "reuniting room" which the miners will use before being transported to the hospital in Copiapo by helicopters provided by the Chilean Air Force. "We set aside this place that we are calling "the reuniting room" for those miners that are in good enough health to stand and walk, and are also calm enough to meet their families and loved ones," he added. Meanwhile engineers were carving through the last 128 feet (39 meters) of rock, taking care to keep the T130 drill from jamming or punching through with too much force, Mining Minister Laurence Golborne said. The "Plan B" drill was poised to win a three-way race to reach the miners with a hole wide enough to accommodate their escape capsule. Two other drills, "Plan A" and "Plan C," had to slow down after repeatedly veering off course. The breakthrough - to be heralded with a loud siren - was sure to be an emotional milestone in the tent city known as "Camp Hope." Expectations soared as word came that Chile's first lady, Cecilia Morel, would meet with the families. If the shaft's rock walls are found to be strong, the miners could be pulled out beginning on Tuesday. If not, rescuers will line the shaft at least partially with steel pipe, delaying the rescue for three to eight more days. Many of the miners' relatives do not want the rescuers to take any chances, and wait a few more days if necessary to pull them all out safely. The T130 drill aimed at a workshop 2,047 feet (624 meters) below ground. That's not as deep as where the miners were when 700-thousand tonnes of rock collapsed August 5th. They were found alive seventeen days after the accident, on the August 22nd. The mine runs like a corkscrew for more than four miles (seven kilometres) below a rocky hill in Chile's vast northern Atacama desert, and at any other time, some would probably have been crushed in the middle section. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/129c293624b4b67cdf3126d01f06fffc Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Chilean Miners' Story: Star-Studded Cast Honors 'The 33'
 
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More than a billion people watched when news broke that 33 Chilean miners were buried alive. Now their story is being brought to the big screen in a movie simply titled, "The 33." CBN's Efrem Graham takes us behind the ...
Views: 1088 CBN News
Latest as 33 men become longest-trapped miners in recent history
 
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(13 Sep 2010) 1. Wide of fair organised for currently unemployed San Jose mine workers 2. Mid of miners meeting with representatives of other mining companies 3. Close of a miner talking with a mining company representative 4. Pan of Ministry of Labour Camila Merino arriving 5. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Camila Merino, Chilean Ministry of Labour: "They haven't got their settlement from the mining company and that is something we are trying to sort out but we see that company has some serious problems, the mine is going to be closed for a long time so it is important to start seeing other things, that they start looking for new jobs. The issue of the their contractual situation should be solved soon." 6. Miners meeting with various possible employers 7. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Carlos Avalos, San Jose mine worker: "Through this fair, we are hoping to have the possibility to be hired by other (mining) companies." 8. Wide of entrance to the mine 9. Wide of site where the Plan A, drilling machine Strata 950 is working 10. Mid of T-130 drilling machine, Plan B, that is not working due to technical problems 11. Various of site where they are assembling Plan C 12. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Rene Aguilar, rescue team coordinator: "And I'd like to repeat once more - as I have said many times during the past weeks - that the mine rescue alternative is not viable. There is an enormous block of 700-thousand tons - which is very unstable - so any tentative of entering the mine (through the main entrance) implies a danger for the lives of the people who want to carry out that operation. And what's most worrying is what this information could mean for the miners down there." 13. Mid of pieces of machinery for Plan C arriving in trucks to the mine 14. People with flags cheering and waving while trucks passing by 15. Mid of the same 16. People holding banner between them and waving with flags as trucks passing by STORYLINE: The Chilean Labour Ministry organised job fair on Monday to help the workers at the San Jose mine find new employment as workers fear the mine is unlikely to reopen. Besides the 33 men trapped underground, another 317 people worked - directly or indirectly - at the San Jose mine. Around 15 mining companies answered the authorities' call and have offered jobs to at least 300 people, according to the Labour ministry. Camila Merino, the head of the ministry, also said they were trying to solve the current contractual situation of all the workers - still employed by San Esteban Primera mining company. "They haven't got their settlement form the mining company and that is something we are trying to sort out but we see that company has some serious problems", she said. The company has said it can't afford to pay their salaries and may go bankrupt and is in such bad shape that it has neither the equipment nor the money to rescue the 33 men. It is Chile's state-owned mining company, CODELCO, is in charge of digging the escape tunnel, which will cost about 1.7 (m) million US Dollars. On Monday only one of three drilling efforts was operational - the so-called Plan A drill, reaching down to 750 feet (230 meters). But it too must stop at 820 feet (250 meters), for maintenance work. Plan B, a higher-velocity drill that will carve out a narrower escape tunnel, has been silenced since last week, when it struck an iron support beam for the mine and its drill bit shattered into small pieces. A third drill, Plan C, is still days away from starting its work. Rescuers have already tried three times to use magnets to remove pieces of the shattered second drill and iron beam from the hole. With frustration growing, so is pressure for alternative solutions. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ed15dfcdf4bbdd78df33f9ed2b314749 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 262 AP Archive
Chilean Miners Rescue
 
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Views: 17 domhnallog
WRAP First light at mine, miners' relatives at 'Camp Hope'; ADDS Health, mining Ministers
 
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(10 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST Copiapo 1. Wide of mine site with cranes and drilling rigs Copiapo 2. Wide of work at escape shaft site in fog 3. Mid of crane lowering lining into shaft 4. Wide of site Copiapo 5. Flags, 33 - one for each trapped miner, shrouded in fog 6. Wide of tribute to miners 7. Close of sign with photo of one miner, reading (Spanish) "Richard Villaroel G. We are waiting for you." Copiapo 8. Evangelical preacher giving sermon for trapped miners families and friends under tent Copiapo 9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Chile's Health Minister: "They are in an admirable mood and have solidarity and there is no doubt that they will tell us many details of all the time that they have been, underground in the mine. They have faced difficulties, but it is impressive how they have managed to maintain a spirit that is enviable and that we all admire." Copiapo 10. Various of children dressed up in carnival outfits at mine 11. Celestina Bugueno in front of trapped miners pictures pointing at her son's picture, Victor Zamora Bugueno 12. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Celestina Bugueno, Mother of trapped miner Victor Zamora Bugueno: "I am happy because my son is about to come out, and it is the Lord's miracle that my son is alive with the others. The Lord made a miracle and they are alive." 13. Wide of mine site with drills 14. Police at checkpoint outside mine Copiapo 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "Everything is going as we planned, we finished yesterday the process of taking out all the bars of the team. And also we did this controlled explosion, to enhance the landing of the Phoenix inside the tunnel. And we started this morning after the measuring of the hole we started this morning with the casing process. The process is going well, we have already sent three of the 15, 16 pipes that we are going to insert into the hole. And we are expecting no major problems." Copiapo 16. Wide of mine and camp 17. Mid of tents 18. Pull out of camp Copiapo 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "Well the operation should start during Wednesday, that's what we are expecting now. And the whole process should take something in the range of 48 hours. I mean two days, from the first rescue to the last rescue." Santiago 20. Various of newsstand and headlines 21. Various of newspapers showing picture of officials celebrating progress in rescue efforts 22. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Mario Gonzalez, Santiago resident: "It is great for the families of the miners and for the Chilean people it is a joy." 23. Mid of newspaper seller 24. Various of people reading newspapers in street STORYLINE: After more than two months trapped deep in a Chilean mine, 33 miners were tantalisingly close to rescue on Sunday. Drillers have completed an escape shaft, and Chile's mining minister says a video inspection shows the hole's walls are firm enough to allow the men to be hoisted out as early as Wednesday. Officials said late on Saturday that workers first must reinforce the top few hundred feet (almost 100 metres) of the tunnel and have begun welding steel pipes for that purpose. The completion of the 28-inch (71-centimetre)-diameter escape shaft on Saturday morning caused great excitement in the tent city known as "Camp Hope," where the miners' relatives had held vigil for an agonising 66 days since a cave-in sealed off the gold and copper mine on 5 August. Miners videotaped the piston-powered hammer drill's breakthrough at 2,041 feet (622 metres) underground and could be seen cheering and embracing, the drillers said. On the surface, the rescuers chanted, danced and sprayed champagne so excitedly that some of their hardhats tumbled off. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7c1ee3eb0223975352edcbf2c825cbc4 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 50 AP Archive
WRAP Health, Mining Ministers comment ADDS miners' relatives
 
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(10 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST Copiapo 1. Wide of mine site with cranes and drilling rigs Copiapo 2. Various of drill at mine site, mist Copiapo 3. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Chile's Health Minister: "They are in an admirable mood and have solidarity and there is no doubt that they will tell us many details of all the time that they have been, underground in the mine. They have faced difficulties, but it is impressive how they have managed to maintain a spirit that is enviable and that we all admire." 4. Mid of drill Copiapo 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "Everything is going as we planned. We finished yesterday the process of taking out all the bars of the team. And also we did this controlled explosion, to enhance the landing of the Phoenix inside the tunnel. And we started this morning after the measuring of the hole we started this morning with the casing process. The process is going well, we have already sent three of the 15, 16 pipes that we are going to insert into the hole. And we are expecting no major problems." Copiapo 6. Pull out of camp Copiapo 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "Well the operation should start during Wednesday, that's what we are expecting now, and the whole process should take something in the range of 48 hours. I mean two days, from the first rescue to the last rescue." Copiapo 8. Wide of Camp Hope area 9. Various of people singing at Camp Hope 10. Various of trapped miner's family preparing a fire 11. Various of families sitting by their tents 12. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Belgica Ramirez, sister-in-law of trapped miner Franco Lopez: "We are getting anxious while waiting for our family members to be pulled out, but we're happy." Copiapo 13. Various of children dressed up in carnival outfits at mine 14. Celestina Bugueno in front of trapped miners pictures pointing at her son's picture, Victor Zamora Bugueno 15. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Celestina Bugueno, Mother of trapped miner Victor Zamora Bugueno: "I am happy because my son is about to come out, and it is the Lord's miracle that my son is alive with the others. The Lord made a miracle and they are alive." Copiapo 16. Top shot of camp hope with miners relatives and press 17. Set up shot of Franco Utili, Emergency doctor at Chilean Catholic University 18. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Franco Utili, emergency doctor at Chilean Catholic University: "Once they are pulled out the main problem is going to be the Post Traumatic Syndrome which could affect them in a percentage from 2 to 15 percent. This is a syndrome that can cause problems with sleep, nightmares, anger attacks, changes in eating habits and all this can be caused by the person re-living the moment of the rescue or of when they got stranded inside the mine. This could provoke a disability from the psychological and psychiatric point of view." 19. Chilean flags around the mine site, man walking through it Santiago 20. Various of newsstand and headlines 21. Various of newspapers showing picture of officials celebrating progress in rescue efforts 22. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Mario Gonzalez, Santiago resident: "It is great for the families of the miners and for the Chilean people it is a joy." 23. Mid of newspaper seller STORYLINE: After more than two months trapped deep in a Chilean mine, 33 miners were tantalisingly close to rescue on Sunday and officials said they were so giddy with confidence of success they were arguing over who would be the last one out. Drillers have completed an escape shaft, and Chile's mining minister says a video inspection shows the hole's walls are firm enough to allow the men to be hoisted out as early as Wednesday. Another concern is blood clotting. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/b206bd04176fbbc4f215e286e5da1071 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 11 AP Archive
Continued coverage of  preps for rescue of 33 trapped miners
 
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(8 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 8 October 2010 1. Various of "Plan B" drilling site 2. Various shots miners' family members at their camp 3. Wide of Chilean Mining Minister, Laurence Golborne, and others walking to press area 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "After the break of the tunnel (= the drill breaking through into the mine), the best scenario could be 3-4 days to start the rescue process. The rescue process itself could take 2 days more or less; if we do a full casing of the holes, those 3-4 days could go to 8-10 days." 5. Medium shot Plan B operations 6. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Chilean Health Minister: "We are extremely satisfied to be able to announce that we will be completely ready to face this challenge from the evening of next Monday, the 11th of October." 7. Wide of Chilean flags and banners in support of the miners 8. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Chilean Health Minister: "Various of them have intense dental problems which we are helping with antibiotics. And of course many of them have skin problems. We are also monitoring their psychological well-being through our video and telephone connections. This is all going to be checked from the moment they come out until they are released from the hospital." 9. Wide of Plan B drilling site 10. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jaime Manalich, Chilean Health Minister: "For the last few days, we have been asking all the miners to do much more intense regular physical activity, in order to test their reactions to stress, to simulate the emotion and the tension that they will experience during the rescue phase." 7 October 2010 11. Various of family members lighting candle 12. Wide of family members around fire 13. Close-up of woman with eyes closed 14. Various of drilling site STORYLINE Excitement grew on Friday outside the mine where 33 men have been trapped for more than two months, as a drill carving an escape shaft was pushing through the final section of rock above their underground chamber. "Today could be a great day," tweeted Chilean Mining Minister Laurence Golborne, quoting a song by Spanish Catalan singer Joan Manuel Serrat. Health Minister Jaime Manalich, speaking briefly as he arrived at the mine, raised expectations even more by repeating "Tuesday" back to reporters who asked if the men could be pulled out that day. The "Plan B" drill is just metres away from winning a three-way race to reach the miners with a hole wide enough to accommodate their escape capsule. "Plan A" and "Plan C" had to slow down after repeatedly veering off course in recent days. Manalich said the drill paused on Friday morning for a maintenance check before the final push. New depth figures weren't released, but a technician working with the T130 drill told The Associated Press that just 128 feet (39 metres) remained before the drill breaks through to the miners at 2,047 feet (624 metres) below ground. The technician spoke on condition of anonymity because only top government officials and rescue coordinators are authorised to talk to the media. The T130 is aiming at a workshop that isn't as deep underground as the refuge where the miners happened to be eating when 700,000 tons of rock collapsed on 5 August in the middle section of the gold and copper mine, which runs like a corkscrew for more than four miles (7 kilometres) below a rocky hill in Chile's vast northern Atacama desert. Once the drilling is complete, a video camera will be lowered through the shaft to help determine whether the miners can be pulled up through the exposed rock, or must wait for the shaft to be encased with steel piping to reduce the risk of something going wrong. Manalich also spoke about the miners' health. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/094d47f1c04015fb07e8f0cbe010d119 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 50 AP Archive
Miner recently freed from mine returns to scene with family members
 
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(16 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Wide of entrance to the San Jose mine, group of people at the site 2. Mid shot rescued miner Jose Henriquez with wife and some relatives 3. Henriquez and police officer entering mine grounds 4. Wide of the group 5. Various of Enriquez with police officers, relatives and mine workers touring Camp Hope 6. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jose Henriquez, rescued miner: "It is a joy to be free, I'm so happy to be back in this place so I can thank the Lord I'm with my family again. I wanted to see this place and see where my family spent so long waiting for me." 7. Cutaway of Enriquez 8. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jose Henriquez, rescued miner: (Q: What were you thinking when you came?) "On my way here I was thinking I'd like to go back to the mine to work again..." (he laughs) "That was a joke!" 9. Various of Jose Henriquez talking to police officers 10. Enriquez and his family getting into car 11. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Esteban Henriquez, nephew of Jose Henriquez and family spokesman: "The truth is he's the same person, we have had a marvellous experience, happy with the ending it had, and hoping it never happens again, not with our people, and not with any other miner, whether here in this country or anywhere else in the world." 12. Car leaving STORYLINE One of the 33 rescued Chilean miners, Jose Henriquez, returned to the San Jose mine near Copiapo with relatives on Saturday to tour Camp Hope, the camp set up at the mine by miners' families, where they anxiously waited 69 days for the men to rescued earlier this week. Fifty-five-year-old Henriquez had worked as a miner for 33 years. In January this year, he had been involved in another accident at the mine which had also almost cost him his life. An Evangelical, he was considered the "spiritual leader" of the miners, and had asked for 33 bibles when contact with the miners was finally established 17 days after the initial collapse. He then directed prayers twice a day in the underground cavern. Henriquez and his family were welcomed at the San Jose mine on Saturday morning by police officers and members of the rescue teams still on site. "I'm so happy to be back in this place so I can thank the Lord I'm with my family again. I wanted to see this place and see where my family spent so long waiting for me," he told journalists who followed him to the mine. His family, like all the others, had a tent where different relatives took turns camping out to await new developments in the rescue operation. But his wife of 33 years, Hettiz Barrios, was one of the few who did not move to Camp Hope permanently. In one of his letters to his family, Henriquez had expressly asked her to carry on her life as normal. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/348a781ca703da9573ddca4215079b2e Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 21 AP Archive
Relatives send notes, more equipment arrives, minister
 
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(25 Aug 2010) SHOTLIST AP TELEVISION ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Rescue worker writing message on capsule being sent down to miners 2. Wide of miners' relatives clapping, holding Chilean flag 3. Wide of truck carrying drill driving through applauding crowd 4. Relatives clapping 5. Wide of camp 6. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "It is a process which is moving forwards, where the doctors are establishing with each individual at this stage what their condition is from a physical and psychological point of view, in order to move forward to the next step. As has been said, they're stable and have received letters of support." 7. Crowd walking through camp 8. Soldiers standing with relatives 9. Various of woman reading letter by torchlight STORYLINE Rescue workers and relatives at Chile's San Jose mine cheered the arrival on Tuesday of the last piece of an enormous machine with diamond-tipped drills that will try to rescue 33 miners who have been trapped deep underground for 19 days. The machine, carried on a truck festooned with Chilean flags, is capable of carving a 26-inch (66-centimetre) -wide tunnel through solid rock and boring at about 65 feet (20 metres). It was donated by the state-owned Codelco copper company. Just setting it up will take at least three more days. The miners have settled in for a long wait until a tunnel wide enough to pull them out can be carved through a half-mile of solid rock. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera vowed not to abandon the trapped miners in a telephone conversation Tuesday afternoon with Luis Urzua, the 54-year-old shift foreman who has been the miners' leader. The miners were plunged into darkness by the August 5 collapse of the main shaft of a gold and silver mine that runs like a corkscrew for more than 4 miles (7 kilometres) under a barren mountain in northern Chile's Atacama Desert. They gained contact with the outside world Sunday when rescuers drilled a narrow bore-hole down to their living-room-sized shelter after seven failed attempts. The miners said they conserved the use of their helmet lamps, their only source of light other than a handful of vehicles whose engines contaminate the air supply. They fired up a bulldozer to carve into a natural water deposit, but otherwise minimised using the vehicles. The miners can still reach many chambers and access ramps in the lower reaches of the mine, and have used a separate area some distance from their reinforced emergency refuge as their bathroom. But they have mostly stayed in the refuge, where they knew rescuers would try to reach them. The room has become stiflingly hot and stuffy. Leaving it allows them to breathe better air, but wandering too far is risky in the unstable mine, which has suffered several rock collapses since the initial accident. Rescue efforts advanced considerably on Tuesday as a third bore-hole prepared to break through to the miners, and a huge machine arrived from central Chile for carving a tunnel just wide enough for the miners to be pulled out one-by-one. Andres Sougarret, the rescue effort's leader, estimated it would take three to four months to get the men out. Meanwhile, three 6-inch-wide (15-centimetre) shafts will serve as the miners' "umbilical cords" - one for supplies, another for communications and a third to guarantee their air supply. A steady flow of emergency supplies was sent down Tuesday in a rocket-shaped metal tube called a "paloma," Spanish for dove. The paloma is 5� feet (1.6 metres) long and takes a full hour to descend through the bore-hole. entrance, where cold nights end in a chilly fog. There's a bonfire to keep warm, and barbecue and other food donated by the local government in a common tent. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7030195f0fa176d5d2a0e816dbbca529 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 33 AP Archive
Efforts to keep alive 33 miners trapped in mine for 4 weeks
 
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(5 Sep 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Wide exterior of families camp site, next to collapsed mine 2. Security at camp 3. Mid of families' tents 4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Alberto Avalos, relative of miners, Florencio and Renan Avalos Silva: "You know, today is the month anniversary, initially we thought this would take 15 or 20 days, maximum. But now we know that it's a long term project, that we have two or three months ahead. We already have one month of waiting and we are not very calm. It is hard to imagine it, being 700 and something metres underground, being buried down there, a month...yes, things become more complicated." 5. Wide of Avalos family tent 6. Mid of relatives in their tents 7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) No name given, sister of trapped miner: "My feelings are the same since the first day, a sad feeling because they are down there and also a happy feeling because they are fighting to get them out. So while they are down there, we will be up here supporting them one way or another, giving them strength, they feel that we are here giving them strength. Yesterday I got a letter from my brother saying he's happy to know that we are here and that it gives them courage." 8. Wide of the hill with 33 flags to mark the trapped miners 9. Mid of flags 10. Wide of drilling machines working 11. Mid of a Drill T-130, which was due to start working on Sunday 12. Close up of Drill Strata 950, which has been drilling for a week 13. Pan of both machines 14. Wide of site STORYLINE The families of 33 Chilean miners trapped underground after a shaft collapsed at the mine in Copiapo where they were working marked the one month anniversary of their ordeal on Sunday. On August 5, a landslide at the gold and copper mine in the Atacama desert caused a tunnel to collapse and entombed the men more than 2,200 feet (67.6 metres) below ground. It took 17 days for rescuers to make their first contact with the miners and find out they were all alive and well. Families have been holding a vigil by camping out close to the mine, sending messages to their loved ones to keep their spirits up. On Saturday they managed to talk via a video link with their relatives below ground. A miner's sister, who is living at the camp, said she got a letter from her brother saying that he's "happy to know that we are here and that it gives them courage." Alberto Avalos, who has two relatives trapped, Florencio and Renan Avalos Silva, said that he couldn't imagine what they were going through. "It is hard to imagine it, being 700 and something metres underground, being buried down there, a month...yes, things become more complicated," he said. Back up drills were also on site to help dig the vital rescue tunnel. Doctors, psychologists, authorities and relatives have avoided - on purpose - mentioning how many weeks or months the rescue will take in any communication they have had with the trapped miners. Engineers estimated that digging a tunnel big enough to extract the miners could take up to four months if everything goes according to plan. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ea7333f4d511d631d8790f2f26f0eb24 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 60 AP Archive
Early morning scenes of mine, relatives' camp as rescue continue
 
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(24 Aug 2010) San Jose mine, Copiapo - 24 August 2010 ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Pan from "Campamento Esperanza" (Hope Camp) to drilling machines with flags 2. Policemen guarding gate to enter the mine 3. Various of drilling machines working 4. Various of religious images set up on improvised altars 5. Mid of piece of paper reading (Spanish) "Thank you Virgin (Mary) for listening to us 6. Various of tents of relatives of miners STORYLINE: The 33 miners trapped deep underground thanked their rescuers on Tuesday and settled in for a long wait until a tunnel wide enough to pull them out can be carved through a half-mile of solid rock. Raising hopes further, a second bore hole punched into the chamber where the miners are entombed, and a third probe was nearing the spot on Tuesday. After parcelling out tiny bits of food and drinking water carved from the mine floor with a backhoe for 18 days, the miners were getting glucose and rehydration tablets to restore their digestive systems. Capsules carrying oxygen also were sent down through a six-inch (15 centimetre) bore hole to help the men survive the hot, stuffy, humid conditions in the lower reaches of the gold and copper mine. The bore holes also will be used to lower communication lines and to provide ventilation, the Chilean Mining Minister said. Meanwhile, the miners were sending up notes to their families in the same supply capsules on Tuesday, providing solace to people who have held vigil in the chilly Atacama desert since the August 5 collapse. Their ordeal, however, is far from over. Above ground, doctors and psychological experts are debating how to keep the miners sane during the estimated four months it will take to dig a tunnel large enough to get them out of the safety chamber 2,200 feet (670 meters) underground, where they have been buried since August 5. Rescuers sent down questionnaires on Monday to determine each man's condition, along with medicine and small microphones to enable them to speak with their families during their long wait. A rescue leader said officials are organising the families into small groups to keep their talks as orderly as possible. Meanwhile, an enormous machine with diamond-tipped drills capable of carving a 26-inch (66-centimetre) -wide tunnel through solid rock and boring at about 65 feet (20 meters) a day was on its way from central Chile to the mine, outside Copiapo in north-central Chile. The miners' relatives are suing and claim their loved ones were put at risk working in a mine known for unstable shafts and rock falls. Company executives have denied the accusations and say the lawsuits could force them into bankruptcy. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/26e3271b2c61bd83678280169c053bc6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 13 AP Archive
Chilean Miners Sue Lawyers for Fraud Relating to 2010 Rockfall
 
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9 of the 33 miners involved in a rockfall incident in Chile in 2010 will sue their lawyers after they claim to have been conned out of compensation and royalty fees
10th, 11th and 12th miners brought to the surface, Morales
 
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(13 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Video showing capsule carrying tenth Chilean miner to be rescued Alex Vega beginning journey to surface 2. Tilt down of rescue rig 3. Alex Vega's wife awaiting rescue 4. Capsule emerging from underground UPSOUND Cheering 5. Various of Vega coming out of capsule UPSOUND Cheering 6. Vega hugging his wife 7. Vega pointing to message on his T-shirt UPSOUND Cheering, going over to thank officials 8. Vega getting on stretcher 9. Vega being wheeled towards triage unit 10. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera with Bolivian President Evo Morales at mine head 11. Various of rescue workers, capsule emerging from underground carrying eleventh Chilean miner to be rescued Jorge Galleguillos 12. Various of Galleguillos coming out of capsule, onlookers including Pinera and Morales USPOUND Cheering 13. Galleguillos hugging his brother 14. Galleguillos hugging Pinera 15. Pinera and Morales visiting miners in hospital, Morales hugging Bolivian miner Carlos Mamani 16. Pinera and Morales standing with Mamani, zoom in on framed message from Mamani's family 17. Mid shot of mine head and rescue workers 18. Girlfriend of 12th miner to be rescued Edison Pena Villarroel awaiting capsule, speaking with Pinera and Morales 19. Various of family and rescuers clapping as capsule emerges from underground 20. Close of Villarroel's girlfriend, Angelica Alvarez, crying 21. Villarroel getting out of capsule 22. Various of Villarroel hugging girlfriend 23. Villarroel hugging Pinera STORYLINE One by one, the miners trapped for 69 days in a dungeon that could have been their tomb have climbed into a rescue capsule and made a smooth ascent to the surface, greeted by the embraces of loved ones, cheered by joyous Chileans and watched by a captivated world. The anxiety that had accompanied the careful final days of preparation broke on Wednesday just after midnight, when the first of the miners, Florencio Avalos, emerged from the missile-like chamber and smiled broadly after his half-mile journey to fresh air. By late morning, 13 men had been pulled from the mine at a methodical pace in roughly 10 hours in a rescue effort free of any significant problems. It was on track to end before the sun rises on Thursday. The tenth man to emerge was 31-year-old Alex Vega, who is married with two children, and had been saving to buy a house and move out of his parents' home before the accident happened. He was warmly greeted by his wife at the mine shaft as he made it to the surface. The lone foreigner among the miners, Carlos Mamani of Bolivia, was visited at a nearby clinic by Chilean President Sebastian Pinera and Bolivian President Evo Morales. The miner could be heard telling the Chilean president how nice it was to breathe fresh air and see the stars. Miner number eleven to be rescued was 55-year-old Jorge Galeguillos, who emerged as Morales and Pinera stood nearby. He was greeted by one of his 13 brothers as he finally reached the surface. Galeguillos has been injured in at least two earlier mining accidents and requires medication for hypertension. No one in recorded history has survived as long trapped underground as the 33 men. For the first 17 days after 700,000 tons of rock collapsed around them on August 5, no one even knew whether they were alive. In the weeks that followed, the world was transfixed by their endurance and unity. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2633d3c249a06e6fd313703b0ced3dbc Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 58 AP Archive
China says mining accident that trapped 181 workers was a natural disaster
 
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Beijing - 22 August 2007 1. Wide interior of State Council news conference 2. Cutaway of media 3. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Li Xueju, Minister of Civil Affairs of China: "The accident in the coal mine in Shandong, which was caused by a natural disaster, is different from other natural disasters because it happened during production, so I believe the government and enterprise will give assistance to the families of those injured and killed." FILE: Shandong province - 19 August 2007 4. Various of people working to move sandbags in effort to rescue miners trapped in flooded coal mine 5. Various of coal mine 6. Various of men working on pipes to be used to pump out flood water FILE: Shandong province - 20 August 2007 7. Wide of relatives of miners trapped 8. Woman crying surrounded by supporters 9. Relatives of trapped miners 10. Wide of relatives of trapped miners STORYLINE: A Chinese Cabinet minister sought on Wednesday to portray a mining accident that left 181 miners trapped and presumed dead as a "natural disaster", deflecting criticism that more could have been done to save the workers Civil Affairs Minister Li Xueju said at a news conference in Beijing that the accident in the coal mine in Shandong was caused by a "natural disaster." The miners - 172 in a mine belonging to the Huayuan Mine Co. and nine in a smaller nearby mine - have been trapped since Friday afternoon when heavy rains undermined a river dike. But questions have been raised about why Huayuan sent miners into the nearly 1-thousand metre-deep (3,300-foot-deep) shaft as the flooding threat grew - and other mines in the area closed. Riot police were stationed on Wednesday for a second day at the mine offices to silence angry relatives of the trapped miners. Police tape was strung up 35 metres (yards) outside the company's gate. Behind the cordon about a dozen riot police sat with helmets and plastic shields. About 20 mining company officials, employees and plainclothes security were also on hand. An information officer for the Tai-an District, which includes Xintai City 600 kilometres (370 miles) southeast of Beijing where the mine is located, said he did not know specifically why the riot police had been deployed. Tempers boiled over on Monday and several relatives of a missing miner smashed a reception window and display cases at a company office. China's coal mine industry is the most dangerous in the world. Coal feeds most of China's energy needs, but accidents kill an average of 13 miners a day. State media have reported that there is little hope of survival for the miners. On Tuesday, technical experts involved in the rescue acknowledged the difficulty of draining the mine where 172 miners have been trapped. The government's Xinhua News Agency quoted one expert as saying it may take "100 days to drain the floodwater." Some families have been ordered not to leave hotels or talk to other miners' families, according to two relatives of a trapped miner who said they sneaked out of their hotel. Mining company officials also visited families and told them to stay at home. Some families said they received 2-thousand yuan (265 US dollars) - more than two months of the average miners' wages - to keep quiet. The accident comes at a particularly sensitive time, with China's Communist Party preparing for a once-every-five-years congress. Large-scale accidents like the mine flood present a test for the communist leadership to prove it can deliver on pledges to improve farmers' and workers' lives. Many of the families have privately said they believe the miners are dead and want the government to ensure adequate compensation. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6bc50adf52198d820e2c847e3e52d278 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 323 AP Archive
Latest on rescue attempt after drill breaks through to miners
 
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(9 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Wide of mine, drilling machines in the background 2. Medium of the T-130, the drilling machine that reached the shelter 3. Various of truck arriving with tubes to secure shaft 4. Relatives applauding 5. More of the truck 6. Set up shot of Jeff Hart, drilling operations manager 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jeff Hart, drilling operations manager working for the rescue teams: "As you can imagine, it erupted. We have been here busting our butts, we have worked everyday, we fought the odds. We fought till the very end, we made it into the gallery, it's incredible. The whole place just explode it, it was great." 8. Relatives hugging more relatives arriving to the mine to assist to the rescue STORYLINE: A drilling rig punched through to the underground shelter where 33 miners have been trapped for 66 agonising days under the Chilean desert, raising cheers, tears and hopes on Saturday. Relatives waiting at "Camp Hope" on the surface waved Chilean flags and shouted with joy as word spread of the breakthrough, and one man frantically rang a bell even before a siren sounded to officially confirm that the escape shaft had reached the miners. They are still several days away from rescue: Engineers must first check the shaft and decide whether to reinforce it before pulling them to the surface. The "Plan B" drill won a three-way race against two other drills to carve a hole wide enough for an escape capsule to pull the miners out one by one. While "Plan A" and "Plan C" stalled after repeatedly veering off course, the "Plan B" drill reached the miners at a point 2,041 feet (622 metres) below the surface, after 33 days of drilling. The milestone thrilled Chileans, who have come to see the rescue drama as a test of the nation's character and pride, and eased some anxiety among the miners' families. But now comes a difficult judgment call: The rescue team must decide whether it's more risky to pull the miners through unreinforced rock, or to insert tons of heavy steel pipe into the curved shaft to protect the miners on their way up. Those in charge of the rescue say the decision on how to proceed next will be a purely technical one. Steel pipe would prevent stones from falling and potentially jamming the capsule, but it wouldn't save a miner if the unstable mine suffers another major collapse, and might itself provoke a disastrous setback, Mining minister Laurence Golborne said. The miners will be initially examined at a field hospital where they can briefly reunited with up to three close relatives. Then, they'll be flown by helicopter in small groups to the regional hospital in Copiapo, were a wing of 33 fresh beds await to care for them for no fewer than 48 hours. Only after their physical and mental health is thoroughly examined will they be allowed to go home. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6852472d88e25f11f16ecaad8e5fa79b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 279 AP Archive
Upper Big Branch Mine Disaster
 
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Don Blankenship and the Upper Big Branch Mine Disaster. People For Free Speech
Views: 557 chris forde
One month since collapse; miners underground
 
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(5 Sep 2010) 1. Wide of relatives, journalists and authorities climbing up hill near mine entrance 2. Wide of crowd on top of the hill gathered for brief ceremony to mark one month since miners became trapped 3. Various of Chilean Mining Minister Laurence Golborne arriving and shaking hands with some of the relatives 4. Top shot zoom out of camp site set up at entrance of mine, AUDIO: mine alarm sounding, names of trapped miners read out, followed by "Viva!" from the crowd 5. Various of Golborne reading the names of the 33 miners, after each name the crowd says "Viva!" 6. Pan of crowd on hill with mine below 7. Mid of Golborne arriving to talk to the media 8. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "Today we commemorate the one month anniversary since these 33 courageous miners are there, deep down underground, trapped and isolated. It is a moment of great emotion, a moment for meditation; this is not a moment for celebration, it is a moment of hope so we can in the shortest period of time possible bring them back to the surface, reunite them with their families and be able to end this rescue operation." 9. Exterior of mine where camp site has been set up for relatives 10. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Alberto Avalos, relative of miners Florencio and Renan Avalos Silva: "You know, today is the month anniversary, well yesterday. We never would have thought it would take a month, initially we thought this would take 15 or 20 days, maximum. But now we know that is a long term project, that we have 2 or 3 months ahead. We have already been waiting one month and we are not very calm. It is hard to come to terms with it." 11. Wide of Avalos' family tent 12. More of relatives at camp site 13. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) No name given, sister of trapped miner: "My feelings are the same since the first day, a sad feeling because they are down there and also a happy feeling because they are fighting to get them out. So while they are down there, we will be up here supporting them one way or another, giving them strength." 14. Wide of the hill with 33 Chilean flags, one for each trapped miner 15. Medium of flags STORYLINE The families of 33 Chilean miners trapped underground after a shaft collapsed at the San Jose mine in Copiapo marked the one month anniversary of their ordeal on Sunday. Chilean Mining Minister Laurence Golborne was at the mine to mark the occasion, and he read out the names of each of the miners, followed by cheers from the crowd of family members. Golborne said it was "a moment of great emotion, a moment for meditation; this is not a moment for celebration, it is a moment of hope so we can in the shortest period of time possible bring them back to the surface, reunite them with their families and be able to end this rescue operation." On August 5, a landslide at the gold and copper mine in the Atacama desert caused a tunnel to collapse and entombed the men more than 2,200 feet (67.6 metres) below ground. It took 17 days for rescuers to make their first contact with the miners and find out they were all alive and well. Families have been holding a vigil by camping out close to the mine, sending messages to their loved ones to keep their spirits up. On Saturday they managed to talk via a video link with their relatives below ground. A miner's sister, who is living at the camp, said "My feelings are the same since the first day, a sad feeling because they are down there and also a happy feeling because they are fighting to get them out. So while they are down there, we will be up here supporting them one way or another, giving them strength." Alberto Avalos, who has two relatives trapped, Florencio and Renan Avalos Silva, said that he couldn't imagine what they were going through. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d2427a0aa5f8347e519abf5e5eddb35c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 47 AP Archive
As members of the rescue team that brought 33 miners out of a collapsed Chilean mine last week, afte
 
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HEADLINE: The Untold Story: Rescuing Chilean miners CAPTION: As members of the rescue team that brought 33 miners out of a collapsed Chilean mine last week, after spending more than two months underground, packed up they took the AP on an exclusive tour of the rescue effort from the inside. (Oct. 20) THE RESCUE TEAM THAT HELPED 33 CHILEAN MINERS SURVIVE MORE THAN TWO MONTHS UNDERGROUND BEFORE THE MEN WERE RESCUED LAST WEEK IS PACKING UP AND PULLING OUT -- AFTER GIVING THE ASSOCIATED PRESS AN EXCLUSIVE LOOK AT THE RESCUE EFFORT FROM INSIDE. (#1-Matt) (Fabricio Morales, Micomo) "This room is the workshop where the rescue capsule arrived ... It's where they helped the miners get into the capsule. They fitted them with a security harness and gave them a medical check-up and after a pre-established protocol the capsule was raised." ENGINEER MATIAS RETAMAL AND HIS COLLEAGUE FABRICIO MORALES SHOWED THE AP SOME OF THE INVENTIONS CREATED FOR COMMUNICATING WITH AND NOURISHING THE TRAPPED MINERS. (#2-Lee) (engineer Matias Retamal of Micomo) "When we wanted to send water, we used this system and down there they had some containers to store the water. So we cut the air and pumped the water, about 40 to 80 liters per day, depending on their needs. And after the water was pumped the valve was closed and we opened this other valve and pumped enriched oxygen to them." AS RESCUERS ESTABLISHED A STRATEGY TO SUSTAIN THE MINER'S PHYSICALLY A NEARLY A HALF MILE UNDERGROUND THEY ALSO GAVE THE MEN A PSYCHOLOGICAL BOOST--A CONNECTION TO THEIR FAMILY AND FRIENDS ABOVE. (#1-Matt) (Fabricio Morales, Micomo) "This was used for the video conference. We had images from them from underneath and more important that their relatives were able to see them." WHILE RESCUERS WORKED AND THE MINERS' FAMILIES HELD VIGIL ABOVE ENGINEERS ENDEAVORED TO KEEP THE MEN ENTERTAINED AND CONNECTED TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD. (#1-Matt) (Fabricio Morales, Micomo) "We're going to take you to where the first video conferences for the families were done. And a very important day for us was Tuesday the 7th. September 7th we were able to deliver the ukraine versus Chile soccer game for the miners. It was very important to us because we love soccer." FOR CHILEANS, THE RESUCE EFFORT WAS A SOURCE OF NATIONAL PRIDE. NOW THE RESCUED MINERS ARE ATTEMPTING TO MOVE ON WITH THEIR LIVES. AND THE CAPSULE THAT WAS USED TO RESCUE THEM HAS GONE ON DISPLAY IN CHILE'S CAPITAL OF SANTIAGO. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c430cd494822cf2d57ffe80977f6f972 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 142 AP Archive
Over 3,000 workers trapped in gold mine, after shaft collapse
 
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SHOTLIST ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Various of entrance to mine shaft 2. Close of sign reading: (English) The Harmony Way 3. Mid shot of sign with entrance to mine shaft in background 4. Various of rescued miners coming out of mine shaft 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Patrice Motsepe, Chairman of Harmony Gold Mining Company: "The situation is under control, the first one hundred and fifty people are safe on surface and the process of bring the rest out the mine is proceeding successfully." 6. Cutaway of cameraman 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Senzeni Zokwana, President of the South African National Union of Mineworkers: "The lives of our members can be in danger. Suppose there is fire underground and the shaft is damaged, how would workers come out (from) underground? I think the lesson is that we need to put safety (at) number one in planning and make sure that at all times, people can be saved quickly." 8. Mineworkers standing around entrance to mine shaft STORYLINE: About 3,000 gold miners were trapped a mile underground on Wednesday when falling pipe damaged the elevator. However the company began rescuing workers through a smaller shaft and estimated it would take 10 hours to get them all out. Early on Thursday morning, a company official said about 350 miners had been evacuated from the mine so far. There were no injuries and there was no immediate danger to any of the workers in Harmony Gold Mining Company's Elandsrand Mine, company and union officials said. Patrice Motsepe, the Chairman of Harmony Gold Mining Company told reporters that a number of miners had already been rescued and "the process of bring the rest out the mine is proceeding successfully." The miners were trapped at a level slightly more than a mile underground when a hydraulic pressure pipe blew out at a weld. The accident happened at 6:20 a.m (0420 GMT). Officials said by 4:15 a.m. (0215 GMT) about 350 miners had been evacuated from the mine. A regional chairman for the union, said there was ventilation for the miners still waiting underground and officials were in contact with the men by a telephone line in the mine. The official confirmed that the trapped miners were in good condition but were hungry, angry and frustrated with the situation. Senzeni Zokwana, the president of the National Union of Mineworkers, said the accident should be a wake-up call for the industry. "I think the lesson is that we need to put safety (at) number one in planning and make sure that at all times, people can be saved quickly," said Zokwana. A spokesman for the union charged that the mine was not properly maintained - but Harmony executives dismissed union criticism saying the shaft was in very good condition with a lot of new infrastructure. According to a government Mine Health and Safety Council report in September, 199 mineworkers died in accidents, mostly rock falls over the past year. South Africa is the world's largest producer of gold as well as a number of other minerals. Harmony's Elandsrand mine is the third largest producing gold mine in South Africa - the company said it produces an average of about 600 kilogrammes (1320 pounds) of gold every month. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e423e57adafeb5a6bb12e0270e929cb9 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 899 AP Archive
Chile - Trapped miners released
 
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(14 Oct 2010) 661081 Chile - Rescuers complete key work as part of efforts to free 33 men AP TELEVISION Copiapo - 11 Oct 2010 1. Wide of crane removing T-130 drill equipment 2. Mid T-130 being lowered 661384 Chile - Final miner surfaces, celebration POOL Copiapo - 13 Oct 2010 3. Thirty-third and last miner, Luis Urzua, inside capsule, being readied for journey to the surface 4. Rescue workers outside tunnel exit 5. Urzua inside capsule, capsule being lifted up and disappearing from view, rescuers left behind underground celebrate 6. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera and first lady Cecilia Morel clapping and cheering 7. Capsule surfacing, crowd cheering 8. Urzua inside capsule, relative looking on 9. Pinera embracing rescue worker after assessing that all miners are out and in good condition 661457 Chile - President Sebastian Pinera visits miners in hospital, presser POOL Copiapo - 14 Oct 2010 10. Wide of rescued Chilean miners standing in hospital ward, zoom in on Chilean President Sebastian Pinera hugging miners 11. Various of Pinera greeting miners 12. Wide of group photograph in hospital ward STORYLINE: On October 13th the last of the Chilean miners, the foreman who held them together when they were feared lost, was raised from the depths of the earth - a joyous ending to a 69-day ordeal that riveted the world. No one has ever been trapped so long and survived. Luis Urzua ascended smoothly through 2,000 feet (610 metres) of rock, completing a 22 and a half-hour rescue operation that unfolded with remarkable speed and flawless execution. Before a jubilant crowd of about 2,000 people, he became the 33rd miner to be rescued. Urzua, 54, was the shift commander at the time of the disaster, and used all his wits and his leadership talents to help his men stay calm and in control for the 17 harrowing days it took for rescuers to make their first contact with them. Under Urzua's leadership, the men stretched an emergency food supply meant to last just 48 hours over 2 and a half weeks, taking tiny sips of milk and bites of tuna fish every other day. They conserved use of their helmet lamps, their only source of light other than a handful of vehicles. They fired up a bulldozer to carve into a natural water deposit, but otherwise minimised using the vehicles that contaminated the available air. The rescue exceeded expectations every step of the way. Officials first said it might be four months before they could get the men out; it turned out to be 69 days and about 8 hours. Once the escape tunnel was finished, they estimated it would take 36 to 48 hours to get all the miners to the surface. That got faster as the operation went along, and all the men were safely above ground in 22 hours, 37 minutes. The rescue workers who talked the men through the final hours still had to be hoisted to the surface. One by one throughout the day, the men had emerged to the cheers of exuberant Chileans and before the eyes of a transfixed globe. While the operation picked up speed as the day went on, each miner was greeted with the same boisterous applause from rescuers. They rejoined a world intensely curious about their ordeal, and certain to offer fame and jobs. Previously unimaginable riches awaited men who had risked their lives going into the unstable gold and copper mine for about $1,600 a month. Beginning at midnight on October 12th, and sometimes as quickly as every 25 minutes, the pod was lowered the nearly half-mile to where 700-thousand tons of rock collapsed August 5th and entombed the men. Then, after a quick pep talk from rescue workers who had descended into the mine, a miner would climb in, make the journey upward and emerge from a manhole into the blinding sun. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/524d8a16f4171f561660552d360729f9 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 176 AP Archive
Mining minister comments on rescue operation
 
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(13 Oct 2010) SHOTLIST 1. Wide of officials working on rescue capsule 2. Close of officials working on capsule 3. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "As we have just said the capsules will continue to operate despite some minor problems that we have had. What we are doing now is doing some maintenance work for every few trips it does, where we re-check all the controls to make sure the capsule is operational." 4. Workers doing maintenance work 5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "This has produced a learning curve; therefore the people that operate the system, both above and below ground, are acquiring expertise in the operation and in the preparation of the miner before he comes out and also once he comes out. This has generated an improvement in the execution of the rescue which leads us to believe in a more optimistic timeline. That's why we believe it's going to be over by tonight." 6. Pan from sign to relative of Esteban Rojas sitting with Golborne and Chilean President Sebastian Pinera STORYLINE: Officials in Chile said they were on track to complete the rescue of 33 miners, trapped for 69 agonising days underground, by sunrise Thursday, if not sooner. The miners were hoisted one by one to freedom Wednesday, their rescue moving with remarkable speed while their countrymen erupted in cheers and the world watched transfixed. Chile's Mining Minister Laurence Golborne said from the rescue site on Wednesday that the experience gained from the rescues so far meant that the rescue workers have gained "expertise in the operation and in the preparation of the miner before he comes out and also once he comes out." "This has generated an improvement in the execution of the rescue which leads us to believe in a more optimistic timeline. That's why we believe it's going to be over by tonight," he said. Beginning at midnight and sometimes as quickly as once every 30 minutes, the men climbed into a slender cage nearly a half-mile underground and made a smooth ascent into fresh air on Wednesday. By early afternoon, more than half the men had been rescued. Golborne also said workers were confident the capsules used to rescue the men would continue to work efficiently, "despite some minor problems that we have had." He said workers were now carrying out regular maintenance on the capsules to ensure they remained operational throughout the rescue operation. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/b8b6d10f8daa0eff2848e95ccea5c56b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 48 AP Archive
Bore hole for rescue reaches miners, reactions
 
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(18 Sep 2010) GOVERNMENT TV 1. Zoom into drill 2. Close up of drill 3. Medium of miners with flashlights 4. Close up of drill 5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Mario Sepulveda, trapped miner: "We want all of Chile and everyone around the world to know that we are really happy for what has been achieved today. Thank you so much to the government, thank you so much to the business leaders and to all those who have been working their tails off for us." AP TELEVISION 6. Wide of mine and drills 7. Mid of "Plan A" drill 8. Mid of "Plan B" drill 9. Close of drillers and drill near hole 10. Mid of drill 11. Mid of drill extracting from hole 12. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Andre Sougarret, Search and rescue coordinator: "We have completed the first stage (of digging) on the Plan B drill. At 10:35 AM(1435 GMT), we reached the six-hundred and thirty metre mark. This means that we have now been able to expand the first perforation from 5 inches (12,7 cm) to 12 inches (30,5 cm)." 13. Mid of base of drill 14. Tilt down drill 15. Large mining truck driving near drill 16. Pan of red truck with "Plan B" written on side 17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Brandon Fisher, Centre Rock Incorporated driller: "We drill for oil and gas, we drill for water and minerals things like that, drilling for human life is a completely different task at hand, so much more important than anything else that we have ever drilled for in our careers." 18. Wide of "Camp Hope" 19. Mid of Cristina, relative of a trapped miner, and her daughter walking off of the bus 20. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Cristina, Relative of trapped miner: "You can only imagine how happy I am to know that they made such a breakthrough. To know that they will be able to get them out." 21. Mid of relatives embracing and celebrating 22. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Griselda Godoy, stepmother of trapped miner: "I am preparing this altar for when my family comes. We have bought some coal and some meat to have a nice barbeque when he comes out. We are doing this in honour of all the miners, not just for my family." 23. Wide of "Camp Hope" 24. Mid of relatives STORYLINE: Drilling equipment has pounded its way into one of the caverns of the San Jose copper and gold mine in Chile's Atacama desert where 33 miners have been trapped for a month and a half. The bore hole that was completed ahead of schedule on Friday has raised hopes that the men can be pulled out earlier than expected. The 12-inch-wide (30-centimetre-wide) drill guided by a pilot hole half its diameter reached 2,070 feet (633 metres) beneath the surface, puncturing the top of a passage near the chamber where the men have taken refuge. The next step is to place a wider drill on the rig and start a hole 28 inches (71 centimetres) across - wide enough for the miners to get out. Video shot by the miners and released by the government later Friday showed scenes of bedlam below when the drill broke through, sending a shower of water and rock down into the chamber. "Viva Chile!" the miners cried, hugging each other and posing for the camera with broad smiles and headlamps beaming. "We want all of Chile and everyone around the world to know that we are really happy for what has been achieved today," said Mario Sepulveda, who has become a spokesman of sorts for his fellow miners and relays most communications from the depths. The government previously said it would take until early November to rescue the miners under the most optimistic scenario, but Mining Minister Laurence Golborne said they were now ahead of schedule. The earlier estimate had built in the possibility of more setbacks than the effort has seen so far, he said. Golborne did not provide a new estimate. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7eb3f1542283cd4d52cc882959acd19b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 101 AP Archive
Latest on efforts to free trapped miners
 
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(28 Aug 2010) SHOTLIST 28 August 2010 1. Wide of mine exterior and relatives camp site named Hope Camp 2. Mid of tents outside of mine, showing Chilean flags and signs supporting trapped miners 3. Various of Elizabeth Segovia, sister of trapped miner Dario Segovia walking around tent, getting logs and starting a bonfire 4. Close up of bonfire 5. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Elizabeth Segovia, sister of miner Dario Segovia: "We are calmer now, knowing that they are fine, getting food and everything else a person should be getting, but we won't be completely calm until they get out of there." 27 August 2010 6. Various of police officer with children playing with marionettes 7. Various of girls playing with a marionette 8. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Rodrigo Berger, chief of the Copiapo Police force: "We have many, many children here, children who are suffering in this place but we have to remember they are only children, they have their rights, they have to enjoy life as children. That's why we brought in a police officer who is very good with marionettes, who has travelled the country bringing joy to the children." 9. More of police officer playing with children at the camp 10. Close of little girl watching puppets 11. Medium of the marionettes 12. Medium of little girl watching the marionettes 13. Cutaway of members of the media at the camp site covering a news conference 14. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Andre Sougarret, Chief of rescue teams: We have said that the third conduct would help us to improve the ventilation but now we are evaluating if we use it as an alternative tunnel to rescue the miners." 15. Mid of Sougarret stepping out of the improvised podium STORYLINE: Relatives of the 33 trapped miners continued to camp outside the entrance to the San Jose mine in Copiapo on Saturday. Few rescues have taken more than two weeks, but Chilean officials have said that his rescue operation may take until Christmas. For Elizabeth Segovia, sister of one of the 33 trapped miners, the recent video footage of the men and the contact established between them and their relatives have helped to ease some of the initial despair. "We are calmer now, knowing they are fine, getting food and everything a person should be getting, but we won't be completely calm until they get out of there", she said. Each day, the families gathered outside the mine are waiting for news and praying for their trapped husbands, fathers, brothers and boyfriends. They stay on site, in tents, where cold nights end in a chilly fog. The local government has set up a communal tent where a cantina provides meals to everybody. A group of psychologists and psychiatrists are not only working with the trapped miners but also with their relatives trying to keep the morale high. Many children are also waiting among family members, and with at least a couple of months to go, authorities have started to take some initiatives to look after them. On Friday the Chilean Police Force brought in an officer who set up a marionette theatre for the children. The officer has been performing across the country for children who were victim of last February's earthquake and he is now trying to put a smile on the Copiapo children. "We have many, many children here. Children who are suffering in this place but we have to remember they are only children, they have their rights, they have to enjoy life as the children they are", said the Copiapo police chief. The miners were plunged into darkness by the August 5 collapse of the main shaft of a gold and copper mine that runs like a corkscrew for more than 4 miles (7 kilometres) under a barren mountain in northern Chile's Atacama Desert. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/33bbd499b3a07bf622470ef3d88fe5b7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Latest update on rescue effort to free  33 trapped miners
 
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(12 Sep 2010) 1. Wide of mine site 2. Entrance to the mine 3. Medium of workers of the mine 4. Set up shot of Chilean Mining Minister Laurence Golborne 5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "As you all know, there is a piece (of the drilling machine) stuck in the bottom of the shaft, we are trying to get it out. It's quite difficult because it was stuck too deep, but at least we managed to free it, so now it is loose, and now with a "spider" device, we'll try to retrieve it today. I hope we make it, if we do not, we will get into a more complex problem." 6. Various wides of the mine site 7. Wide of container with machinery needed for Plan C drilling being unloaded from a truck 8. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Laurence Golborne, Chilean Mining Minister: "Today we installed the multiple-use-shaft. Through it we can send them water, so we don't have to use the capsules anymore, we are sending a telephone signal, sound and optic fibre cable for images. So, right now, they are having a video-conference with their families. We are also sending air and also electricity, and that is a great novelty. We are giving them electricity and the miners, last night, they made some garlands and now they have light so they are now busy illuminating their habitat." 9. Various of truck arriving with machinery for Plan C 10. Closer of same, track passing by camera 11. Pick-up arriving with small cabin which will be used in the miners' eventual rescue STORYLINE: The drilling at the San Jose mine where 33 miners are trapped almost 700 metres underground had to stop momentarily on Saturday due to maintenance work and to the breakdown of one of the drilling machines. Chile is sparing no expense to rescue its miners, mounting three separate drilling efforts to carve escape tunnels through nearly a half-mile of solid rock and collapsed mine shafts. The fracture of the head of T-130 drilling machine - or Plan B - forced the rescue team to halt the work on Wednesday. The head struck an iron support beam for a mine shaft at 880 feet (268 metres), destroying a drill bit. For the past days, engineers have tried to let the broken piece loose on the shaft and later grab it with a specially made device. Mining minister Laurence Golborne told the media on Saturday morning that they would "try to retrieve it today." If they don't, the piece will be an obstacle for the drilling machine and Team B might have to start a new shaft. A spare part had to be urgently ordered in the United States and it is expected to arrive shortly. Team A, using a Strata 950 drilling machine which has - according to Chilean newspapers - reached down 203 metres (666 feet) so far, had to stop for a couples of hours for maintenance purposes. Meanwhile, workers and engineers began to assemble on Saturday the Plan C, an oil-well drill which will be ready in 8 or 9 days. Used by the country's state oil company in northern Chile, it drills the fastest of the three, and is capable of reaching the miners in 45 days after it becomes operational. But its power also increases the risk of rockfalls, so rescuers plan to aim it for the very bottom of the mine, some distance away from the other two efforts, which are aimed closer to the miners' refuge. The drill will be nearly 150 feet (45.7 metres) tall. Golborne also informed the media about the creation of a new "multiple-use-shaft" which is being used to send down water and telephone and video signals as well as ventilate the shelter where the 33 men have been trapped for 37 days. Some of the miners have reported skin infections due to the high humidity levels underground and the lack of fresh air. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e2fd4bf53ac35e874f6dff0d73665d08 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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