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CE Projects The American Family Today
 
05:22
In most countries around the world, the idea of family has been changing, and in the United States (U.S.) it has been changing a lot. Over the last 50 years, every aspect of the American family has changed. There are differences in what a family looks like and the roles people have in them. The idea of marriage is different, too, and that change has influenced the birthrate. Let's take a look at some of these changes. What does the American family look like? It seems like an easy question, but actually, it is difficult to answer. In the past, the traditional family in the U.S. included a mother, father and children. For most of the last century, other family members, like grandparents, have lived independently. In the traditional family, the father was the breadwinner, he alone provided most of money for the family, and the mother stayed home with the children. Today, that type of family is unusual. Non-traditional families are becoming more common. Non-traditional families include single-parent families, mixed families and homosexual families. Single parent families are families where a mother or father is raising children alone. This type of family is generally formed in one of three ways: parents divorce (nearly 50% of all marriages in the U.S. end in divorce), a parent dies, or a single woman chooses to have a baby alone. Mixed families are when two divorced people marry and their children live with them. Sometimes these couples have children of their own, so they have three types of children: his, hers and ours. The last type of family is the gay or lesbian family. About eight to ten million children are being raised in gay and lesbian households in the U.S. Most of these children were adopted; homosexuals can adopt children in 49 of the 50 U.S. states. The roles of men and women are also changing in the U.S. These days many American women want to have careers, so more women are working outside the home; now families often have two people earning salaries. As a result, in modern American families men are helping around the home more. Many men cook, clean and take care of children. Some men even work full-time at home while their wives support the family. These changes in sexual equality are good, but women still work more hours a week than most men when you include their work both inside and outside the home. You might have guessed that the view of marriage in the U.S. is changing, too. In fact, many people are choosing not to marry. In 2000, married families made up only 53 percent of American households, with non-family (for example, two college friends sharing an apartment together) and single-parent households holding the other 47 percent. In recent years, many Americans have been marrying people of a different race. This used to be considered bad, but these days the number of adults who approve of interracial marriage is 83%, a big change. Also, the people who are getting married are getting married later. These days the average age of first time marriage for men is 27 and for women it's 26. Since marriage is happening later, so is childbirth. Women are having children later, and they are having fewer children, so families are not as big as they were in the past. As you can see, the American family is difficult to describe because there are a lot of varieties. The idea of family and family life has changed very much over the years, and it will probably continue to change. However, one thing that has not changed is the importance of family. Whatever type of family a person has, that family is still important to every American.
Views: 5859 CEPsugiyama
CE Projects Food Review
 
05:19
With kind permission from Daymon Patterson Transcript (Very fast) Youtube Facebook Twitter, it's your main man Daym Drops, back again with another Super Official Review. Can you dig it baby? And I know you can. (Normal speed) Hey listen, man, and you know what it is. Let's see what's happening. You know I had to get bacon. You know what I'm saying? Slide that down there. Uh-huh, slide that top back. Oh, isn't that cute. Oh-hoo! Tight, brother, tight. Let's go in, players. I'd better bring you all in for this action. Man, listen. Crispy bacon. Mean seasoning. Bacon, cheese. How's that crust looking? That crust -- it's not -- it doesn't look extra crunchy, but it looks like it has possibilities. Look at the little cute little pizza sign right there dead smack in the middle. Pizza. Where is the rest of my pretzel-shaped butter cookie, is what I want to know. Why -- Why is it all broken up on the inside, man? Like, let me bring you in on this. All right? You see what's happening right now? Um-hm. The cheese is just wrapping itself around me like a king cobra. So I've got to do this quick, players. Now that bacon is right there at the bottom. I can't lie to you. That bacon is dead right. Um-hm. Crispy bacon. I told that boy extra-crispy bacon, he did extra-crispy bacon. Alright, hold on, time out. CVS they smell like gym socks, B. Let me just go ahead. Look at the little -- the little cute slices. Look at -- look at -- look at that. This is when you don't want to go too hard, you want something to hold you down. Ho! Hot! Hit that, hit that. Now the cheese itself, for my particular taste, I only like mozzarella cheese on my pizza. Mozzarella cheese on a burger: for some of you, you might love it. I like it. Love it? Mm. Like it? Yeah. The bun is right. The meat is extra juicy, and knocked out most of the fat by getting steamed. Just that cheese is throwing me for a loop-de-loop. Be ashamed of yourself, you taste so good, boo. That basil. That extra crispy bacon. And that oh-so crunchy crust. Oh, and you're buttery too, oh you're buttery. What's wrong with you? Come here, come here. Mm. Oh, man. Let me hit these things. Oh, oh, oh. Oh, these things are foul. Oh, shoot. Ugh! Oh, jeez. I can't get that taste out of my mouth. Er, I'm just going to give the burger a four. Yeah, on a one to five, Ted's steamed cheeseburger gets a four from big Daym. If I never have those cookies again another day in my life, even if there was nothing else on the world to eat, it would be too soon. Those cookies on a one to five get a negative two, a negative two. One a one to five -- Famous Pizza on a reopening scale, baby -- you're getting a four and a half all day from your boy. I like it. It's personal. It's intimate. If you ever go to your local CVS and you ever see those cookies on the shelf for any type of holiday, leave them on the shelf, please. Hat's off to the chef inside Ted's steamed cheeseburger spot, baby. Wo! It's your main man, Daym Drops, I'm out of here, baby.
Views: 1738 CEPsugiyama
History of Moving Pictures
 
05:52
Transcript Today, movies are a part of all of our lives, but they haven't always been. In fact, the history of the world's biggest entertainment industry is really quite short. The first moving pictures were shown on 'The Lumière Cinematograph' on December 28, 1895 in a Paris café. That day the Lumière brothers showed The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station, on their special machine. Afterwards, one brother said to reporters that he thought that movies would never become popular. He was completely wrong! In less than a year, cinemas had started to open in Europe and the USA. People loved the movies. By 1905 movie making wasn't just an idea, it was a successful new industry, and soon after, it had a capital -- Hollywood, USA. Hollywood was established in 1912 when a group of New York film makers decided to open a studio in California. They chose California because the weather was good (it didn't rain much there), and there were many beautiful places nearby to film their movies. Hollywood quickly attracted many actors and technicians from all over the country. At first, movies were "silent" because there was no recorded sound. Instead, the actors' dialog was shown on cards every 20 seconds. One director at the time said, "There will never be speaking pictures." He, like the Lumière brother, was wrong. In 1927 a revolution began. It was in this year that the actor Al Jolson spoke and sang in a movie for the first time. The reaction of the movie audience was very enthusiastic; they wanted more "talkies"! Soon, movie audiences had increased from 57 million people a week to 110 million a week. Only 31 years after the Lumières' first film showing, movies were a huge source of entertainment for people around the world. In 1932 there was another big change in movies: Technicolor. Color made movies more popular than ever. The next 20 years are often called Hollywood's 'golden age'. In the '30s and '40s, millions of people went to the cinema every week, so it was a golden time for Hollywood. However, in the late '40s, movies had a new and dangerous competition: TV. America's TV revolution began after World War II. John Logie Baird invented the television, and at first Hollywood didn't worry about it because it was small and only showed pictures in black and white. However, by the early '50s movie audiences had been cut by half because people were watching TV. The movie industry had a serious problem. Hollywood studios competed with TV by trying to make movies bigger, better and more realistic. Some of their ideas succeeded -- others failed. Interestingly, what really saved the movie industry wasn't a technical development at all; it was something completely different -- teenagers. In the mid-'50s, teenagers started going to see movies. Before this time, most movie audience members were over 30. Suddenly that changed. That change has continued ever since. These days 75% of all movie tickets are sold to people between the ages of 15 and 25. Today, TV and cinema live side-by-side. The movie industry didn't die after the invention of the TV, but movie audiences are still low compared to 60 years ago. Because of this, movie making is very different than it was in the golden age. Movies today actually have three lives: first in the theater, second on DVD and finally on TV. However, one thing hasn't changed, whether in the theater or at home, people still love watching movies.
Views: 1886 CEPsugiyama
Weebly - add an external link
 
01:10
Weebly - add and external link
Views: 246 CEPsugiyama
How to make a Quizlet account
 
01:59
How to make a quizlet account and add the AE reading class.
Views: 380 CEPsugiyama
Chart Tutorial 1 - graph
 
01:31
Chart Tutorial 1 - graph
Views: 32 CEPsugiyama
How to take an Mreader Quiz
 
01:23
Decide which book you will read by finding it on the Mreader website first. You must take quizzes that are your level. If you want to read a book that isn't on the website, ask your teacher. The Mreader website is at this link: http://mreader.org
Views: 4599 CEPsugiyama
Weebly - Starting your CEP Survival Manual site
 
03:23
Weebly - Starting your CEP Survival Manual site
Views: 74 CEPsugiyama
CE Projects History of Moving Pictures
 
04:49
Transcript Today, movies are a part of all of our lives, but they haven't always been. In fact, the history of the world's biggest entertainment industry is really quite short. The first moving pictures were shown on 'The Lumière Cinematograph' on December 28, 1895 in a Paris café. That day the Lumière brothers showed The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station, on their special machine. Afterwards, one brother said to reporters that he thought that movies would never become popular. He was completely wrong! In less than a year, cinemas had started to open in Europe and the USA. People loved the movies. By 1905 movie making wasn't just an idea, it was a successful new industry, and soon after, it had a capital -- Hollywood, USA. Hollywood was established in 1912 when a group of New York film makers decided to open a studio in California. They chose California because the weather was good (it didn't rain much there), and there were many beautiful places nearby to film their movies. Hollywood quickly attracted many actors and technicians from all over the country. At first, movies were "silent" because there was no recorded sound. Instead, the actors' dialog was shown on cards every 20 seconds. One director at the time said, "There will never be speaking pictures." He, like the Lumière brother, was wrong. In 1927 a revolution began. It was in this year that the actor Al Jolson spoke and sang in a movie for the first time. The reaction of the movie audience was very enthusiastic; they wanted more "talkies"! Soon, movie audiences had increased from 57 million people a week to 110 million a week. Only 31 years after the Lumières' first film showing, movies were a huge source of entertainment for people around the world. In 1932 there was another big change in movies: Technicolor. Color made movies more popular than ever. The next 20 years are often called Hollywood's 'golden age'. In the '30s and '40s, millions of people went to the cinema every week, so it was a golden time for Hollywood. However, in the late '40s, movies had a new and dangerous competition: TV. America's TV revolution began after World War II. John Logie Baird invented the television, and at first Hollywood didn't worry about it because it was small and only showed pictures in black and white. However, by the early '50s movie audiences had been cut by half because people were watching TV. The movie industry had a serious problem. Hollywood studios competed with TV by trying to make movies bigger, better and more realistic. Some of their ideas succeeded -- others failed. Interestingly, what really saved the movie industry wasn't a technical development at all; it was something completely different -- teenagers. In the mid-'50s, teenagers started going to see movies. Before this time, most movie audience members were over 30. Suddenly that changed. That change has continued ever since. These days 75% of all movie tickets are sold to people between the ages of 15 and 25. Today, TV and cinema live side-by-side. The movie industry didn't die after the invention of the TV, but movie audiences are still low compared to 60 years ago. Because of this, movie making is very different than it was in the golden age. Movies today actually have three lives: first in the theater, second on DVD and finally on TV. However, one thing hasn't changed, whether in the theater or at home, people still love watching movies.
Views: 332 CEPsugiyama
Zotero
 
00:34
Go to www.zotero.org and click register. Next choose and type a username. Type your email and choose and type a password.
Views: 45 CEPsugiyama
Formatting tutorial
 
02:25
Go to this address to download an example of properly formatted text: http://www.communicativeenglishprogram.com/ce-writing-resources.html
Views: 448 CEPsugiyama
How to study on Quizlet
 
01:47
How to study on Quizlet
Views: 344 CEPsugiyama
CE Projects Families
 
04:01
CE Projects Families
Views: 146 CEPsugiyama
How to register for mReader
 
01:14
How to register for mReader.
Views: 509 CEPsugiyama
Ada Lovelace
 
02:31
Ada Lovelace
Views: 110 CEPsugiyama
Weebly - Link a Page
 
02:27
Weebly - Link a Page
Views: 1407 CEPsugiyama
Charts: Line graph
 
02:03
Charts - Line graph
Views: 146 CEPsugiyama
Submitting Your Paragraphs
 
01:17
Submitting Your Paragraphs
Views: 142 CEPsugiyama
AE Results Input
 
02:14
AE Results Input
Views: 116 CEPsugiyama
Charts - Bar
 
02:04
Charts - Bar
Views: 107 CEPsugiyama
Installing Zotero
 
01:15
After you register for Zotero, you need to download Zotero. You need to open "firefox" to use Zotero. Do not use a different web browser. This is very important. If you do not understand, ask your teacher for help.
Views: 97 CEPsugiyama
Charts   Scatter
 
01:33
Views: 92 CEPsugiyama
Charts - Pie
 
00:51
Charts - Pie
Views: 86 CEPsugiyama
CE results input
 
04:28
CE results input
Views: 84 CEPsugiyama
Digital Stories Part 1
 
01:36
Views: 56 CEPsugiyama
CE Projects CR final
 
07:40
Views: 56 CEPsugiyama
Digital Story Part 2
 
01:55
Views: 43 CEPsugiyama
Adding a "Back" button to your CEPSV site
 
00:52
communicativeenglishprogram.com/cep-survival-manual
Views: 48 CEPsugiyama
Charts: Bar chart
 
02:04
Charts - Bar
Views: 25 CEPsugiyama
Chart Tutorial 2 - bar
 
01:36
Chart Tutorial 2 - bar
Views: 29 CEPsugiyama
Digital Stories Part II (Project 2)
 
01:59
Digital Stories Part II (Project 2)
Views: 32 CEPsugiyama
CEP Formatting Tutorial
 
02:56
CEP Formatting Tutorial
Views: 270 CEPsugiyama
AE Projects Digital Story Part 1
 
02:11
AE Projects Digital Story Part 1
Views: 42 CEPsugiyama
How to join Prezi for Education
 
01:12
Make sure you click on For Students and Teachers at the bottom of the prezi.com sign up page.
Views: 86 CEPsugiyama